Crisis Outside the Temple Walls (Revelation 11)

Crisis in Palestine

Danny Wakil, Billinudgel

John Scrivener (Letters, March 27) fails to get to grips with the real issue regarding Gaza – which is how the majority of the population there feel about their brutal leaders, Hamas.

The majority detest the Hamas terror organisation and desperately await their downfall. Publicly expressed opinion that is anti-Hamas is met with likely imprisonment or even death as seen with the recent ‘We want to live’ protests in Gaza.

Don’t take my word; Google Mosab Hassan Yousef, son of a Hamas leader. He devotes his life to showing the world how evil, cruel, and unjust Hamas are. 

Hamas has received untold millions of dollars in international aid – intended to benefit the population – but instead of building schools and hospitals, it funnels the money into building tunnels to send terrorists into Israel, as well as personal bank accounts.

This week alone, Hamas has fired well over 700 rockets at Israeli civilian areas in an attempt to escalate tensions before Eurovision in Israel. Its modus operandi is to destroy, rather than build or be constructive.

Scrivener alleges a ‘slow-motion genocide of Palestinians’ – yet  the annual population growth of the Palestinian people is one of the highest in the world. 

Mr Scrivener, posts like yours do a disservice to the Palestinians. I want them to enjoy a quality life. I want them to reject the likes of Hamas and make peace with Israel so that all parties can co-exist and in fact thrive. Until they do throw off the yoke of Hamas, it’s sadly not going to happen.

Gaza Terrorists Fly Balloon Bomb From Outside the Temple Walls (Revelation 11)

Gaza terrorists launch balloons loaded with flammable materials toward Israel during a night protest near the border with Israel, east of Rafah in the southern Gaza Strip, on March 19, 2019. 

Gaza Terrorists Fly Balloon Bomb into IDF Base

Photo Credit: Abed Rahim Khatib / Flash 90

An IDF base in southern Israel was balloon-bombed by Hamas terrorists on Saturday.

A cluster of balloons attached to an improvised incendiary device landed inside the military base.

Miraculously, none of the soldiers were inside the barracks at the time of the incident, and the explosive landed in an open area.

Military police from the bomb squad were called to the scene to neutralize the device. It was taken to a separate area to be defused safely.

According to Arab sources, the explosive was one of 30 such incendiary balloon devices that were sent into Israeli territory from Gaza during the Sabbath.

One Million Will Starve Outside the Temple Walls (Revelation 11:2)

One million face starvation in Gaza after U.S. cut aid to Palestine

5Pillars

More than a million people in Gaza are at risk of starvation in June unless international donors fill a $60m (£46m) funding gap manly caused by cuts to Palestinian refugee aid by the Trump administration, a UN agency has said.

The United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees (UNRWA) is calling on the EU, the Gulf states and countries such as China and Russia to make “firm commitments” of $60m by the middle of June to prevent hunger.

Matthias Schmale, the director of the UNRWA’s operations in Gaza said: “We are in a critical situation in terms of our food delivery work.

“We have over a million people receiving quarterly food handouts and many of these people would not really survive without that every quarter.”

Speaking in Brussels to European officials, Schmale said “the most immediate reason” for the funding gap was the withdrawal of U.S. aid.

The U.S., which is the UNRWA’s largest donor, announced last year it was cutting all funding to the agency.

Schmale said: “What I hear a lot in Gaza is that the US, because of its perceived erratic behaviour, is no longer seen as a credible intermediary.

“The EU has perceived political capital [but] the EU member states are too preoccupied with themselves, so it is probably unrealistic to expect the EU to play a role.”

The UNRWA was created in 1949 to provide short-term relief for Palestinian refugees after the 1948 Arab-Israeli conflict, runs hospitals, schools and social services in five areas including the West Bank, Lebanon, Syria and Jordan.

War Games Outside the Temple Walls (Revelation 11)

Palestinians try to extinguish a fire in the car of a Hamas commander who was killed in an Israeli air strike on Gaza City, on May 5. (photo credit:“ ASHRAF ABU AMRAH / REUTERS)

War games with Gaza | The Jerusalem post

By YOSSI MELMAN

We feel like we’re dealing with two little kids in a kindergarten,’ say the Egyptians.

Early May witnessed the most lethal and unnecessary round of the violent exchange of fire between Gaza and Israel since the last war. The facts illustrate this better than anything else. 

In the 57 months that elapsed since the war in the summer of 2014 known as Operation Protective Edge, not a single Israeli citizen was killed. In the short battle in May, which lasted 60 hours, four Israeli civilians died from rockets and some 30 Palestinians from air bombardment.

In the 50 days of Protective Edge, Hamas and the smaller Palestinian Islamic Jihad (PIJ) fired 4,500 rockets. In the two and a half days in May, they launched 700 rockets.

The two terror groups – new Chief of Staff Lt.-Gen. Aviv Kochavi calls them “Terror Armies” – used new war toys in the battle. It is clear that they possess more rockets than Israeli intelligence knew about. 

It is now estimated that Hamas and PIJ have around 15,000 rockets, mostly self-manufactured in secret workshops and assembly lines in Gaza, some of them built underground. 

The warheads are heavier and the rockets’ range extends to 150 kilometers (more than 90 miles) and can now reach Tel Aviv and further north. Hamas has worked hard utilizing local engineers and technicians, as well as know-how acquired in Iran and Malaysia to improve its accuracy. 

Hamas operators showed an impressive ability to fire barrages of rockets simultaneously in order to confuse Israel’s air defense. In one instance, more than 100 rockets were launched within one hour directed at Iron Dome batteries.

Hamas also has small naval commando and anti-aircraft units, a fleet of drones and copters, and a cyber department. True, these are in their inception. Nevertheless, all of them were used in the battle, though obviously no match for the mighty military machine of the Israel Defense Forces (IDF). 

Before the last round, the IDF psychological warfare department, which is part of Military Intelligence, tried to create a wedge between Hamas and the PIJ by spreading information and rumors accusing PIJ of plotting and operating against Israel behind Hamas’s back. 

But it turned out that during the recent clashes, the two groups worked very closely together from a joint command room, showings a high level of coordination, command and control, and a sense of common cause.

All in all, it is evident that Hamas and PIJ to a lesser degree are upgrading and improving their military capabilities and drawing lessons and conclusions from their past failures.

The IDF, for its part, also upended its attitude. It renewed the use of targeted killing, bombed Hamas-PIJ bunkers and command posts in the center of Gaza City, and exerted strong force in order to shock the enemy. It was brinkmanship. The instructions from the cabinet and Gen. Kochavi to the troops were: “Hit hard, but don’t cross the line! We don’t want to be dragged into an all out war.”

Since the two sides didn’t exchange messages during the battles, and they only conversed in fire, Hamas had to interpret Israel’s true intentions by itself. In such circumstances, the margins of error and miscalculation are high. 

Yet a full-scale war didn’t erupt. Hamas and PIJ demonstrated restraint and decided not to launch rockets against Tel Aviv, knowing the importance and the symbolic value of the city, which is considered as the beating heart of Israel.

Hamas didn’t want to be dragged into a war during the month of Ramadan, the most important holiday in the Muslim world. Israel was on the eve of its 71st Independence Day and in exciting preparations for the Eurovision, an international song contest. Neither side wanted to ruin its own parties. 

No wonder Gaza and Israel wanted a quick ceasefire, brokered as usual by Egyptian intelligence with a little help from Qatar. The round of hostilities was redundant because it changed nothing. The two sides stand exactly in the same spot where they were before it. 

In the weeks since the end of this round, the two sides have been engaged in a war of propaganda in which they have tried to convince public opinion at home and abroad that they won and the enemy lost. But it seems neither Israelis nor Gazans believe their government’s propaganda. It is even more evident in Israel. The most ardent supporters of the right-wing government of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu also know very well that Israeli deterrence suffered a major blow in the May clashes.

The sheer fact that Hamas and PIJ didn’t hesitate to challenge the IDF by launching hundreds of rockets is ultimate proof that while they may acknowledge Israeli superiority, they don’t fear Israel’s response and retaliation.

Their fearless approach derives from the asymmetrical realities of the two sides. Hamas exploits its limited military strength to the maximum to achieve a political goal. Its aim is to lift the Israeli blockade imposed on land, sea and air. Hamas aspires to improve the unbearable standards of living of the two million Palestinians who live in poverty, with undrinkable water, a constant shortage of electricity and a nearly 50% rate of unemployment. 

Hamas leaders, especially Yahya Sinwar, who served more than 20 years in an Israeli prison, know very well that they rule on the edge of a volcano. They know that the Gaza population is frustrated and angry, and may turn against them similar to the way in which the Arab masses got rid of or turned against their own governments in Egypt, Tunisia, Yemen and Syria. 

Hamas is more worried about its survival and the possible reaction of its people than Israeli guns. Thus, the group’s leadership seeks to do everything it can to change the miserable reality of Gaza.

The Israeli government, on the other hand, has no clear strategy or long-term diplomatic goals. Already 57 months ago in the indirect, proximity talks in Cairo between Israeli security officials and their Hamas-PIJ counterparts, moderated by Egyptian intelligence, major understandings were agreed upon. 

It was understood that Israel would lift its blockade, Gaza would be rehabilitated and rebuilt with new neighborhoods, a water desalination plant, an electricity power station and sewer projects, to be financed by Qatar and the international community. 

Israel even hinted that at the end of the rehabilitation process, it would agree to the construction of a sea port and airport. In return, Hamas and PIJ agreed to sign a long-term (five or maybe more years) sustainable ceasefire without recognizing the right of Israel to exist, but with a promise to restrain all the other small renegade terrorist organizations operating in Gaza. 

During the negotiations in 2014, the two sides also talked about the possibility of demilitarizing Gaza – but without any firm commitment by the Gazan representatives.

Very little of what was negotiated there and then materialized. Hamas and PIJ honored the ceasefire for three and a half years. Israel opened two border crossings to allow a flow of basic goods to Gaza and extended fishing waters to 12 nautical miles for Palestinian fishermen. 

Realizing that all the other promises were not kept, Hamas and PIJ embarked on a new path, employing tactical measures to break the diplomatic stalemate. They sent thousands of people to protest, demonstrate and occasionally to break and damage the new border fence and underground barrier of 66 kilometers that Israel is constructing to encompass the Strip. They launched arson kites, which set fires and burned Israeli fields along the border and, from time to time, renewed launching rockets in small numbers.

Israel responded by sniper fire and air strikes, killing some 250 Palestinians. To restore tranquility, senior Egyptian intelligence officials, including its chief, Gen. Abbas Kamel, traveled back and forth between Cairo-Gaza and Tel Aviv, and met with Hamas leaders and the heads of Israel’s intelligence community. 

All brokered ceasefires were short-lived and broken after a few days or weeks. The two sides have found themselves time and again rolling forward and then backward to the starting point. And this is exactly where they are once again right now.

While the Hamas position is clear and its aims well-known, it is difficult to read Netanyahu and understand what motivates him. As reported here by this writer in several articles, Netanyahu’s long-term strategy seems to be to prevent the creation of one unified Palestinian state in the West Bank and Gaza. He no longer talks about the “two-state solution.” In order to achieve his goal, he is trying to divide the Palestinians into two separate entities – one in Gaza and one in the West Bank, both of which will have limited autonomy. 

This is why Netanyahu is weakening the Palestinian Authority in the West Bank by depriving it of a significant portion of its own tax monies collected by Israel. At the same time, he allows Qatar to transfer a monthly “ransom” of $30 million to Gaza, part of which goes to Hamas, enabling it to produce rockets and other armaments. No wonder that his critics, including from within his ruling Likud party and the cabinet, call it “blood money” or “protection money” and blame Netanyahu for surrendering to terror.

The mystery surrounding Netanyahu’s approach is even more difficult to understand since it seems to contradict his own long-term goals. If he wishes to divide and rule, it should be in his interest to help Gaza and its people lead as normal a life as possible. However, by refusing to reach a long-term solution with Hamas he only aggravates the situation.

Not only Hamas understands this reality but so does Egypt. Western diplomatic sources involved in the efforts to reach a comprehensive solution told me that they had heard Egyptian officials express their frustration. 

“We feel like we’re dealing with two little kids in a kindergarten,” they cited the Egyptians as saying. 

Surely it’s also an Egyptian national interest that Gaza will remain calm. Egypt and Israel are strong allies and, as President Abdel Fatah el-Sisi admitted in an interview with CBS’s 60 Minutes a few months ago, have enhanced their military and intelligence cooperation in the war against ISIS in Sinai. 

“But,” as the Egyptian officials remarked, “with all our best intentions and good services, we are getting tired of Netanyahu’s games.”

It is clear to all involved parties that if – in a matter of weeks after Netanyahu forms his new cabinet – a comprehensive long-term agreement is not achieved soon by Israel and Hamas, a new war will break out once again – with one exception. 

This time it will be much more violent. Thousands of casualties can be expected on both sides with great damage to buildings and property. And there is the strong possibility that in the eventuality of a new war, the IDF will have no choice but to conquer Gaza, which its commanders are against as are as the majority of Israelis.

50 Palestinians Wounded Outside the Temple Walls (Revelation 11)

Nearly 50 Palestinians wounded on Gaza-Israel border

Palestinian -demonstrators -Nakba

Palestinian demonstrators run for cover from tear gas canisters fired by Israeli forces during a protest marking the 71st anniversary of the ‚Nakba, near the Israel-Gaza border fence, east of Gaza City May 15, 2019 Reuters

Israeli troops fired tear gas and rubber bullets to repel them, but also live ammunition, the witnesses said

Israeli troops wounded nearly 50 Palestinians at the Gaza border on Wednesday during protests to mark the 71st anniversary of the „Nakba“, or catastrophe, when many Palestinians lost their homes in the fighting around Israel’s creation, Gaza officials said.

Thousands had gathered at the coastal enclave’s frontier with Israel, the scene of bloodshed over the past year that has raised international concern.

Groups approached the border fence, planting Palestinian flags and throwing stones towards Israeli soldiers on the other side despite the efforts of marshalls in orange vests to keep protesters away from the barrier, witnesses said.

Israeli troops fired tear gas and rubber bullets to repel them, but also live ammunition, the witnesses said.

The Gaza Health Ministry said at least 47 people were wounded, though it was not clear how many of those were hit by live ammunition or were hurt by rubber bullets or by inhaling tear gas.

The Israeli military said about 10,000 rioters and demonstrators gathered in several places along the Gaza Strip fence.

„The rioters are setting tyres on fire and hurling rocks. A number of explosive devices have been hurled within the Gaza Strip, as well, and a number of attempts have been made to approach the security fence. IDF troops are responding with riot dispersal means.“

Wednesday’s rallies were called to mark Nakba Day, what Palestinians term the catastrophe that befell them at Israel’s creation in 1948, when hundreds of thousands fled or were expelled from lands in what is now Israel.

„Our people rise today to announce their rejection to this crime and to assert their right in Palestine, all of Palestine,“ Islamic Jihad leader Khader Habib said at one demonstration, referring to Israel and the territories it captured in the 1967 Middle East war.

„Palestine is ours, the sea is ours, the sky is ours and the land is ours, and those strangers must be removed,“ he said.

Another protester, Jamila Mahmoud, 50, said her family had originally come from Asqlan, now the Israeli city of Ashkelon, near Gaza.

„If we don’t return, maybe our children and grandchildren will do, one day we will get our rights back,“ Mahmoud said at the border protest site.

Palestinians also held rallies in the occupied West Bank but no major clashes with Israeli forces were immediately reported.

This year’s Nakba protests were preceded by a surge in deadly cross-border fighting between Gaza militants and Israel which ended in a ceasefire on May 6.

Israeli troops have killed more than 200 Palestinians and wounded thousands in regular border protests since March 2018, according to human rights groups. UN investigators have said the Israeli military might be guilty of war crimes for using excessive force.

Israel has said it is defending its border against attacks against its troops and infiltration attempts by gunmen.

Israel has rejected a Palestinian right of return as a threat to maintaining a Jewish majority in a country it describes as the nation-state of the Jewish people.

Frustration is growing among Palestinians as hopes fade for a two-state solution to the conflict which would give them an independent country. President Donald Trump’s announcement in December 2017 of US recognition of disputed Jerusalem as Israel’s capital also fuelled Palestinian anger.

War Games Outside the Temple Walls (Revelation 11)

image-3114
By YOSSI MELMAN
‘We feel like we’re dealing with two little kids in a kindergarten,’ say the Egyptians.
Early May witnessed the most lethal and unnecessary round of the violent exchange of fire between Gaza and Israel since the last war. The facts illustrate this better than anything else. 
In the 57 months that elapsed since the war in the summer of 2014 known as Operation Protective Edge, not a single Israeli citizen was killed. In the short battle in May, which lasted 60 hours, four Israeli civilians died from rockets and some 30 Palestinians from air bombardment.
In the 50 days of Protective Edge, Hamas and the smaller Palestinian Islamic Jihad (PIJ) fired 4,500 rockets. In the two and a half days in May, they launched 700 rockets.

The Nations Continue to Trample Outside the Temple Walls (Revelation 11)

Image result for hamasHamas official to Israel: The ‘day of your slaughter’ is approaching

Times of Israel

Senior Hamas official Fathi Hamad addresses Palestinians near the border in the northern Gaza Strip.

“We came to tell the Zionist enemy, its men, army, government and Knesset: ‘Go away from us.’ The day of your slaughter, extermination and demise is approaching,” says Hamad, who is known for employing fiery rhetoric.

“All of you should look for a place in Europe… hell, the sea, the ocean or the Bermuda Triangle. There is no place for all of you in Palestine. There is no place for you in the land of Jerusalem. There is no place for you in the Al-Aqsa Mosque, Jaffa, Haifa, Acre or any place.”

Adam Rasgon

Starvation Outside the Temple Walls (Revelation 11)

UN: Over 1m Palestinians in Gaza may not have food in June

Palestinian children stand next to bags of food aid provided by the UN agency for Palestinian refugees at their family home in the Gaza Strip on 24 January 2018 [Said Khatib/AFP/Getty Images]

May 13, 2019 at 1:22 pm

UNRWA warned today that unless it secures $60m in funding by June, its ability to continue providing food to more than one million Palestinian refugees in Gaza will be severely curtailed.

In a statement the international organisation said: “At a time when Muslims around the world are observing the holy month of Ramadan, often characterised by the festive nature of its Iftars, in Gaza, more than half the population depends on food aid from the international community.”

The statement stressed that unless UNRWA secures “at least an additional $60 million by June, their ability to continue providing food to more than one million Palestinian refugees in Gaza, including some 620,000 abject poor – those who cannot cover their basic food needs and who have to survive on $1.6 per day – and nearly 390,000 absolute poor – those who survive on about $3.5 per day – will be severely challenged.”

UNRWA is funded almost entirely by voluntary contributions and financial support has been outpaced by the growth in needs. From fewer than 80,000 Palestine refugees receiving UNRWA social assistance in Gaza in the year 2000, there are today over one million people who need emergency food assistance without which they cannot get through their day.

Matthias Schmale, Director of UNRWA Operations in Gaza, said: “This is a near ten-fold increase caused by the blockade that lead to the closure of Gaza and its disastrous impact on the local economy, the successive conflicts that razed entire neighbourhoods and public infrastructure to the ground, and the ongoing internal Palestinian political crisis that started in 2007 with the arrival of Hamas to power in Gaza.”

A report issued by the United Nations in 2017 warned that the Gaza Strip would be “uninhabitable” by 2020.

The unemployment rate in Gaza rose to 52 per cent last year, with more than one million of the enclaves two million population dependent on quarterly UNRWA food handouts.

Established in 1949, UNRWA provides critical aid to Palestinian refugees in the blockaded Gaza Strip, the Israeli-occupied West Bank, Jordan, Lebanon and Syria.

Last year, the US State Department said Washington would “no longer commit funding” to the UNRWA.

The US had been UNRWA’s largest contributor by far, providing it with $350 million annually — roughly a quarter of the agency’s overall budget.

This came a month after reports emerged of a secret American report stated that there are only 40,000 Palestinian refugees, noting they are the Palestinians who left their home land in 1948 and remain alive today and not their descendants.

US President Donald Trump’s senior advisor and son-in-law, Jared Kushner, is reported to have tried to pressure Jordan to strip more than two million Palestinians of refugee status in a move that aims to end the work of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees (UNRWA).

The Prelude to War Outside the Temple Walls (Revelation 11)

Gaza escalation; a prelude to Hamas-Israel war?

Ben Caspit May 10, 2019

The most recent round of violence between Israel and the Gaza Strip on May 4 and 5 was more violent and deadlier than the ones before. For the first time in a long while, Israel’s military skipped directly to measures it usually reserves for more advanced stages of such fighting, killing Hamas targets and demolishing the organization’s command centers located in residential apartment buildings in Gaza. Hamas and the Islamic Jihad seem to have had the same idea of an advanced fighting stage. According to Arab media reports, the two groups tried to breach the defenses of Israel’s anti-missile Iron Dome batteries with heavy barrages designed to overwhelm the system’s interceptor rockets and improve the prospects of penetration. “Iron Dome’s success rate is still high,” an Israeli security source told Al-Monitor on condition of anonymity, “but when you let loose many missiles at once, naturally the numbers of non-intercepted missiles grow accordingly. It is still the same 8% [of non-intercepted missiles], but when 10 missiles penetrate the defenses, the effect is different than when two do.”

For Israel, this resulted in a grim toll: four civilian deaths and searing, incontrovertible proof that it cannot defend itself hermetically against a hail of rockets, anti-tank missiles and artillery shells, a further indication that the addiction to Iron Dome has some unhealthy aspects, as well.

Factors that accelerated the escalation were at play this time on both the Israeli and Gaza side. On the Israeli side, there is a new, energetic army chief, Lt. Gen. Aviv Kochavi, who appears to have had enough of the periodic rounds of fighting with Gaza occurring at shorter and shorter intervals. On the other side, the Islamic Jihad is becoming increasingly independent, shaking off all restraints, ruining Hamas plans and spoiling its parties. Members of the Israeli government’s security Cabinet say intelligence reports point to two possible motivations for this Islamist group’s decision. One is that the group is carrying out orders from Tehran, which is in desperate need of a violent clash between Israel and the Palestinians. The other, a security source said on condition of anonymity, is that the Islamic Jihad is simply a gang of “irresponsible, childish and violent people,” as its leaders were described in one intelligence report (reported here May 3).

Either way, everyone in Israel understands that the relatively short round that ended through Egyptian-Qatari mediation was only a teaser. Former Defense Minister Avigdor Liberman, who stepped down in November over what he described as Israeli inactivity vis-a-vis Gaza and because his demand for broad military action in the Strip was rejected, is warming up on the sidelines. Leaks by associates of the hawkish right-wing politician indicate that he has reached an understanding regarding Gaza with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, who is expected to appoint Liberman anew as defense minister in the fifth government Netanyahu is cobbling together. This cannot be good news for Hamas and the Islamic Jihad. Liberman is also counting on Kochavi; before Liberman quit as defense minister, he tagged Kochavi to become chief of the Israel Defense Forces (IDF) despite Netanyahu’s preference for another candidate, Maj. Gen. Eyal Zamir. Kochavi has already delivered a first installment. In the latest round with Gaza, Kochavi ordered the air force to bomb joint Hamas and Islamic Jihad command centers, some located in apartment buildings, and provided a sample of Israel’s capabilities in carrying out “targeted eliminations” of its enemies when it fired an airborne missile at a vehicle carrying Hamad Hudri, who served as Iran’s paymaster in Gaza before he was killed.

The IDF denies that Kochavi is changing the policy adopted by his predecessor Gadi Eizenkot, who worked hard to prevent escalations that could lead to yet another pointless war with Gaza. Military officials say the reason for the apparent shift is far simpler. The attacks against Hamas and Islamic Jihad infrastructure have played themselves out and are no longer effective. There are no more valuable targets for Israel to strike and with which to exact a heavy price from the terror organizations. The IDF escalated its response to the attacks from Gaza in this past round because it had no other choice.

There remains the question of the goal. No one in Israel is fooling themselves into thinking that even with its stepped-up measures, Israel had restored its deterrence vis-a-vis Gaza and that calm would return to the Strip and its surroundings. Senior Israeli military officials were quoted last week warning that unless significant measures are adopted to alleviate the humanitarian and economic crisis in Gaza, renewed violence is only a matter of time. Israel’s security Cabinet, which has long served as a rubber stamp for Netanyahu’s one-man rule, was quick to hit back at the unnamed officers. No winners emerged from this clash, either. It, too, probably foreshadows things to come.

The one bright spot is Qatar. The oil and gas principality has been engaged in a complex love-hate relationship with Israel in recent years. On the one hand, Qatar is closely aligned with various terrorist groups, funding militias and stirring up incitement through its very own Al Jazeera network. On the other hand, it has served as a significant moderating factor using its financial resources to ease tensions. At the end of the flare-up, Qatar announced it would give the Palestinians nearly half a billion dollars in aid. This is supposed to throw Hamas a lifeline. The money is not destined only for Gaza, on the contrary: Most of it [$300 million] will go to Palestinian President head Mahmoud Abbas, whose fiefdom is also experiencing rapid economic deterioration (as reported here in the past).

According to senior Israeli sources, unlike previous times, this time the Qataris are willing to accept close and significant monitoring of the funds reaching Gaza, including Israeli oversight. This increases the prospects of funds reaching needy individuals and alleviating the deep crisis in the enclave — rather than being diverted to the terrorist organizations operating there. This is not enough, Israeli military sources say, but for the time being, it will have to do.

All eyes are now on the drama playing out between Tehran and Washington — including Iran’s announcement this week over uranium enrichment — which also involves Hezbollah chief Hassan Nasrallah, Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and many others. Netanyahu is far more invested in this front; the southern one interests him a lot less. He views the obstruction of Iran’s nuclear capability as a historic task of biblical dimensions, regarding the terrorist groups in Gaza as nothing more than annoying background noise of limited threat potential.

However, others think differently. Newly sworn-in Blue and White Knesset member Zvi Hauzer, formerly Netanyahu’s Cabinet secretary (2009-13), is waging a campaign to demilitarize Gaza. Hauzer believes that those who dismiss Hamas will get Hezbollah instead. After all, that is exactly what happened to Israel in Lebanon. “Just as the international community, along with a real military threat, forced Assad to give up his chemical weapons, the same should be done with Gaza,” he told Al-Monitor. “Hamas and Jihad have to understand that they are risking their hold on power and their lives if they continue firing rockets at Israel. Once they realize this, we will see a convoy of thousands of rockets and missiles transported from the Strip southward toward Egypt. Until then, the violence will continue.”

More Injured Outside the Temple Walls (Revelation 11)

 

1 Palestinian killed, 30 injured in clashes with Israeli soldiers in eastern Gaza

Palestinian protesters clash with Israeli troops on the Gaza-Israel border, east of Gaza City, May 10, 2019. At least one Palestinian demonstrator was killed and 30 others wounded on Friday during their clashes with Israeli soldiers stationed on the border between the eastern Gaza Strip and Israel. (Xinhua)

Ashraf al-Qedra, spokesman of the Health Ministry in Gaza told reporters that Abdulla Abdel Aal, a 24-year-old from the southern Gaza Strip town of Rafah, died after he was shot by Israeli soldiers in his abdomen.

Meanwhile, 30 demonstrators were wounded by Israeli gunfire, including a field paramedic who was shot in the head and is in moderate condition, he added.

On Friday afternoon, hundreds of Palestinian demonstrators headed to the area between eastern Gaza and Israel in protest against the peace plan the United States will announce soon, better known as the „Deal of the Century.“

The demonstrators joined the weekly anti-Israel rally, known as the Great March of Return, which has been going on since the end of March last year.

Earlier in the day, the Gaza Health Ministry said the Israeli army has killed 304 Palestinians and wounded 17,301 others including 3,544 children and 1,168 women, since the beginning of the weekly rally.

A Palestinian protester uses a slingshot to hurl stones at Israeli troops during clashes on the Gaza-Israel border, east of Gaza City, May 10, 2019. At least one Palestinian demonstrator was killed and 30 others wounded on Friday during their clashes with Israeli soldiers stationed on the border between the eastern Gaza Strip and Israel. (Xinhua)

A Palestinian protester uses a slingshot to hurl stones at Israeli troops during clashes on the Gaza-Israel border, east of Gaza City, May 10, 2019. At least one Palestinian demonstrator was killed and 30 others wounded on Friday during their clashes with Israeli soldiers stationed on the border between the eastern Gaza Strip and Israel. (Xinhua)

A Palestinian woman holds a Palestinian flag during clashes with Israeli troops on the Gaza-Israel border, east of Gaza City, May 10, 2019. At least one Palestinian demonstrator was killed and 30 others wounded on Friday during their clashes with Israeli soldiers stationed on the border between the eastern Gaza Strip and Israel. (Xinhua)

Palestinians run to take cover from tear gas canisters fired by Israeli troops during clashes on the Gaza-Israel border, east of Gaza City, May 10, 2019. At least one Palestinian demonstrator was killed and 30 others wounded on Friday during their clashes with Israeli soldiers stationed on the border between the eastern Gaza Strip and Israel. (Xinhua)

A Palestinian protester uses a slingshot to hurl stones at Israeli troops during clashes on the Gaza-Israel border, east of Gaza City, May 10, 2019. At least one Palestinian demonstrator was killed and 30 others wounded on Friday during their clashes with Israeli soldiers stationed on the border between the eastern Gaza Strip and Israel. (Xinhua)

Palestinian protesters use slingshot to hurl stones at Israeli troops during clashes on the Gaza-Israel border, east of Gaza City, May 10, 2019. At least one Palestinian demonstrator was killed and 30 others wounded on Friday during their clashes with Israeli soldiers stationed on the border between the eastern Gaza Strip and Israel. (Xinhua)

Palestinians run to take cover from tear gas canisters fired by Israeli troops during clashes on the Gaza-Israel border, east of Gaza City, May 10, 2019. At least one Palestinian demonstrator was killed and 30 others wounded on Friday during their clashes with Israeli soldiers stationed on the border between the eastern Gaza Strip and Israel. (Xinhua)

A Palestinian boy takes cover during clashes with Israeli troops on the Gaza-Israel border, east of southern Gaza Strip city of Khan Younis, May 10, 2019. At least one Palestinian demonstrator was killed and 30 others wounded on Friday during their clashes with Israeli soldiers stationed on the border between the eastern Gaza Strip and Israel. (Xinhua/Yasser Qudih)

Palestinians run to take cover from tear gas canisters fired by Israeli troops during clashes on the Gaza-Israel border, east of southern Gaza Strip city of Khan Younis, May 10, 2019. At least one Palestinian demonstrator was killed and 30 others wounded on Friday during their clashes with Israeli soldiers stationed on the border between the eastern Gaza Strip and Israel. (Xinhua/Yasser Qudih)

Palestinian medics carry a wounded man during clashes with Israeli troops on the Gaza-Israel border, east of southern Gaza Strip city of Khan Younis, May 10, 2019. At least one Palestinian demonstrator was killed and 30 others wounded on Friday during their clashes with Israeli soldiers stationed on the border between the eastern Gaza Strip and Israel. (Xinhua/Yasser Qudih)

Palestinian protesters take cover during clashes with Israeli troops on the Gaza-Israel border, east of Gaza City, May 10, 2019. At least one Palestinian demonstrator was killed and 30 others wounded on Friday during their clashes with Israeli soldiers stationed on the border between the eastern Gaza Strip and Israel. (Xinhua)

Relatives of Palestinian Abdulla Abdel Aal mourn on his funeral in the southern Gaza Strip town of Rafah on May 11, 2019. At least one Palestinian demonstrator was killed and 30 others wounded on Friday during their clashes with Israeli soldiers stationed on the border between the eastern Gaza Strip and Israel. Ashraf al-Qedra, spokesman of the Health Ministry in Gaza told reporters that Abdulla Abdel Aal, a 24-year-old from the southern Gaza Strip town of Rafah, died after he was shot by Israeli soldiers in his abdomen. (Xinhua/Khaled Omar)

A relative of Palestinian Abdulla Abdel Aal cries on his funeral in the southern Gaza Strip town of Rafah on May 11, 2019. At least one Palestinian demonstrator was killed and 30 others wounded on Friday during their clashes with Israeli soldiers stationed on the border between the eastern Gaza Strip and Israel. Ashraf al-Qedra, spokesman of the Health Ministry in Gaza told reporters that Abdulla Abdel Aal, a 24-year-old from the southern Gaza Strip town of Rafah, died after he was shot by Israeli soldiers in his abdomen. (Xinhua/Khaled Omar)

Mourners carry the body of Palestinian Abdulla Abdel Aal during his funeral in the southern Gaza Strip town of Rafah on May 11, 2019. At least one Palestinian demonstrator was killed and 30 others wounded on Friday during their clashes with Israeli soldiers stationed on the border between the eastern Gaza Strip and Israel. Ashraf al-Qedra, spokesman of the Health Ministry in Gaza told reporters that Abdulla Abdel Aal, a 24-year-old from the southern Gaza Strip town of Rafah, died after he was shot by Israeli soldiers in his abdomen. (Xinhua/Khaled Omar)