The Growing Pakistani Nuclear Horn: Daniel 8

Pakistan Army’s Ranking improved

By Prof. Engr. Zamir Ahmed Awan

January 24, 2021

According to data issued by the group on its official website, Pakistan Army has been ranked the 10th most powerful in the world out of 133 countries on the Global Firepower index 2021.Especially the Special Services Group (SSG) is among the best in the world.  Just behind; 1- United States PwrIndx: 0.0721,  2- Russia PwrIndx: 0.0796, 3- China PwrIndx: 0.0858, 4- India PwrIndx: 0.1214, 5- Japan PwrIndx: 0.1435, 6- South Korea PwrIndx: 0.1621, 7- France PwrIndx: 0.1691, 8- United Kingdom PwrIndx: 0.2008, 9- Brazil PwrIndx: 0.2037, 10- Pakistan PwrIndx: 0.2083.

Global Firepower (GFP) list relies on more than 50 factors to determine a nation’s Power Index (‘PwrIndx’) score with categories ranging from military might and financials to logistical capability and geography.

Our unique, in-house formula allows for smaller, more technologically-advanced, nations to compete with larger, lesser-developed ones. In the form of bonuses and penalties, special modifiers are applied to further refine the annual list. Color arrows indicate a year-over-year trend comparison.

The geopolitical environment, especially the regional security situation, is quite hostile. Pakistan is bordering India, a typical adversary and has not accepted Pakistan’s independence from the core of heart, and always trying to damage Pakistan. The Kashmir issue is a long standing issue between the two rivals. On the other hand, the Afghan situation is a permanent security threat for Pakistan. Bordering Iran means always facing a danger of aggression from the US or Israel on Iran, resulting in vulnerabilities in Pakistan. The Middle East is a hot burning region and posing instability in the region. The growing tension between China and the US is also a source of a major headache for Pakistan.

Under such a scenario, Pakistan has to be very conscious regarding its security and sovereignty. Although Pakistan’s ailing economy is not supporting its defense needs, it may not compromise strategic issues for its survival. Pakistan focuses on the quality of its forces instead of quantity. The tough training makes a real difference—the utilization of Science and Technology-enabled Pakistan to maintain its supremacy.

Pakistan is situated at a crucial location – the entrance point to the oil-rich Arabian Gulf is just on the major trading route for energy. Pakistan is at the conjunction of Africa, Europe, Eurasia, Central Asia, East Asia, South Asia, and China. Pakistan is a pivotal state and always focus of world powers.

During the cold war era, Pakistan sided with the US and protected the region’s American interests. The US military establishment knows well that as long as Pakistan stands with the US, it can achieve all its strategic goals in the region. However, It was the American choice to give more importance to India and ignore Pakistan.

Pakistan is a peace-loving nation and struggling for the promotion of peace globally. Pakistan always raises its voice at the UN and other international forums for oppressed ones and against any injustice. Pakistan. In the history of seven decades, Pakistan was never involved in any aggression against any country. Pakistan’s official stance is, “We are partner for peace with any country, any nation, or individuals.” Pakistan is a partner and supporter of any peace-initiative in any part of the world. 

However, Pakistan is always prepared to protect its territorial integrity and will not allow any aggressor to harm our sovereignty at any cost. Pakistan is determined for its independence and geographical integrity.

Pakistan is no threat to any country or nation. Neither have any intention of expansion. But always ready to give a tough time to any aggressor.

Babylon the Great Stands Up to the China Nuclear Horn EU

U.S. reaffirms Taiwan support after China sends warplanes

“We urge Beijing to cease its military, diplomatic, and economic pressure against Taiwan and instead engage in meaningful dialogue.”

Ambassador Kelly Craft accompanied the tweet with a photo of herself in the U.N. General Assembly Hall where the island is banned. She carried a handbag with a stuffed Taiwan bear sticking out of the top, a gift from Taiwan’s representative in New York, Ambassador James Lee.

Taiwan and China separated amid civil war in 1949 and China says it is determined to bring the island under its control by force if necessary. The U.S. switched diplomatic recognition from Taipei to Beijing in 1979, but is legally required to ensure Taiwan can defend itself and the self-governing democratic island enjoys strong bipartisan support in Washington.

Tsai has sought to bolster the island’s defenses with the purchase of billions of dollars in U.S. weapons, including upgraded F-16 fighter jets, armed drones, rocket systems and Harpoon missiles capable of hitting both ships and land targets. She has also boosted support for Taiwan’s indigenous arms industry, including launching a program to build new submarines to counter China’s ever-growing naval capabilities.

China’s increased threats come as economic and political enticements bear little fruit, leading it to stage war games and dispatch fighter jets and reconnaissance planes on an almost daily basis toward the island of 24 million people.

Fragile Peace with Pakistan Before the First Nuclear War: Revelation 8

Cyber Weapons And Fragile Peace Between India And Pakistan – OpEd

Fatima Ahmed and Tajjalla Munir*

The South Asian sub-continent had remained turbulent since two nation-states Pakistan and India had been carved out by the British in 1947. Since partition, the relations of Pakistan and India had been contentious mainly because of the disputed region of Kashmir. Both archrivals have fought three wars over Kashmir and their relations have been mired with hostility and distrust ever since. The relations between the two states grew more sensitive when both acquired nuclear weapons. With nuclear weapons, nuclear deterrence was achieved and it led to strategic stability in South Asia. This strategic stability doesn’t rule out the occurrence of conflicts between the two archrivals. The small clashes can easily get out of hand and can disturb strategic stability. The recent example of the Pulwama attack in February 2019, illustrates this point of view. The world saw that due to the attack on Pulwama, the blame game started by India, and in few days tensions escalated and Pakistan and India were standing at the brink of nuclear war.

Nuclear deterrence is the only factor that provides strategic stability in the region but the presence of nuclear deterrence is not always helpful in ensuring peace. It somehow retains space for small conflicts and the threat of escalation of these conflicts is always present. The best example of this was a crisis between both states that happened in the second month of 2019.

In February 2019, Indian paramilitary forces were targeted by a terrorist attack. More than 40 soldiers died in the attack and the Indian authorities were quick to blame Pakistan on this incident. Prime Minister of Pakistan openly stated that, if Indians could provide any actionable evidence that terrorists are linked with Pakistan they will utilize all necessary resources to bring the perpetrators to justice. But Indian authorities did not provide any evidence and they were adamant to Punish Pakistan for what they call support of terrorism in Indian occupied Kashmir. On the night of February 26, Indian fighter jets intruded Pakistan’s air space and claimed to destroy a terrorist camp. But later it was revealed that there was no causality in Pakistan. Pakistan responded the next day by engaging a target inside Indian occupied Kashmir next and in a subsequent dog fight, India lost one of its fighter planes and the pilot was captured by Pakistan. After this India planned to hit the target with conventional missiles and Pakistan also promised to do the same. This readiness by both states to strike the target with missiles in each other’s territory brought the region to the brink of nuclear war. However, Pakistan released Indian pilot Abhinandan Varthaman as a “peace gesture” which played an important role in diffusing tension. Although the nuclear war was averted by taking some rational decisions from both sides this crisis demonstrated the fact of the fragility of peace between India and Pakistan. It also created fear in the minds of the international community that any upcoming crisis, maybe our luck will be not sufficient enough to avert nuclear war in South Asia.

When two nuclear-armed neighbors are involved in continuous rivalry or they have longstanding disputes between them, there is always a fear that any crisis between them could escalate and soon get out of control. The main threat that is associated with escalation is that the crisis could turn into a conflict that could bring nuclear weapons into the theater of war. There are two major types of strategic thinkers about this issue, one is those who are optimistic about the effectiveness of nuclear deterrence while others are pessimists. Both these groups brought their research from cold war times. But it is not necessary that theories that were successful during the cold war may also succeed in the South Asian context because of many structural and technical differences. Leaders of both states have adopted the policy of brinkmanship, during many crises that occurred in the subcontinent. This policy brought with it dangers of escalation during the time of crisis. As Thomas C Schelling said, “Brinksmanship involves getting onto the slope where one may fall in spite of his own best efforts to save himself, dragging his adversary with him”.

After the advent of nuclear weapons, cyber weapons are the most destructive thing that we can imagine in this contemporary world. Nuclear weapons can lead to tangible damage. In the age when the world has become a global village, cyber weapons pose a threat to international peace. Cyberspace provided the fifth domain in the area of armed conflict. Previously, they were air, land, sea, and space.  Nuclear weapons are generally used for deterrence purposes and they are mostly used or considered as last option weapons, cyber-attack on the other hand can be materialized when there is no apparent conflict between two states. Due to the deep enmity between Indian and Pakistan, it will always a threat that both countries can target each other in cyberspace. When a cyber-attack is launched against India and Pakistan, they will blame each other but the perpetrators of this attack could be the third party. That could be state-sponsored cyber-attack or even non-state actors and individuals could carry out such endeavors. This has already happened, when a cyber-attack targeted some websites in India. Initially, Pakistan was made responsible for these attacks but later it was revealed that the offensive was done by a third party. It was due to insecurity and doubt present in both states about each other’s intentions or capabilities. While initially cyber-attacks can be very limited in scope but there are fair chances that it could escalate which could result in a conflict with the use of conventional weapons. Therefore in modern times, cyber weapons pose a great threat to the peaceful relations between India and Pakistan. That will ultimately lead to regional instability.

*Fatima Ahmed and Tajjalla Munir are Research Scholar at COMSATS University Islamabad.

The Pakistani horn successfully tests medium-range missiles

Pakistan successfully tests medium-range missile

Pakistan’s military did not say whether the test-fired Shaheen III missile was capable of carrying nuclear weapons.

By

Asad Hashim

21 Jan 2021

Karachi, Pakistan – Pakistan has successfully test-fired the surface-to-surface Shaheen III ballistic missile with a range of 2,750km (1,710 miles), its military says.

The missile test, conducted on Wednesday, “was aimed at re-validating various design and technical parameters of the weapon system”, said a statement from the military’s press wing.

The statement said the missile’s point of impact was in the Arabian Sea, and that the test was witnessed by the chairman of Pakistan’s Joint Chiefs of Staff Committee, Lieutenant-General Nadeem Zaki Manj, and other top officials.

Pakistan’s military did not say whether the tested version of the Shaheen III missile was capable of carrying nuclear weapons, although it has previously been described as having that capability.

Shaheen III, a land-based surface-to-surface medium-range ballistic missile, shown during a military event [File: T Mughal/EPA]

Pakistan is one of eight nations worldwide with stated nuclear weapons capability.

Its eastern neighbour and rival India, with whom it has fought three full-scale wars since both countries gained independence from Britain in 1947, also has nuclear weapons.

The Shaheen III is Pakistan’s longest-range missile system, developed with the intention of being capable of reaching Indian island territories to deny Indian forces the ability to establish a “second strike capability”, according to comments made by retired Lieutenant-General Khalid Kidwai, the former chief of Pakistan’s nuclear plans division in 2015.

“Chairman Joint Chiefs of Staff Committee asserted that Pakistan desires peaceful co-existence in the region and its strategic capability is to deter any aggression against the sovereignty of Pakistan,” said the military statement after Wednesday’s test.

Both South Asian countries routinely conduct missile tests, of which they notify the other in advance as per a 2005 bilateral missile test pact.

President Arif Alvi and Prime Minister Imran Khan congratulated the military and the scientists involved after the successful test.

Asad Hashim is Al Jazeera’s digital correspondent in Pakistan. He tweets @AsadHashim.

The growing Pakistani nuclear horn: Daniel 8

Pakistan is one of eight nations worldwide with stated nuclear weapons capability.

Its eastern neighbour and rival India, with whom it has fought three full-scale wars since both countries gained independence from Britain in 1947, also has nuclear weapons.

The Shaheen III is Pakistan’s longest-range missile system, developed with the intention of being capable of reaching Indian island territories to deny Indian forces the ability to establish a “second strike capability”, according to comments made by retired Lieutenant-General Khalid Kidwai, the former chief of Pakistan’s nuclear plans division in 2015.

“Chairman Joint Chiefs of Staff Committee asserted that Pakistan desires peaceful co-existence in the region and its strategic capability is to deter any aggression against the sovereignty of Pakistan,” said the military statement after Wednesday’s test.

Both South Asian countries routinely conduct missile tests, of which they notify the other in advance as per a 2005 bilateral missile test pact.

President Arif Alvi and Prime Minister Imran Khan congratulated the military and the scientists involved after the successful test.

Asad Hashim is Al Jazeera’s digital correspondent in Pakistan. He tweets @AsadHashim.

Pakistan successfully tests medium-range missile

Pakistan’s military did not say whether the test-fired Shaheen III missile was capable of carrying nuclear weapons.

The growing threat of the Chinese nuclear horn: Daniel 7

China to field more nuclear weapons that can target the United States, says report

by Gabriel Dominguez Jan 21, 2021, 09:24 AM

China’s missile force is expanding, with the number of nuclear warheads capable of reaching the United States on intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs) potentially…

China’s missile force is expanding, with the number of nuclear warheads capable of reaching the United States on intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs) potentially increasing to “well over 200” within the next five years, according to a report by the US Air Force’s National Air and Space Intelligence Center (NASIC).

Published on 11 January 2021, NASIC’s ‘2020 Ballistic and Cruise Missile Threat’ report says that China, which “continues to have the most active and diverse ballistic missile development programme in the world”, has been adding the 11,000+ km-range, single warhead DF-31A (US Department of Defense designation CSS-10 Mod 2) and the 12,000+ km-range DF-5B (CSS-4 Mod 3) to the inventory of the People’s Liberation Army Rocket Force (PLARF), with the silo-based DF-5B being China’s first ICBM with multiple independently-targetable re-entry vehicles (MIRVs).

Moreover, NASIC changed its designation for the DF-41 MIRV-capable, road-mobile ICBM from CSS-X-20 to CSS-20, indicating that it considers development of the weapon has been completed. The DF-41 was first displayed at a military parade held at Tiananmen Square in Beijing on 1 October 2019.

NASIC provided no range estimate for the three-stage, solid-fuelled missile but the DF-41 is believed to have a comparable range to the older liquid-fuelled DF-5B ICBM. The DF-41’s mobility, however, makes it less vulnerable to elimination in a first strike than the silo-based DF-5 missile.

NASIC has changed its designation for China’s DF-41 ICBM (seen here during the October 2019 military parade in Beijing) from CSS-X-20 to CSS-20, indicating that it considers development of the weapon has been completed. (Via CGTN video footage)

Pakistan Horn Test Ballistic Missile Before Joe Biden’s Presidential Inauguration: Daniel 8

Pakistan Test Ballistic Missile Before Joe Biden’s Presidential Inauguration

PAKISTAN Military Test Shaheen-3 Surface-to-Surface Ballistic Missile Hours Before Joe Biden’s Presidential Inauguration

Hours before the Biden-Harris inauguration, Pakistan has successfully tested its MRIV ballistic missile which has a maximum range of 2300km.

The missile is said to incorporate the latest Trace and Track Censors and can be loaded with more than one warhead meaning that the missile can destroy multiple targets.

The missile is guided through BidoPositioning Systems.

A tweet from the Official Spokesperson of the Pakistan Military shows the full capability of the ballistic missile, and a statement reads: “Pakistan conducted successful flight test of #Shaheen-3 surface 2 surface ballistic missile, having range of 2750 Kms. Flt test aimed @ revalidating various design & tech parameters of weapon system. President, PM, CJCSC & Services Chiefs have congratulated scientists & engineers.”

Today (January 20), Pope Francis appealed for all nations to work toward a world without nuclear weapons.

Speaking at his Wednesday General Audience, Pope Francis said that nuclear weapons “strike large numbers of people in a short space of time and provoke long-lasting damage to the environment,” expressing his desire for the country’s of the world to “work with determination to promote the conditions necessary for a world without nuclear arms”.

The best way to do this, added the Pope, is by “contributing to the advancement of peace and multilateral cooperation, which humanity greatly needs.”

The Chinese Nuclear Horn Prepares for the first nuclear war

World War 3 alert: China building huge road to move ‘heavy artillery’ towards rival border

CHINA has sparked World War 3 alarm by building a huge road to help transport “heavy artillery” to an enemy border.

By Richard Mark 10:00, Mon, Jan 18, 2021 | UPDATED: 20:46, Tue, Jan 19, 2021

A new 500-mile Karakoram highway will link Astore in northern Pakistan with Yakan Count in northwest China. It will provide a direct artery from China to a disputed region contested by fierce rival India.

The development is a sign Beijing has partnered up with nuclear-armed Pakistan to mount further pressure on India regarding the Himalayan border known as the Line of Actual Control (LAC) in the disputed province of Ladakh.

Indian military analysts told The Times of India the construction of the new road would add to China and Pakistan’s capacity to launch a two-front war against India.

India’s Foreign Minister S Jaishankar said China had increased its military presence in Ladakh, warning it had “undermined peace and tranquillity.”

He said the “government’s strategy at present was to hold the military line”.

China recently partnered with Pakistan to build a new road (Image: Reuters)

However, China said their Indian counterparts should immediately return one of their soldiers, who was arrested after crossing the border last week.

A statement from the People’s Liberation Army said: “India should strictly abide by the relevant agreements between the two countries, and promptly transfer the missing person to China, to help with cooling and de-escalating the China-Indian border situation.”

Tensions flared between China and India last June when a clash along the disputed Himalayan border led to the death of at least 20 Indian soldiers.

In the following months, the nuclear-armed neighbours deployed tens of thousands of soldiers across India’s Ladakh region and China’s Tibetan plateau.

India’s Minister of External Affairs S Jaishankar (Image: Getty)

In November, the two sides began formulating a disengagement plan to withdraw troops and establish no-patrol zones.

Both world superpowers fought a border war in 1962, but until last summer they had largely kept a lid on tensions along the LAC.

The Indian Foreign Minister continued: “After 45 years, you’ve actually had bloodshed on the border.

“And that’s had a huge impact on public opinion and politically. Really the impact of trust and confidence in India where China and their relationship is concerned.

China’s defence minister Wei Fenghe (Image: Getty )


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“That has been profoundly disturbed.”

India and China have also agreed to maintain close communication through diplomatic and military channels regarding the Line of Actual Control (LAC).

Anurag Srivastava, the Indian Ministry of External Affairs spokesperson said the two sides have agreed to hold another round of military talks regarding the issue.

He added: “India and China continue to maintain close communication through diplomatic and military channels with the objective of ensuring complete disengagement in all friction points along the LAC in the western sector.”

The Minister said the full aim was for “full restoration of peace and tranquillity.”

The Power of the Pakistani Nuclear Horn: Daniel 8

Pakistan Army ranks 10th most powerful army in the world

Pakistan’s army becomes the 10th most powerful army in the world according to the Global Firepower Index 2021 released this week.

Pakistan has improved 5 places in the same list since 2019. In 2020, Pakistan stood as the 15th most powerful country. Global Firepower Index is an annual ranking that ranks a country according to its military strength.

In the current list, Pakistan stands at the 10th spot out of 138 countries. It holds a PwrIndx* rating of 0.2083 (0.0000 considered ‘perfect’).

Pakistan Army was ranked the 15th most powerful military in the world, according to the same list issued in 2019.

The Global Firepower ranks the military forces of 138 countries by comparing and examining a wide range of factors and not just the numbers of soldiers or weapons deployed by a country.

The Global Firepower ranking mechanism involves scrutinizing a large variety of factors, which include the manpower, population, geography, diversity of weapons, and the state of development. Countries that are equipped with nuclear weapons get bonus points, however, the nuclear stockpiles of a country do not amount in the final score.

Countries that are equipped with naval fleets but lack diversity are penalized, however, landlocked countries that do not maintain navies are not penalized. The Global Firepower ranking creates the PowerIndex score for each country after examining more than 55 factors, and this ranking allows small and technologically advanced nations to compete with large countries that are less developed and advanced.

The heightened PowerIndex score is 0.0000, which is an unrealistic goal for any country. However, the closer a country is to this number, the more powerful it’s military.

According to Global Firepower’s ranking, Pakistan has an estimated total of 1,204,000 military personnel.

So Close to the First Nuclear War: Revelation 8

Pakistan PM says leaked DMs show Indian media ‘pushing nuclearised region to brink of conflict’

Mr Khan posted a thread on Twitter about the events of early 2019, in which the two countries’ air forces engaged in some of the worst clashes on the border in decades, with India bombing a target within Pakistani territory and Pakistan shooting down and capturing an Indian pilot.

The airstrikes at Balakot have been back in the news in India after a leaked WhatsApp conversation purporting to involve the firebrand right wing anchor Arnab Goswami appeared to show he had prior information about the attack, three days before it took place.

Pakistan’s prime minister said that the combination of India’s “dangerous military adventurism” and warmongering by the media risked pushing the two nuclear-armed neighbours to the “brink of conflict”.

Mr Khan said the Goswami chats were proof that Delhi had intended to use the Balakot strikes for political gain. Mr Modi went on to win a landslide second election victory in May 2019.

“In 2019, I spoke at UNGA (the UN General Assembly) on how India’s fascist Modi govt used the Balakot crisis for domestic electoral gains. Latest revelations from communication of an Indian journalist, known for his warmongering, reveal the unholy nexus between the Modi govt & Indian media,” Mr Khan tweeted.

India claimed at the time that its airstrikes on Pakistan-administered Kashmir’s Balakot region targeted a militant training camp in February 2019. The military operation was India’s retaliation to a separatist militant’s car bomb attack in its own region of Kashmir, the Pulwama bombing, that killed 40 paramilitary officers.

In the leaked WhatsApp chats, Goswami allegedly told a friend and chief executive of the TV ratings agency, Partho Dasgupta, that “something big will happen”.

When asked what it was related to, Goswami is reported to have said: “Pakistan. Something major will be done this time…” adding that it would be a “bigger than a normal strike”.

Mr Khan accused Mr Modi of doing anything to win the 2019 election – in this case whipping up anti-Pakistan sentiment – “in utter disregard for the consequences of destabilising the entire region”.

Pakistan’s foreign ministry echoed Mr Khan’s sentiments and said the chats vindicate their claims that the Modi government is staging “false flag operations”. It accused India of maligning Pakistan with allegations of terrorism and urged the international community to hold Delhi accountable for “endangering peace and security in South Asia”.

While Goswami has neither confirmed nor denied the veracity of the leaked WhatsApp chats, he did issue a statement in response to Mr Khan and the foreign ministry’s comments.

“India’s intention to hit back at Pakistan after the Pulwama attack was an officially stated position,” Goswami said. “There was no doubt in any nationalist Indian’s mind that we would hit back. Which we did.”

The WhatsApp conversations appear to have been made public as they form part of the Mumbai police’s investigations into alleged TV ratings rigging by Goswami’s Republic TV and others, and the anchor suggested that Pakistan and Mr Khan had “a hand in the conspiracy against” his channel.

“If the Prime Minister and Foreign Minister of Pakistan have come out in support of the malicious police action against the Republic (TV), then nothing much is left to be said,” he added.