More violence and death in Kashmir before the first nuclear war: Revelation 8

Seven to eight Pakistan Army soldiers killed in retaliatory firing by Indian Army

By Times Now

Seven to eight Pakistan Army soldiers killed in retaliatory firing by Indian Army in response to ceasefire violations from across Line of Control. The list of Pakistan Army soldiers killed includes two-three Pakistan Army Special Service Group (SSG) commandoes: Indian Army sources were quoted as saying by news agency ANI.

10-12 Pakistan Army soldiers were injured in the Indian Army firing in which a large number of Pakistan Army bunkers, fuel dumps, and launch pads have also been destroyed.

Pakistan Army carried out unprovoked ceasefire violations in multiple sectors from Uri to Gurez along the LoC in Jammu and Kashmir. Three Indian Army soldiers were killed in two separate locations in Jammu and Kashmir while foiling infiltration bids by Pakistan-backed terrorists and during ceasefire violation by Pakistan. While two soldiers were killed in Uri sector one was killed in the Gurez sector, Army sources said here.

“Four people who were injured during the ceasefire violation by Pakistan are admitted to the Uri sub-district hospital,” Reyaz Ahmad Malik, SDM Baramulla district told news agency ANI.

Northern Command issues statement: Full Text – 

“Pakistan initiated unprovoked Ceasefire Violation along the LoC spread across multiple sectors to include Dawar, Keran, Uri & Naugam. Pakistan used Mortars & other weapons. Pakistan deliberately targeted civilian areas.

Fear of the first nuclear war explodes: Revelation 8

Fears of TOTAL WAR in south Asia explode as Pakistan accuses India of backing terrorism

TENSIONS in south Asia are threatening to spiral out of control after both Pakistan and India presented dossiers to the UN Security Council accusing the other of stoking terrorism.

By James Bickerton 03:32, Wed, Nov 25, 2020 | UPDATED: 08:35, Wed, Nov 25, 2020

World War 3: Vision 2020 outlines plans for ‘full dominance’

The nuclear armed rivals have fought each other four times since independence, with three of the conflicts taking place over the disputed territory of Kashmir. India has faced an insurgency in Kashmir since 1989 from nationalist and Islamist elements which it has long accused Pakistan of stoking.

On Monday India submitted a dossier to the UN accusing Pakistan of systematically supporting terrorism within its territory.

One day later Pakistan submitted a similar document accusing India of backing terrorism in Pakistan.

Munir Akram, Pakistan’s UN ambassador, called on the international community to “take note of Indian terrorism and subversion against Pakistan and to prevail on India to desist from these illegal and aggressive activities”.

He claimed India is in violation of Security Council resolutions condemning terrorism and the UN Charter.

Pakistan and India have accused each other of backing terrorism at the UN (Image: GETTY)

Pakistan submitted a dossier on terrorism to the UN (Image: GETTY)

However an Indian spokesman fired back arguing it is Pakistan that has been backing terrorism.

He said: “Pakistan can cry hoarse from the rooftops.

“But they cannot change the fact that they are the epicentre of terrorism.

“Their lies have no takers.”

India and Pakistan have fought four wars since 1947 (Image: GETTY)

India and Pakistan have contested control of Jammu and Kashmir, a Muslim dominated region currently split between the two powers, since both became independent in 1947.

Last week India alleges four gunmen, from the Pakistan based group Jaish-e-Mohammad, crossed into Indian controlled Kashmir using a tunnel.

After being spotted they opened fire, though there are no reports of any casualties.

Pakistan has strongly denied any involvement in the attack.

India has been fighting an insurgency in Kashmir since 1989 (Image: GETTY)

“We have provided irrefutable evidence of India’s state sponsored terrorism” (Image: GETTY)

Earlier this month Imran Khan, Prime Minister of Pakistan, directly accused India of being involved with terrorism.

He commented: “We have provided irrefutable evidence of India’s state sponsored terrorism inside Pakistan.

“Details of financial & material support & Indian state’s direct involvement in terrorism have been given to the world which, in the face of this evidence, cannot remain indifferent or silent.

“We expect the international community to force India to end its terrorism & bring to justice those responsible for killing thousands of innocent people in Pakistan.

Pakistan: Emergency services respond to explosion in Karachi

“Our resilient & courageous security agencies & forces will continue to give their all to protect our people.”

The remarks were greeted with a firm denial by Indian authorities.

In February 2019 tensions between India and Pakistan exploded into armed clashes along their contested border.

Abhinandan Varthaman had his F15 shot down in February 2019 (Image: GETTY)

India conducted strikes inside Pakistan aimed at a militant group it blamed for a suicide car bombing which killed 40 Indian troops.

Pakistan retaliated and during the conflict an Indian F-15 fighter jet was shot down.

It’s pilot, wing commander Abhinandan Varthaman, was taken prisoner and later released back into Indian hands.

More Killings in Kashmir before the first nuclear war: Revelation 8

Pakistan: Soldier, four fighters killed in Afghan border attack

The Pakistani military said two soldiers were also injured during the raid in Pakistan’s North Waziristan.

Such incidents have raised fears that the Pakistani Taliban is regrouping [File: Saood Rehman/EPA]

Pakistan’s military has said a soldier and four rebel fighters have been killed in a shoot-out during a raid near the border with Afghanistan.

The military said two soldiers were also injured during the raid on Sunday in the Spinwam area of North Waziristan, in the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province.

North Waziristan served as a headquarters for local and foreign rebels until 2017, when the army said it had cleared the mountainous region of fighters following several operations. The region still sees sporadic attacks, mainly targeting security forces.

Such incidents have raised fears the Pakistani Taliban is regrouping.

Separately, in the disputed Himalayan region of Kashmir, a Pakistani official said Indian cross-border firing killed a seven-year-old girl and wounded 10 villagers.

Umar Azam, the deputy commissioner of Kotli district in Pakistani-administered Kashmir, said Pakistani troops returned fire across the border.

There was no immediate comment from India.

The fighting came amid increasing tensions between the nuclear-armed South Asian neighbours.

Earlier this month, Pakistani and Indian troops exchanged fire across the frontier, leaving 12 people dead, including three Indian and one Pakistani soldier, and wounding at least 36 on both sides. The fatalities were some of the highest reported in recent years.

A ceasefire has been in effect since 2003 across the length of the Line of Control, which divides Pakistan-administered and Indian-administered Kashmir, but it is frequently violated by both India and Pakistan, with each routinely blaming the other for initiating hostilities.

Both countries claim the disputed mountainous territory of Kashmir in full but administer separate portions of it. They have fought two of their three wars over the region since gaining independence from the British in 1947.

In 1948, the UN Security Council passed a resolution mandating that both sides cease hostilities to pave the way for a plebiscite where Kashmiris would be given the right to choose between joining either Pakistan or India.

Accusations before the first nuclear war: Revelation 8

As Islamabad and New Delhi Spar for Influence in Afghanistan, Nuclear Rivals Trade Accusations

Afghan President Ashraf Ghani (R) welcomes the Prime Minister of Pakistan Imran Khan (2nd R) with a ceremony at the Presidential Palace in Kabul, Afghanistan, Nov. 19, 2020. (Afghan Presidency/Handout/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)

Arshad Mehmood

11/22/2020

Pakistan PM Khan, during Kabul visit, pledges support for peace process

(ISLAMABAD) Pakistan will fully support efforts to end violence and establish a durable peace in Afghanistan, Prime Minister Imran Khan said during his first visit to the war-torn country since taking office in 2018.

“There is no military solution to the conflict in Afghanistan and a negotiated political settlement is the only way forward for enduring peace, stability and prosperity in the country,” the Pakistani leader said during a one-day visit to Kabul on Thursday, reiterating his longstanding stance.

He spoke during a joint press conference with Afghan President Ashraf Ghani.

“After Afghanistan, Pakistan is the country most interested in peace in Afghanistan,” Khan continued. “Pakistan has played its role, first in getting the Taliban’s talks with the Americans started, and then on the intra-Afghan dialogue.

“We assure you that we will exceed your expectations,” Khan told the Afghan president.

Ghani, also addressing the press conference, said he had “a very productive engagement with Prime Minister Imran Khan.

“Our common objective is to take a leap of faith to overcome the distrust that has haunted our relationship,” Ghani continued. “A comprehensive political settlement for enduring peace within the framework of our values and our constitution is the future of Afghanistan.”

After Afghanistan, Pakistan is the country most interested in peace in Afghanistan. Pakistan has played its role, first in getting the Taliban’s talks with the Americans started, and then on the intra-Afghan dialogue

Khan and Ghani met one-on-one and discussed ways to strengthen ties between their countries.

Muhammed Sadiq, Pakistan’s special representative for Afghanistan, tweeted: “The meeting focused on further deepening the fraternal relations between the two countries, the Afghan peace process, and regional economic development and connectivity.”

Khan was accompanied by Foreign Minister Shah Mahmood Qureshi, the prime minister’s commerce adviser Razak Dawood and other senior officials.

Despite frequent minor clashes between their respective security forces, relations between the two countries have significantly improved during Khan’s time in office.

Ghani visited Pakistan in June 2019. He and Khan also held a bilateral meeting on the sidelines of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation summit in Mecca in May 2019. Senior officials from the countries have been meeting and visiting each other regularly in recent months.

Although relations between Pakistan and Afghanistan seem to be improving, Pakistani policymakers fear that India is trying to sabotage this trend.

Indian leadership has always accused Pakistan of harboring separatists in the disputed Kashmir region. On the other hand, Islamabad says Indian intelligence services are using Afghan territory to destabilize Pakistan, accusing New Delhi of being behind all acts of terrorism within the country.

In the latest recrimination on November 14, Qureshi and Maj. Gen. Babar Iftikhar, director-general of the media wing of the Pakistan Armed Forces, held a press conference in Islamabad and accused India of sponsoring terrorism to destabilize Pakistan and undermining its relations with China.

“Pakistan will present its evidence to the United Nations,” Qureshi said.

Babar said that “India was training, harboring, and launching terrorists into Pakistan, from 87 training camps: 66 in Afghanistan and 21 in India.”

Following the press conference, Khan wrote on Twitter: “We expect the international community to force India to end its terrorism & bring to justice those responsible for killing thousands of innocent people in Pakistan.”

The Indian Foreign Ministry dismissed the allegations as “fabricated” and “figments of the imagination.”

Relations between nuclear-armed neighbors have been hostile since the Partition in 1947. The countries have fought three wars and have a long, ongoing dispute over Kashmir.

To better understand the situation as both Pakistan and India try to grow their influence in Afghanistan, The Media Line spoke exclusively with prominent experts on South Asia.

Michael Kugelman, the deputy director of the Asia Program and senior associate for South Asia at the Wilson Center in Washington, told The Media Line that “India has had deep ties with all post-Taliban governments, including a nearly decade-old strategic partnership agreement with Afghanistan that entails generous amounts of economic assistance as well as training programs for the Afghan Armed Forces. So India has a strong incentive to maintain influence in Afghanistan.

New Delhi’s broader goal with its influence-building in Afghanistan is to crowd out Pakistan, which has its influence in the country that can be leveraged through its close ties to the Taliban,” he continued.

“India and Pakistan share few interests in Afghanistan, which is no surprise given the bitter rivalry between the two,” Kugelman said.

However, “they do, broadly speaking, support the idea of a more stable and peaceful Afghanistan, as this would give them more space for influence-building,” he added. “Both countries support some shared concrete goals like building infrastructure. Additionally, both countries fear the spillover effects of an Afghanistan at war, including terrorism, drug trade, refugee flows and more.”

Responding to another question from The Media Line, Kugelman said, “I can certainly envision a future conflict between India and Pakistan, but I see it breaking out over Kashmir, for example large, deadly attacks on Indian forces in Kashmir that India blames on Pakistan, sparking retaliation and counter-retaliations, as opposed to over Afghanistan.

“Any India-Pakistan conflict in Afghanistan would play out in the shadows, covertly, through proxy efforts by each side to work with local partners and push back against the other,” Kugelman said.

Adil Faroque, a defense analyst based in Rawalpindi, in Pakistan’s Punjab Province, told The Media Line that “Indians follow the philosophy of their political godfather Chanakya, who teaches them to maintain good relationships with their neighbor’s neighbor.

“India has no direct land link with Afghanistan, but adopting Chanakya’s philosophy, Indians further preach arm-twisting tactics using that neighbor[‘s territory as a base] to create its [India’s] hegemony and to destabilize Pakistan,” he said.

Chanakya, a teacher, philosopher, economist, jurist and royal adviser who wrote the political treatise the Arthashastra, a text dated to roughly between the third century BCE and the third century CE, is considered the pioneer of political science and economics in India.

Faroque continued, “Besides this political ideology, the economic interests of India also favor a policy of maintaining influence in Afghanistan with its huge iron ore reserves, which are critical to India’s huge steel industry.

“Both countries possess devastating weapons and the outcome of a [full-blown] war would be mutually assured destruction, and nobody wants that. However, this [rivalry in Afghanistan] could intensify the ongoing hybrid warfare between the countries, which is a mixture of proxy and disinformation warfare,” Faroque said.

Faisal Raja, an Islamabad-based defense analyst, told The Media Line “there is no doubt that India has been trying to destabilize Pakistan.

“The top priority of India is to create two-front security concerns for the Pakistani military establishment,” he said. “Pakistan has always been focused on the eastern front [with India], but since India has invested in Afghanistan, Pakistan’s western front has also become active and the Pakistan security forces are actively engaged there.

“Pakistan’s intelligence agencies have sufficient proofs that cross-border terrorist activities are being planned and executed on a massive scale from Afghan soil, spearheaded by various Indian intelligence agencies,” Raja said.

Rohit Sharma, a leading New Delhi-based political and security analyst, told The Media Line: “History shows that any instability in Afghanistan leads to an increase in terror activities in India.”

“In 1999, an Indian airplane was hijacked and taken to Kandahar [in Afghanistan], and India was forced to release Maulana Masood Azhar, the founder of Jaish-e-Mohammed, a banned Pakistani outfit. Masood subsequently led the terror activities in India and Kashmir,” Sharma said.

“Jaish training camps were run on Afghan soil and were fully managed by Pakistani Intelligence agencies, but after the collapse of the Taliban in 2001, these training camps were shifted to Pakistani-controlled Kashmir areas. India’s interest in countering such activities in Afghanistan is natural,” he added.

“India does not want to increase its influence but it wants to maintain good relations with Afghanistan,” Sharma said. “India is helping the Afghan government in rebuilding and reconstructing devastated infrastructure.

Sharma continued, “Pakistan has always been trying to sideline India when it comes to the Afghanistan peace process.

“In April 2020, India was excluded from UN-backed peace talks on Afghanistan. China, Iran, Pakistan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan were included in the list [of participants], but India was sidelined,” he said.

“It was no mere coincidence that India was excluded from the talks; it happened after extensive lobbying from Pakistan and China,” Sharma said.

He further told The Media Line that “India is a large, centuries-old market for Afghan traditional spices, dry fruits and saffron. India is also interested in investing in copper and some other metals.

“A war is not likely to happen between the two nuclear-armed neighbors, but there can be clashes of interests between India and Pakistan,” Sharma said.

“Tamanna Salikuddin, director of South Asia programs at the United States Institute of Peace in Washington, told The Media Line that “both India and Pakistan have shared historic and cultural ties with Afghanistan.

“In the last several decades, given the international military and development effort in Afghanistan, both India and Pakistan have had strong strategic and national security interests in the future of Afghanistan,” she continued.

“While Pakistan may object to India’s relationship and any form of presence in Afghanistan, and India objects to Pakistan’s influence in the peace process with the Taliban, over the years both countries have tacitly accepted these realities as a feature of the Afghan war,” Salikuddin added.

She noted that “Pakistan’s recently signed statement with Afghanistan acknowledges the need for Afghanistan to have a posture of ‘multi-alignment,’ pursuing friendly relations with various regional countries, alluding to Afghanistan’s relationship with India.”

“At the same time, Afghanistan and Pakistan in this statement pledge to pursue a relationship founded on predictability, transparency, mutual and full respect for one another’s sovereignty,” she said.

“Pakistan and India share an interest in seeing a peaceful and stable Afghanistan that does not bleed terrorism, instability or chaos into the region. Finding a workable path for the region to cooperate regarding Afghanistan’s prosperity and stability is essential for both India and Pakistan,” Salikuddin said.

More Killings in Kashmir Before the Nuclear War: Revelation 8

India says Pakistani shelling kills soldier in Kashmir

Associated PressNovember 21, 2020

SRINAGAR, India (AP) — The Indian army says one soldier was killed and another wounded by Pakistani shelling along the highly militarized frontier dividing Kashmir between the two rivals. An Indian army spokesperson accused Pakistani troops of firing mortar rounds and other weapons Saturday along the Line of Control in southern Rajouri district. He called the incident an unprovoked violation of a 2003 cease-fire accord and said that Indian troops retaliated. Pakistan did not comment immediately. The reported attack comes a week after nine civilians and six soldiers were killed as Indian and Pakistani soldiers exchanged artillery fire along the de facto border.

The Indian Nuclear Triad: Revelation 8

India’s Enhanced Strategic Nuclear Triad: Implications For South Asian Strategic Stability – OpEd

Haris Bilal Malik*November 17, 2020

Indian army’s BrahMos Mobile Autonomous Launchers, February 7, 2014 (Courtesy Anirvan Shukla)

Since the last few years, India has embarked on an extensive augmentation of its strategic nuclear capabilities. This is primarily inspired by its long-held desire to dominate the escalation ladder of the South Asian region and extend its strategic outreach.

The massive buildup of strategic nuclear capabilities is also part of India’s grand strategy that is intended towards achieving the status of global power. In pursuit of this, it has carried out an overwhelming enhancement of its nuclear capabilities aimed at completing a strategic nuclear triad. Furthermore, India has been maintaining an offensive nuclear force posture along with the provision of advanced delivery systems and platforms that are capable of firing nuclear missiles. In this regard, a very robust three-pronged nuclear force structure which includes land-based, air-launched, and submarine-launched nuclear missiles form the very basis of the Indian nuclear triad.

Specifically, this has become more significant given the Indian induction of sophisticated platforms to strengthen its existing nuclear triad. This is further aimed at both initiating the first strike option and ensuring a second-strike capability. India’s attempt to dominate the regional deterrence equilibrium by enhancing its nuclear triad would adversely affect the strategic stability of the South Asian region.

In simplistic terms, the nuclear triad is the ability to launch a nuclear offensive from various platforms and delivery systems at air, land, and undersea. This is aimed at ensuring a three-prong offensive nuclear force posture. Air platforms are a major source of delivering nuclear warheads. In this regard, initially, India had relied on its Jaguar and Mirage 2000 jets with the provision to deliver the air-launched nuclear missiles.

Later on, the Russian Sukhoi Su-30 jets were acquired by India which is also capable of delivering nuclear missiles. India has also reportedly modified 40 of these jets to carry the BrahMos supersonic cruise missiles, one of the fastest supersonic missiles currently available in the world. This has significantly enhanced India’s air-based nuclear capability. Since then, these jets have been projected as the backbone of the air component of the Indian nuclear triad.

Most recently, India has received the first five of its total 36 Rafale jets from France. It is widely believed that the Indian Rafales would likely be modified to play the nuclear role. Since, along with its other advanced strikes capabilities, Rafale is well known to be capable of delivering a nuclear payload. Especially against the backdrop of the humiliation which India has faced in recent crises, the addition of Rafale in the Indian Air Force (IAF’s) inventory would further complement the air-based component of the Indian nuclear triad.

In the same vein, India’s land-based component of the nuclear triad consists of offensive missile systems capable of delivering nuclear warheads at various ranges. In this regard, most notably, the Agni and Prithvi missiles are India’s fully operational land-based nuclear-capable ballistic missiles. Especially the Agni missiles are believed to be the backbone of the Indian land-based nuclear capability. The Agni-V and Agni-VI variants of this series are reportedly Inter-Continental Ballistic Missile (ICBMs). The Agni-V of 5000 km range is in service, whereas the Agni-VI of 10000 km range is under development. This shows Indian eagerness to complete an ICBM ranged land-based component of its nuclear triad.

In addition to these, there has been much hype regarding the land launched version of the BrahMos supersonic cruise missile which India has developed in collaboration with Russia. The BrahMos missile is also capable of delivering nuclear warheads with its incredible speed. India also aspires to have hypersonic nuclear-capable cruise missiles as part of its land-based nuclear capability. In this regard, the recent tests of the Shaurya ballistic missile and Hypersonic Technology Demonstrator Vehicle (HSTDV) for future cruise missiles are considerably important.

Furthermore, there are also reports which suggest that India and Russia are jointly working on the BrahMos-II a hypersonic variant of this cruise missile. Though the practicality of this might remain questionable, such developments indicate that India wants to further enhance the land-based component of its nuclear triad.

It is worth mentioning here that the provision of nuclear first-strike and assurance of second-strike capability undersea is the most credible component for the completion of a nuclear triad. The naval based component appears to be the Indian priority as well. This is evident from the Indian enhancements of its naval based nuclear deterrent capabilities with the provision of nuclear-powered and ballistic missile-carrying submarines (SSBNs) and submarine-launched ballistic missiles (SLBMs).

In this regard, the presence of the INS Arihant SSBN and the K-series SLBMs in the Indian naval inventory are worth considering. Especially, the K-serious has tremendous significance for India’s sea-based nuclear capability aimed at completing the nuclear triad. These include; the K-15 missile (the land-based version of Sagarika missile) with a range of 700 km and the K-4 missile of 3500 km range. The long-range K-5 and K-6 missiles of 5000 and 6000 km are also under development.

Along with these, the INS Arighat, India’s second SSBN as reported is set to be deployed by the end of 2020. It is also believed to be capable of carrying more nuclear-capable missiles as compared to the INS Arihant. These platforms have considerably enhanced India’s naval based second-strike capability and further ensured the completion of a strategic nuclear triad.

Hence at the present, India seeks to maintain a credible and reliable strategic nuclear triad in pursuit of its hegemonic designs and great power aspiration. India’s nuclear triad is in large part ensured by its offensive enhancement of air, land, and undersea nuclear capabilities. Such an Indian attempt to dominate the regional deterrence equation would likely further increase the risk of instability in the region. These factors combined would have long-lasting implications for the overall regional deterrence equilibrium that is primarily ensured by Pakistan’s nuclear capability. Though, Pakistan still holds a very calculated and principled minimum credible deterrence approach, Indian eagerness to expand its nuclear triad would likely challenge the nuclear threshold of Pakistan. This would ultimately undermine the strategic and deterrence equilibrium in South Asia.

*The writer currently works as a Research Associate at the Strategic Vision Institute (SVI) in Islamabad, Pakistan.

More Killings Before the First Nuclear War: Revelation 8

A local resident on Friday holds the remains of a mortal shell allegedly fired by the Indian Army in Jura and Shahkot village, Pakistan.

Photo: EPA-EFE

India-Pakistan shelling leaves at least 13 dead

ARTILLERY BATTLE: Both sides accuse each other of an ‘unprovoked’ attack that came five days after six people were killed along the ceasefire line separating the nations

AFP, SRINAGAR, India

Indian and Pakistani forces on Friday waged their biggest artillery battle of the past year, leaving more than 13 dead and dozens wounded on both sides of their disputed Kashmir frontier, officials said.

Artillery and machine gun clashes were reported all along the 740km Line of Control that has separated the nuclear-armed rivals for the past seven decades, officials from the two sides said.

Hundreds of villagers were moved away from the ceasefire line in Indian-controlled territory, while Pakistani officials said that dozens of homes were set ablaze by Indian shelling on their side.

The new peak in tensions came only five days after three Indian soldiers and three militants were killed in an exchange along the ceasefire line.

India is also involved in a border showdown with the China in the Himalayas.

The latest fighting erupted early on Friday, with the two sides accusing each other of launching “unprovoked” assaults, and shells were still being fired into the night, residents said.

“Pakistan used mortars and other weapons” and “deliberately targeted civilian areas,” the Indian Army said in a statement.

Four Indian troops and four civilians, including an eight-year-old boy, were killed, army and police spokesmen said. At least 12 security forces and civilians were wounded.

On the other side, Raja Farooq Haider, prime minister of Azad Kashmir, the Pakistani-controlled part of the region, said that five people were killed and 31 wounded in the intense shelling in the Neelum and Jhelum valleys.

The Pakistani military confirmed the one of the dead was a soldier.

“For how long [do] we have to bear such colossal losses?” Haider said in a tweet directed at Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan.

Indian officers said that the fighting was sparked when militants tried to cross into Indian-controlled territory at the northern end of the ceasefire line.

Indian troops “retaliated strongly, causing substantial damage to the Pakistan army’s infrastructure and casualties,” the Indian Army said, adding that ammunition dumps and forward bases had been hit.

The two sides regularly stage artillery duels across the ceasefire line and invariably blame each other.

Kashmir has been divided between the two countries since their separation in 1947. It has been a cause of two of their three wars since then.

Both countries claim the whole of the Himalayan region, where India is also fighting an insurgency that has left tens of thousands dead since 1989.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi was to visit troops in a border area yesterday for Diwali, the biggest Hindu holiday of the year, according to media reports.

Modi, who portrays himself as tough on security, has spent every Diwali with the military since becoming the country’s leader in 2014.

Modi launched what he called “surgical strikes” inside Pakistani Kashmir in 2016 after militants attacked an Indian base, killing 19 soldiers.

The neighbors last year staged air strikes against each other after a suicide bomber killed 40 Indian troops.

Pakistan and India Accelerate to the First Nuclear War: Revelation 8

Homes were left ruined following the shelling between the two nuclear powers

Pakistan and India clashes leave 12 dead as nuclear-armed neighbours exchange fire and terrified civilians flee

Chris Bradford

PAKISTANI and Indian troops have clashed in the disputed territory of Kashmir, leaving at least 12 people dead and terrified civilians fleeing for their lives.

Tensions have been rising between the South Asian nuclear neighbours ever since they gained independence from Britain in 1947, making the Himalayan region one of the world’s flashpoints.

Homes were left ruined following the shelling between the two nuclear powersCredit: AFP or licensors
A child injured in a mortal shell that was allegedly fired by the Indian army across the Line of Control in Kashmir

A child injured in a mortal shell that was allegedly fired by the Indian army across the Line of Control in KashmirCredit: EPA

Pakistan and India have fought two of their three wars over Kashmir, which is split between them and is claimed by both in its entirety. 

Pakistani military and government officials have accused India of launching the assault after allegedly firing rockets and mortal shells yesterday.

It’s reported that a Pakistani soldier, five civilians were killed and at least 27 were injured. 

The fatalities were some of the highest reported in years. 

Sardar Masood Khan, the leader of the Pakistani-administered Kashmir, admitted he feared a wider conflict. 

“If such Indian hostilities are not stopped, then it will also be difficult to stop a war between Pakistan and India,” he said.

Pakistan’s military described the attack as the latest unprovoked cease-fire violation by India and said Pakistani troops responded by targeting Indian posts.

“People are running for safety in panic and India is deliberately targeting the civilian population,” Raja Shahid Mahmood, a government official, told the Associated Press.

Kashmir is a highly contested region in the Himalayas with both Pakistan and India claiming its entiretyKashmir is a highly contested region in the Himalayas with both Pakistan and India claiming its entiretyCredit: EPA
The shelling left civilians fleeing for their livesThe shelling left civilians fleeing for their livesCredit: Reuters
A resident holds the remains of a mortal shell that was allegedly fired across the Line of Control, the de-facto border between Pakistan-administered Kashmir and Indian-administered KashmirA resident holds the remains of a mortal shell that was allegedly fired across the Line of Control, the de-facto border between Pakistan-administered Kashmir and Indian-administered KashmirCredit: EPA

Several homes have also been damaged. 

“Villagers were hiding in the community bunkers as the exchange of fire intensifed,” he said.

In Srinagar, the capital of India-controlled Kashmir, three Indian soldiers were killed and three others were wounded. 

Cops said that three Indian civilians, including a woman, were killed by Pakistani shelling.

Both nuclear powers have blamed each other for initiating the recent assault. 

Pakistan’s military claimed India launched the assault after four Indian soldiers died fighting Kashmiri rebels in the Indian-controlled Kapwara district. 

“Pakistan stands committed to defend the motherland and our Kashmiri brethren, even at the cost of blood and lives,” they said.

Rebels have been fighting against Indian rule since 1989 as most Muslim Kashmiris believe that the territory should be united under Pakistani rule or be an independent country in its own right. 

India and Pakistan have fought three wars – in 1947, 1965 and 1971. Two of which were over Kashmir.

The Line of Control splits Kashmir into Indian and Pakistan-administered territories, and a ceasefire between the two nations has been in place since 2003.

Pakistan’s foreign ministry claims that the ceasefire has been violated by India at least 2,729 times this year, resulting in 21 civilian deaths, and serious injuries to 206 others, Al Jazeera reports.ince they gained independence from Britain in 1947, making the Himalayan region one of the world’s flashpoints.

Homes were left ruined following the shelling between the two nuclear powersCredit: AFP or licensors

A child injured in a mortal shell that was allegedly fired by the Indian army across the Line of Control in KashmirCredit: EPA

Pakistan and India have fought two of their three wars over Kashmir, which is split between them and is claimed by both in its entirety.

Pakistani military and government officials have accused India of launching the assault after allegedly firing rockets and mortal shells yesterday.

It’s reported that a Pakistani soldier, five civilians were killed and at least 27 were injured.

The fatalities were some of the highest reported in years.

Sardar Masood Khan, the leader of the Pakistani-administered Kashmir, admitted he feared a wider conflict.

“If such Indian hostilities are not stopped, then it will also be difficult to stop a war between Pakistan and India,” he said.

Pakistan’s military described the attack as the latest unprovoked cease-fire violation by India and said Pakistani troops responded by targeting Indian posts.

“People are running for safety in panic and India is deliberately targeting the civilian population,” Raja Shahid Mahmood, a government official, told the Associated Press.

Kashmir is a highly contested region in the Himalayas with both Pakistan and India claiming its entiretyCredit: EPA

The shelling left civilians fleeing for their livesCredit: Reuters

A resident holds the remains of a mortal shell that was allegedly fired across the Line of Control, the de-facto border between Pakistan-administered Kashmir and Indian-administered KashmirCredit: EPA

Several homes have also been damaged.

“Villagers were hiding in the community bunkers as the exchange of fire intensifed,” he said.

In Srinagar, the capital of India-controlled Kashmir, three Indian soldiers were killed and three others were wounded.

Cops said that three Indian civilians, including a woman, were killed by Pakistani shelling.

Both nuclear powers have blamed each other for initiating the recent assault.

Pakistan’s military claimed India launched the assault after four Indian soldiers died fighting Kashmiri rebels in the Indian-controlled Kapwara district.

“Pakistan stands committed to defend the motherland and our Kashmiri brethren, even at the cost of blood and lives,” they said.

Rebels have been fighting against Indian rule since 1989 as most Muslim Kashmiris believe that the territory should be united under Pakistani rule or be an independent country in its own right.

India and Pakistan have fought three wars – in 1947, 1965 and 1971. Two of which were over Kashmir.

The Line of Control splits Kashmir into Indian and Pakistan-administered territories, and a ceasefire between the two nations has been in place since 2003.

Pakistan’s foreign ministry claims that the ceasefire has been violated by India at least 2,729 times this year, resulting in 21 civilian deaths, and serious injuries to 206 others, Al Jazeera reports.

The First Nuclear War is Coming: Revelation 8

Shehryar Afridi sees nuclear war with India likely if Kashmir issue not resolved

ISLAMABAD: AJK President Sardar Masood Khan has said the Islamic renaissance could only save Muslims in Southeast Asia.

He was presiding over the international Kashmir Convention hosted by the World Kashmir Forum here Tuesday. Giving a graphic picture of occupied Kashmir, Sardar Masood Khan questioned what would happen if a brutal force comprising 900,000 men invades any city of Pakistan.

He said there was disequilibrium in policies of India and Pakistan on Kashmir as India has invaded the Jammu and Kashmir utilising all facets of maneuvering.

He suggested a diplomatic and economic war by Pakistan and Pakistanis against India. The AJK president said it’s high time that concerted efforts were made using all communication sectors to highlight the sufferings of Kashmiris and the brutalities of Indian occupied forces in Held Kashmir.

Parliamentary Kashmir Committee Chairman Shehryar Afridi, the chief guest of the gathering, said Kashmiris were constantly giving a wake-up call to the whole world over grave human rights violations by India in occupied Kashmir. He warned, “Pakistan and India may head to nuclear war if Kashmir dispute is not amicably resolved.”

“The UN and the world need to immediately take practical steps to resolve Kashmir dispute to help avoid a nuclear war in the region where three nuclear neighbours – Pakistan, India and China are involved in border disputes,” Afridi said.

The Kashmir Committee chairman called upon the UN experts on human rights and freedom of expression to make an immediate intervention into the Indian government’s illegal transfer of 2.4 lakh kanals of land in Indian Illegally Occupied Jammu and Kashmir (IIOJK) to industries and commerce divisions of India. Afridi said behold as the government is devising a comprehensive strategy to tackle the fight for Kashmir cause. He said all political parties are on the same page on two issues, nuclear and Kashmir. “No one can dare compromise on these issues”.

Afridi said Kashmiris are humans and not children of lesser God, so the sole responsibility of Pakistan is to listen to the voice of oppressed ones. WKF Chairman Haji Mohammad Rafiq Pardesi said the plight of Kashmiris was giving us sleepless nights and called for responsible and prudent steps to end the miseries of Kashmiris.

He urged the world as well as the United Nations for providing self-determination as promised to Kashmiris. Pardesi condemned Modi’s illegal actions in occupied Kashmir, saying he was rightly called the “Butcher of Gujarat”. The WKF chairman urged the masses to duly sign the WKF petition they are preparing to present to the UN Security Council. The WKF chief was passionate enough to offer the Pakistan’s government that if it resolves the Kashmir and Palestine disputes along with UN amicably then there will be no harm if Pakistan officially accepts the Israel state.

Former federal secretary and WKF vice chairman Kunwar Dilshad said voice of Kashmiris cannot be suppressed and it would be underlined across the world under Prime Minister Imran Khan. He praised WKF and especially Haji Mohammad Rafiq Pardesi for holding a significant event.

Chairperson Jammu and Kashmir Solidarity Movement and Pak Kashmir Women Alliance Uzma Gul said in 15 months of siege around 11,000 Kashmiris have been martyred or mutilated by occupying Indian forces.

The Kashmiri leader said it is very depressing that the governments of Pakistan and Azad Kashmir were not doing much for Kashmir cause. She stressed rising above politics, personal benefits and not only doing lip-service but making efforts for tangible results.

Gul emphasised for pragmatic diplomatic efforts and proactive role of Kashmiri diaspora, saying independent Kashmir stance would damage the main cause. Giving suggestions, she said a movement in Azad Kashmir under UN charter would boost the morale of Kashmiris in occupied Kashmir. She also lauded the newly-released Pakistan map.

Ex-ambassador and analyst Javed Hafiz said Maharaja Hari Singh signed accession instrument when he was not in control of the Kashmir state so it no longer belonged to him but Kashmiri people.

Lt-Gen Naeem Khalid Lodhi (retd) said peaceful resolution of the Kashmir issue is related to lasting peace in the region. “Global peace would suffer if this crisis is not dealt with deserving attention by the world powers.

Former high commissioner Abdul Basit in his address regretted the silence of the world community over miseries of Kashmiris. He felt that cul-de-sac has been reached on this lingering issue.

WKF secretary general and former attorney general of Pakistan Justice Anwar Mansoor Khan (retd) highlighted the legal and justified stance of Pakistan on the Kashmir issue. He underlined breach of peace in August 2019 by India on ‘administered’ Kashmir.

He said India has violated all bilateral agreements and international conventions on Kashmir issue, but Pakistan wants peace and not war, resolving the conflict peacefully. Guests were also presented Kashmiri shawls by the WKF chairman. Event was attended by Dr Philipp Deichman – Minister Counsellor, Deputy Head of Mission, Germany, Ahmed Rabei – ambassador, embassy of the State of Palestine, Mthuthuzeli Madikiza – high commissioner, South Africa, and diplomat from the embassy of Turkey. The gathering concluded with a heart-warming “Dua” offered by Saylani Welfare Trust Chairman Maulana Bashir Farooqi.

Biden Will NOT be better for Pakistan: Daniel 8

Joe Biden speaks at his election party. REUTERS

Will Biden be better for Pakistan?

Unconventional style of Trump helped Islamabad establish a direct link with White House

ISLAMABAD:

As Joe Biden was elected as the 46th president of the United States, the world capitals including Islamabad have begun assessing to figure out what to expect from Washington under the new president on the foreign policy front.

Authorities in Pakistan are already doing their homework to deal with the possible changes with the arrival of 78-year-old Biden, who is a foreign policy veteran. Although Pakistan’s relationship remained stable after initial hiccups during President Donald Trump’s four-year term, officials told The Express Tribune that Biden’s election would bring more predictability.

Afghanistan has remained at the centre of Pakistan-US ties. It was Pakistan’s role in brokering the US-Taliban deal that helped the Trump administration to lower the rhetoric against Islamabad. The unconventional style of Trump’s presidency helped Pakistan establish a direct link with the White House.

People like Senator Lindsay Graham, considered a close aide of Trump, played a major role in arranging Prime Minister Imran Khan’s White House visit and his subsequent meetings with Trump.

That luxury will not be available as President-elect Biden would return to the traditional style of governance, relying more on the State Department and Pentagon. But Pakistani decision makers see certain positives that Biden would bring as the US president.

“Under Biden, the US will not hasten the troop withdrawal from Afghanistan,” said a Pakistani official while requesting anonymity. This, the official added, is what Pakistan has been advocating for long.

Any hasty withdrawal will only compound the problems and potentially throw Afghanistan into anothercycle of civil war, the official pointed out. The US and Afghan Taliban signed a landmark deal on February 29 in Doha after several months of painstaking negotiations.

The deal envisages a road- map for the US troops withdrawal from Afghanistan in return for the Taliban agreeing not to allow its soil to be used again by terrorist groups.

Biden also favours the US troops pullout but in a gradual and orderly man- ner. He supports the idea of maintaining certain number of troops for counter terrorism. Pakistan as well as other regional players and immediate neighbours of Afghanistan are supportive of this approach. Biden has not yet announced his team but some observers feel that he may retain Ambassador Zalmay Khalilzad as special representative for Afghanistan.

“Overall Biden is a better bet than maverick and unpredictable Trump,” commented another official while reacting to Biden’s victory.

There is a sense in Islamabad that Biden, unlike Trump, would be vocal on the human rights situation in the disputed Jammu and Kashmir region.

“Traditionally, Democrats have always laid more emphasis on human rights, so we expect that the new president will not ignore the situation in Kashmir,” the official hoped. Observers, however, feel Biden’s criticism against India will not cross certain lines as the US needs India to contain China.

He (Biden) has a tilt towards India. There will not be change in terms of US policy towards India,” remarked Abdul Basit, former ambassador to India. He recalled that Biden as the Senate Foreign Relations Committee chair-man was instrumental in the Indo-US nuclear deal.

But officials reminded that Biden also sought a long term relationship with Pakistan.

They referred to the Kerry-Lugar Bill which was coauthored by Biden. TheKerry-Lugar initiative tripled non-military aid to Pakistan. Nevertheless, there is a consensus among analysts and retired diplomats that the nature of the relationship between Pakistan and the US would depend on how Islamabad presents itself to the world.

Pakistan needs to create avenues other than Afghanistan that encourage the US to view ties beyond the security prism, they stressed.