Kissinger, The Prophecy Is Inevitable (Revelation)

IMG_2068.JPGHenry Kissinger: Is nuclear catastrophe inevitable?
By James Lewis
Henry Kissinger, who is still (to my mind) the wisest foreign policy analyst in the land, just wrote a Wall Street Journal piece called “A path out of Middle East Collapse.”
Today that article is being carefully analyzed all over the world.
Kissinger’s most crucial point: “If nuclear weapons become established (in the Middle East), a catastrophic outcome is nearly inevitable.”
Well, Obama and Europe have just handed the nuclear key to Iran, and Saudi Arabia is shopping for its own. Pakistan is selling. Are we in “inevitable catastrophe” territory yet?
Our delusional liberals have been whistling past that graveyard to protect Obama. But the next president won’t have that option. Putin just said that “some American politicians have mush for brains,” and that isn’t just braggadocio.
Dr. K starts with the disastrous collapse of the power balance in the Middle East. And because he writes in long, thought-provoking sentences, it’s worth focusing on some of his high points.
1. “With Russia in Syria, a geopolitical structure that has lasted four decades is in shambles.”
2. Four Arab states have ceased to function: Libya, Syria, Iraq, and Yemen. All are at risk of being taken over by ISIS, which aims to become a global caliphate governed under shariah law.
3. The U.S. and the West need a coherent strategy. We don’t have one now.
4. Treating Iran as a normal power is wishful thinking. It could happen over time. But today, Iran “is taking on an Armageddon dimension.”
Israel is in the maelstrom, but so is the rest of the world, which is why Russia is making an unprecedented military intervention in Syria. Putin is protecting Russia first of all.
5. “So long as ISIS survives and remains in control of a geographically defined territory, it will compound Middle East tensions… The destruction of ISIS is more urgent than the overthrow of Bashar Assad.”
6. “The US has already acquiesced in a Russian military role.” (Vladimir Putin has suggested a new Russo-Western alliance, on the World War II model.)
Given the general failure of political will in the West, combined with Putin’s strategic clarity, a practical alliance could work.
Dr. Kissinger didn’t say it, but Putin has been watching jihadist forces on his southern border come closer and closer to nuclear weapons. Putin rose to the top by fighting jihadist Chechens, in Russia’s usual merciless fashion. Today, thousands of Chechens have joined ISIS in Iraq and Syria, and may go back to fight in Russia and China.
Imagine thousands of suicidal fanatics on our southern border, and you get the picture as seen from Moscow.
Bottom line: To avoid the “catastrophe” of a hot nuclear arms race in the Middle East, a practical alliance of the West with Russia might save the world.

China Preparing For Nuclear War

Report: Chinese PLA “Making Preparations” For War With U.S.

Beijing responds to USS Vinson patrolling South China Sea

An op-ed for the Global Times, which is widely regarded as the voice of the Chinese government, references U.S. intelligence assessments that China has “nearly finished building almost two dozen military structures on artificial islands in the South China Sea” in order to deploy long-range surface-to-air missiles.
The article also highlights comments by Vice Admiral Joseph Aucoin, commander of US 7th Fleet, that the United States is unequivocally “prepared to fight if necessary,” questioning why the U.S. is making “direct military threats” against China.
However, those threats are returned in kind, with Beijing insisting that it will accelerate its military build-up if U.S. officials keep making “condescending” comments.
“If the US military insists on showing that it is capable of taming the China Dragon, they are bound to see all kinds of advanced Chinese weapons as well as other military deployments on the islands,” states the piece.
“US generals said they are ready to fight when necessary. The People’s Liberation Army is also making preparations.”
Earlier today Chinese officials also made it clear that they oppose the deployment of the USS Vinson, asserting that the ship was in the region to conduct surveillance.
Last month, Beijing reacted to Secretary of State Rex Tillerson’s comments that the Obama administration had been weak on allowing China to expand operations in the South China Sea by claiming his comments could lead to a “military clash”.
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Paul Joseph Watson is the editor at large of Infowars.com and Prison Planet.com.

China Warns Babylon The Great Of Nuclear War

Philippine Daily Inquirer / 12:58 AM January 14, 2017
BEIJING—China is warning the United States of a nuclear war if the American government puts meat into a statement made by incoming US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson that the Chinese should be prevented from occupying artificial islands they built in parts of the South China Sea that China is disputing with the Philippines and other countries.
In an editorial, the Communist Party mouthpiece Global Times said Tillerson better “bone up on nuclear power strategies if he wants to force a big nuclear power to withdraw from its own territories.”
Foolish approach
“Unless Washington plans to wage a large-scale war in the South China Sea, any other approaches to prevent Chinese access to the islands will be foolish,” said the Global Times, which is believed to represent the thinking of hawkish members of the Communist Party of China.
Tillerson, former ExxonMobile chief executive officer, told US senators that he would seek to deny Beijing access to the artificial islands that China has been building in the South China Sea.
China’s actions in the region are comparable to Russia’s invasion of Crimea, he said, a comment that did not sit well with the nuclear-armed Asian giant.
‘Devastating’ clash
If Tillerson acted on his threats, Chinese state-owned China Daily warned “it would set a course for devastating confrontation between China and the US.”
Satellite photos show China has been hard at work building military facilities in the contested waters, which are also claimed by the Philippines and Vietnam, among other claimants.
Under US President Barack Obama, Washington has claimed Beijing’s activities in the region threaten freedom of navigation and overflight through the commercially and strategically vital waters.
But Obama has not taken a position on the ownership of the islets, reefs and shoals that sit in one of the world’s hot spots.
Tillerson, however, explicitly said that the territories “are not rightfully China’s.” —AFP

China Prepared To Nuke America

Tareq Haddad By Tareq Haddad
January 13, 2017 02:06 GMT
The ‘Jin’ Type 094A has a large ‘hump’ concealing 12 submarine-launched ballistic missiles known as ‘big waves’, with a range of over 11,000km (6,835m).
They are believed to be China’s new generation of intercontinental-range ballistic missiles, the JL-3, the South China Morning Post reported.
First seen last year, it is claimed the vessels have been secretly modified to make them more aerodynamic in the water.
The new missile could reach virtually the entire United States without leaving the heavily defended Yulin Naval Base (itself complete with underground shelters and docks for submarines) in Hainan Island,” Popular Science stated.
“This vessel’s ability to reach global targets while lurking in heavily defended coastal waters will significantly boost China’s second strike capability (that is, the ability of a nuclear power to launch a retaliatory nuclear attack even after suffering a devastating conventional or nuclear attack).”
Though much of China’s nuclear arsenal is unknown, the Federation of American Scientists estimated the state has roughly 260 warheads.
However, it is thought China holds a policy of maintaining a minimum deterrent with a no-first-use pledge.
The communist state is also one of five countries considered “nuclear-weapon states”, that have signed the Treaty on Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons. The US, the UK, France and Russia are also a party to the treaty.
The US Security Review Commission (USSRC) believes China is trying to expand its arsenal to rival US dominance.
In a May 2016 report, Jordan Wilson, policy analyst at the USSRC, said: “The Chinese Communist Party perceives that its legitimacy in the eyes of China’s citizens is based, in part, on its ability to demonstrate that it is capable of strengthening the nation and safeguarding China’s territorial interests and claims.
“Yet the CCP leadership believes the United States’ presence in the Asia Pacific could interfere with its ability to defend these interests and claims if a regional crisis were to arise.
“This concern has prompted Beijing to develop conventional missile capabilities to target US military facilities in the Asia Pacific in general, and Guam in particular, in order to expand China’s options and improve its capacity to deter or deny US intervention during such a crisis.”

China Horn Threatens Babylon the Great

Philippine Daily Inquirer / 12:58 AM January 14, 2017
In an editorial, the Communist Party mouthpiece Global Times said Tillerson better “bone up on nuclear power strategies if he wants to force a big nuclear power to withdraw from its own territories.”
Foolish approach
“Unless Washington plans to wage a large-scale war in the South China Sea, any other approaches to prevent Chinese access to the islands will be foolish,” said the Global Times, which is believed to represent the thinking of hawkish members of the Communist Party of China.
Tillerson, former ExxonMobile chief executive officer, told US senators that he would seek to deny Beijing access to the artificial islands that China has been building in the South China Sea.
China’s actions in the region are comparable to Russia’s invasion of Crimea, he said, a comment that did not sit well with the nuclear-armed Asian giant.
‘Devastating’ clash
If Tillerson acted on his threats, Chinese state-owned China Daily warned “it would set a course for devastating confrontation between China and the US.
Satellite photos show China has been hard at work building military facilities in the contested waters, which are also claimed by the Philippines and Vietnam, among other claimants.
Under US President Barack Obama, Washington has claimed Beijing’s activities in the region threaten freedom of navigation and overflight through the commercially and strategically vital waters.
But Obama has not taken a position on the ownership of the islets, reefs and shoals that sit in one of the world’s hot spots.
Tillerson, however, explicitly said that the territories “are not rightfully China’s.” —AFP
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China Horn Expands Its Nuclear Power

Several reports leading into the new year have shown China becoming more militarily assertive in the Pacific, not to mention a bit more confrontational toward the United States regarding diplomatic, military, and economic relations — all cause for some to fear the advent of a possible nuclear confrontation and/or World War 3. What with the diplomatic faux pas of President-elect Donald Trump conversing with Taiwan president Tsai Ing-wen after winning the U.S. presidential election (therefore acknowledging, even inadvertently, the legitimacy of the Taiwanese government, which the government in Beijing does not) adding more strain to the U.S.-China relationship following the harsh tone set by candidate Trump during and after his campaign, China has started flexing its military muscles in the west Pacific and followed-up with sabre-rattling from its state-affiliated press. But is all the rhetoric, political posturing, and military showmanship just that, or, as some suspect, cause to worry about a possible regional war — or, worse, a more inclusive internationally fought World War 3 — between the U.S. and China?
The Daily Express reported last week that China had sent a “war fleet” into the South China Sea recently. Although the official China stance is that the ships are all part of routine military exercises, experts eyed the naval maneuvers, where an aircraft carrier and five other Chinese naval vessels skirted the coast of Taiwan (by 90 nautical miles, or over 103 land miles), as a move by China to assert its dominance in the South China Sea. Beijing already claims much of the territory, an important area where international shipping lanes see over $5 trillion in trade each year.
Statements concerning the small fleet made by China’s state-run newspaper, the Global Times, were ambiguous and confrontational at the same time.
“The Chinese fleet will cruise to the Eastern Pacific sooner or later. When China’s aircraft carrier fleet appears in offshore areas of the U.S. one day, it will trigger intense thinking about maritime rules.”
China has been expanding and modernizing its military capabilities over the past decade, but a heavy interest has been shown its growing navy. In recent years, the country has also entered into territorial conflicts with neighboring nations over areas of the South China Sea. There has also been reports of China fortifying and manning man-made islands in the area. Earlier this year, China held “war games” exercises off the coast of Japan that China maintained were just scheduled maneuvers and not meant to be aggressive. However, as the Daily Star reported, Japan was warned to stay away from the disputed region and that China would “not hesitate” to take military action.
But as territorial and maritime tensions have mounted, so, too, has the tensions in the diplomatic arena. Besides President-elect Donald Trump’s mishandling of the delicate one-nation situation with regard to China, he also has accused China of stealing an American military drone. As the Inquisitr reported in December, the Chinese navy picked up an underwater drone in the South China Sea. While China admitted to acquiring the drone, Beijing maintained it had been in constant contact with Washington about the incident. The state-run press accused Trump and the U.S. media of sensationalizing a story that was not that serious.
Trump had tweeted, “China steals United States Navy research drone in international waters — rips it out of water and takes it to China in unprecedented act.”
He would later take to Twitter again and tell China to keep the drone they “stole.”
The president-elect took an antagonistic tone with China in his presidential campaign, accusing China of stealing jobs and manipulating American currency. The taking of the drone was seen by experts as a simple way for the Asian power to show that they did not approve of Trump’s ignorance of fifty years of diplomacy with Beijing in accepting the congratulatory phone call (for winning the presidential election) from Taiwan.
Still, the tensions have now apparently proceeded into the nuclear weapons phase, prompting talk of potential escalation and the possibility of World War 3.
Donald Trump’s increased nuclear rhetoric over the course of his campaign, not to mention the U.S. and Russia’s already stated commitments to modernizing their nuclear weapons program, prompted China’s state-run Global Times (via the Daily Express) to call for those who pushed for the independence of Taiwan to be “punished” and to guard against U.S. provocations in the South China Sea. The paper also called for increased spending on nuclear weapons and the development of intercontinental ballistic missiles.
Trump would then tweet concerning expanding the United States’ nuclear weapons program, according to CBS News, just days before Christmas, subsequently seconding his statement in a comment made on MSNBC that seemed to welcome a new nuclear arms race.
Of course, escalations in belligerent and/or threatening rhetoric does not necessarily mean a march toward war. Military exercises and posturing can be seen to be just that. But there are military experts and officials who see the continuing escalations, not to mention the ongoing economic and diplomatic tensions, as worrisome. The problem with so much antagonism, it is feared, is that it has brought relations between China and the U.S. closer to conflict and the brink of World War 3, an ever-increasing dangerous positioning that could easily slip into a world-threatening reality.

The Remnants of China’s Nuked City

RT
Named after a company owned by the China National Nuclear Corporation, the city became a hub for some of the nation’s greatest nuclear experts during the Cold War era. Now, footage has emerged showing the sparse remains of the mysterious “atomic bomb base.”
Built in 1958, the Gansu province city has all the trappings one might expect of a Mao Zedong-era Chinese settlement: regimented streets, concrete block buildings and a stone effigy to the former chairman of the Communist Party of China.
But it’s the nuclear fission symbol located on the building behind the large Mao statue that points to the city’s incredible history, which was seemingly never given a proper name, only a code.
It’s predecessor – the Ministry of Nuclear Industry – developed China’s first atomic bomb, which was tested at the Lop Nur site in the Gobi Desert in 1964. The ministry was later subsumed by the CNNC at the China National People’s Congress in 1988.
Pictures posted by website Sixth Tone show the gates of an abandoned 404 zoo, a children’s playground, as well as six power plant cooling towers.
A blog post by a man claiming to have been born in the settlement emerged in late 2014. Li Yang described how 404 had many features of a normal town – such as a theater, school, and local government – but was also a key cog in China’s plan to contend with Cold War superpowers the US and the Soviet Union.
“It also used to have the first military nuclear reactor of China,” Li said. “Today, it is basically deserted. It is said that there is an underground nuclear base. But I have never seen it.”
“The first generation of 404’s residents was also its builders. They are the best of every walk of life, chosen by the government from across the country to work together for China’s first atomic bomb, an important weapon for a country desperate to ensure its security from the United States and the former Soviet Union,” Li wrote.
It’s reported that only a smattering of 404 residents remain, with many people relocating to the western Gansu city of Jiayuguan.
Li’s account appears to back this up, with the ‘third generation of 404’ man stating that only elderly people remain in the city: “Only some old people live in that town, and they have decided to die there. I am afraid my hometown will disappear forever together with its last senior residents.”

Trump Challenges The China Horn

Donald Trump’s latest cabinet appointment has caused concern that the US president-elect is gearing up for an economic “war” with Beijing.
Peter Navarro, the author of Death by China and The Coming China Wars, which call for a tougher stance on China, will lead a White House council on US trade policy.
Trump made no mention of his new recruit’s hardline attitude, but said his work “laid out a path forward to restore our middle class” from “the harms inflicted by globalism”.
Navarro, a Harvard-educated academic, “is infamous in China watching circles for being a radical hawk” whose books paint the regime as a “despicable, parasitic, brutal, brass-knuckled, crass, callous, amoral, ruthless and totally totalitarian imperialist power”, says The Guardian.
His portrayal of the country may be “reminiscent of the Yellow Peril stuff of a century ago”, says Tim Worstall of Forbes, but more worryingly, “he believes things about trade that are simply not true”.
 The Financial Times quotes Dan Ikenson, the head of trade policy at Washington’s Cato Institute, as saying Navarro’s work presented a ‘”dangerous, misguided, zero-sum” view on the global economy.
 Trump’s attitude towards Beijing has raised eyebrows in Washington, where diplomats fear his blunt rhetoric and disregard for established protocol could further strain the two nations’ already chilly relationship.
The president-elect has come under fire for taking a call from President Tsai Ing-wen of Taiwan, undermining the US’s longstanding agreement with China not to recognise the state.
Following the incident, China’s state mouthpiece the Global Times said the businessman was “as ignorant as a child in terms of foreign policy”, the South China Morning Post reports.
Trump’s response has been to back his decision to accept Tsai’s phone call in a Fox News interview during which he lashed out at China for everything from “taxing us heavy at the borders” to building a “fortress” in the South China Sea.
For good measure, he said Beijing “isn’t helping us at all” with North Korea.
He also sent a defiant tweet following reports earlier this month that China had agreed to return a US underwater drone seized by a Chinese ship. “We should tell China that we don’t want the drone they stole back,” he wrote.
Trump’s apparent inability to resist goading Beijing threatens to “turn the world’s significant bilateral relationships into frighteningly spectacular reality TV”, says Jiayang Fan in the New Yorker. “China’s leaders are viscerally allergic to perceived bullying of any kind, especially at the hands of a Western superpower.”
Vilifying China as “a thief of American jobs and a strongman archrival that must be vanquished” might go down well with his populist support base, she warns, but as foreign policy it is “dangerously misguided”, she added.

The China Nuclear Horn Grows (Daniel 7)

Atul Aneja
BEIJING: DECEMBER 18, 2016 18:04 IST
UPDATED: DECEMBER 18, 2016 18:08 IST
China appears to be engaged in rapidly developing a long-range bomber, to fortify its nuclear deterrent — a move that is acquiring sharper focus after the United States President-elect Donald Trump questioned Washington’s unqualified support for Chinese sovereignty over Taiwan.
The state-run Xinhua news agency is relaying comments attributed to China’s Air Force Commander Ma Xiaotian that Beijing is developing the next-generation long-range bombers. The report said that the remarks by Gen. Ma confirmed the development of the “legendary H-20” bomber.
So far, it hasn’t done it
The report quoted Rear Admiral Yin Zhuo, director of the PLA Navy’s Expert Consultation Committee, as saying that China has so far not developed a large-tonnage, and long-range strategic bomber. The existing H-6 bomber that is in service is medium-sized, and not a strategic bomber. He added that China’s new range of strategic bombers will be at par with B-2 bombers of the United States, and have difficult-to-spot stealth features.
Admiral Yin noted that China has three specific advantages in developing the H-20 bomber. First, the developers can derive stealth technology from the J-20 and J-31 fighters — two China built stealth fighters. Second, China has already manufactured large transport aircraft such as the Y-20 and C-919, which can yield know-how to build big-sized strategic bombers. Besides, the new generation bombers can be armed with cruise missiles, nuclear and other weapons, which are already available in the Chinese arsenal. As a result of these advantages in materials, design and weaponry, the time lines for developing the H-20 can be shortened, though a typical cycle for making strategic bombers is around 10 years.
Trump may change status quo?
Following Mr. Trump’s election and his perceived inclination to change the status quo with Beijing, an op-ed in Global Times, affiliated with the Communist Party of China (CPC), had advocated the rapid development of the land based DF-41 Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (ICBM). The DF-41 missile, which is undergoing trials, can carry up to 10 nuclear warheads. With a range of around 12,000 kilometers, it can target the entire U.S. mainland, if launched from eastern China.
The Washington Free Beacon — an online newspaper — is quoting experts as saying that China is reconfiguring its entire range of land based atomic missiles, by enabling them to carry multiple warheads. That includes changes in the single warhead DF-5 as well as the DF-31 missiles.
Besides, China is modernising its more survivable sea based deterrent-necessary for a retaliatory nuclear second strike — by adding multiple warheads to its JI-2 Submarine Launched Ballistic Missiles (SLBM). The new missile will be either called JL-2C or JL-3.
Drone seizure deepens rift
The seizure of a U.S. underwater drone by China on Thursday near Subic Bay in the South China Sea has added to the growing friction between Beijing and the Trump administration-in-waiting.
Pentagon spokesman Peter Cook said the incident took place when the U.S. oceanographic survey ship Bowditch was about to retrieve the drone, which was used to collect data on salinity and water temperature.
But Chinese Defence Ministry spokesperson Yang Yujun defended China’s action. “We had to examine and verify the device in a bid to avoid any harm it might cause to the safety of navigation and personnel,” he said in a statement issued late on Saturday night. He added that the drone would be returned “in an appropriate manner.”
Trump’s tweet and tit-for-tat
Mr. Trump has waded into the drone controversy with a tweet, which said that, “We should tell China that we dont want the drone they stole back — let them keep it!”
His tweet triggered a cyberstorm in the Chinese social media. “Next time we will capture the US aircraft carrier without asking, since boss Trump is so generous,” said a posting on Sina Weibo, Chinese equivalent of Twitter. “What are you so arrogant for? We will return it once it is disassembled,” commented another on the micro-blogging site.

China Prepares For Confrontation With The US

AP
Dec 14, 2016 11:56 PM EST
BEIJING — China appears to have installed anti-aircraft and anti-missile weapons on its man-made islands in the strategically vital South China Sea, a U.S. security think tank says, upping the stakes in what many see as a potential Asian powder keg.
The Center for Strategic and International Studies said in a report late Wednesday that the anti-aircraft guns and close-in weapons systems designed to guard against missile attack have been placed on all seven of China’s newly created islands.
The outposts were built in recent years over objections by the U.S. and rival claimants by piling sand on top of coral reefs, followed by the construction of military grade 10,000-foot airstrips, barracks, lighthouses, radar stations and other infrastructure.
U.S. may loose launch pad for South China Sea patrols aimed at China
CSIS based its conclusions on satellite images taken in mid-to-late November and published on the website of its Asia Maritime Transparency Initiative.
In a statement, China’s Defense Ministry repeated that development on the islands was mainly for civilian purposes, but added that defensive measures were “appropriate and legal.”
“For example, were someone to be threatening you with armed force outside your front door, would you not get ready even a slingshot?” the ministry statement said.
Foreign Ministry spokesman Geng Shuang told reporters at a daily briefing that he had no information about the reported weaponry, but said such deployments were China’s sovereign right.
The Philippines, which has troops and villagers stationed on some reefs and islands near China’s new artificial islands, expressed concern despite recently improving relations with China.
“If true, it is a big concern for us and the international community who uses the South China Sea lanes for trade,” Defense Secretary Delfin Lorenzana said. “It would mean that the Chinese are militarizing the area, which is not good.”
China’s new island armaments “show that Beijing is serious about defense of its artificial islands in case of an armed contingency in the South China Sea,” CSIS experts wrote in the report.
“Among other things, they would be the last line of defense against cruise missiles launched by the United States or others against these soon-to-be-operational air bases,” the report said.
Beijing says the islands are intended to boost maritime safety in the region while downplaying their military utility. They also mark China’s claim to ownership of practically the entire South China Sea.
Taiwan, Vietnam, the Philippines, Malaysia and Brunei also claim territory in the waterway through which an estimated $5 trillion in global trade passes each year, while the U.S. Navy insists on its right to operate throughout the area, including in waters close to China’s new outposts. China has strongly criticized such missions, known as freedom of navigation operations.
The U.S. has committed to beefing up its military presence in the area, although new uncertainty has been introduced by incoming president Donald Trump, who broke long-established diplomatic protocol by talking on the phone earlier this month with the president of China’s longtime rival Taiwan.
Trump has called for a reconsideration of its commitments to its Asian allies, including Japan and South Korea, while simultaneously criticizing Chinese trade policy toward the U.S. along with its new territorial assertiveness. He also referred to China’s man-made islands in a tweet earlier this month, saying Beijing didn’t ask the U.S. if it was OK to “build a massive military complex in the South China Sea.”
The timing is significant in that these first clear images come amid Trump’s challenging comments about China and its South China Sea fortresses,” said Alexander Neill, a senior fellow for Asia-Pacific security for the International Institute for Strategic Studies based in Singapore.
Chinese President Xi Jinping said on a visit to the U.S. last year that “China does not intend to pursue militarization” of the area, prompting some foreign experts to accuse China of going back on its word with its new deployments.
Despite that, China considers it vital to equip the islands with defensive means given their distance – 1,000 miles – from the Chinese mainland, together with the nearby presence of forces from rival claimants such as Vietnam, said Yue Gang, a retired colonel and military analyst.
“As the matter of fact, these occupied islands have been armed and fortified for a long time,” Yue said. “No country in the world would only commit to providing civil services without considering its own security safety.”
Looking forward, the nature of China’s new military deployments will likely be calibrated in response to moves taken by the U.S., said the IISS’s Neill.
“China will argue that they are entitled to place whatever they want there in reaction to U.S. actions,” Neill said. “The big question is whether Trump will embark on a more strident or discordant policy in the South China Sea.”