Australian Horn To Nuke Up India

Australia-India+Uranium+Deal+Under+Scrutiny+For+'Lack+of+Safeguards'Australian uranium to arrive soon

Turnbull says working closely with India to meet its fuel requirements for civil nuclear programme

Australia will start supplying uranium to India “as soon as possible”, the visiting Prime Minister, Malcolm Turnbull, said here on Monday.
Australia’s promise on uranium was announced even as both countries signed six agreements, including one on countering terrorism.
“Our know-how and resources are already partnering with India’s 24×7 Power For All, Smart Cities and Make in India programmes, but there is room for further growth. We’ve worked closely with India to meet our respective requirements for the provision of fuel for India’s civil nuclear programme, and we look forward to the first export of Australian uranium to India as soon as possible,” Mr. Turnbull said in a press statement at Hyderabad House following bilateral talks with Prime Minister Narendra Modi.
Mr. Modi welcomed the passage of the Civil Nuclear Transfers to India Act in the Australian Parliament, opening up opportunities for Australia to support Indian energy generation. Australia has about 40 per cent of the world’s uranium reserves and exports nearly 7,000 tonnes of yellow cake annually. Both sides agreed to extend bilateral engagement to the Asia- Pacific region. In this context, a joint statement issued at the end of the meeting agreed to hold a bilateral maritime exercise named AUSINDEX in the Bay of Bengal in 2018 and also pledged to hold a joint exercise of the Special Forces later this year. Both sides welcomed the decision for the first bilateral Army-to-Army exercise later this year.
The bilateral discussion also hinted at a growing agreement to oppose China’s territorial claims over the South China Sea region.
Chinese presence
As part of the emerging Asia-Pacific focus of India-Australia ties, the joint statement took a firm position against China’s growing presence in the South China Sea region and said, “Both leaders recognised that India and Australia share common interests in ensuring maritime security and the safety of sea lines of communication. Both leaders recognised the importance of freedom of navigation and overflight, unimpeded lawful commerce, as well as resolving maritime disputes by peaceful means.

The Australian Nuclear Horn (Daniel 8)

 

NEW DELHI: Australia, the world’s biggest uranium producer, is likely to start supplying the metal to India’s nuclear power plants this year after visiting Premier Malcolm Turnbull helps put in place the mechanism governing the trade.
The two countries had signed a civil nuclear deal in 2014 when former Prime Minister Tony Abbott visited India. Thereafter, Australia put in place a safeguards agreement and last December passed the legislation to start supplying uranium to India, a trade viewed as the cornerstone of a bilateral strategic partnership.
The hint of uranium sales to India came from none other than Turnbull, who would be in the country between April 9 and 12.
“My first visit to India as Prime Minister is a chance to further cooperate across a wide range of sectors, including energy, education and trade. But there are many more opportunities. India wants to provide energy security through a range of technologies, including nuclear, clean coal, natural gas and renewable energy. Australia is well placed to provide many of the raw materials, and some of the latest technology,” Turnbull said in a Sydney Institute speech on Thursday ahead of his trip to India.
Besides nuclear energy, defence ties will be high on the agenda of the talks Turnbull will hold with his Indian counterpart Narendra Modi next Monday: Australia is willing to rejoin the Indo-USJapan trilateral Malabar Naval exercise, eyeing to play role of a stabiliser in the Indian Ocean Region, according to people familiar with the developments.
The second Indo-Australian bilateral Navy exercises will occur either later this year or the next year, according to one of the people quoted above. “Security ties will be the key pillar of Indo-Australian strategic partnership, and this visit of Turnbull will be a key step in that direction. Defence and counter-terror partnership are key elements of security ties,” an official explained.
“India is one of Australia’s most important international priorities. Our relationship has expanded dramatically since we established a Strategic Partnership in 2009, followed by two-way Prime Ministerial visits in 2014,” according to Australian High Commissioner to India Harinder Sidhu.

Why Australia is a Nuclear Horn (Daniel 7:7) Australian Uranium Mining Sites Australian Uranium Mining Sites

 

Global uranium production is expected to increase at a compound annual growth rate of 4.3 per cent, to reach 76,493 tonnes in 2020, research and consulting firm GlobalData revealed.
The company’s latest report states that growth in production is needed to meet upcoming demand from new reactors. It outlined that output at Four Mile increased from 750t in 2014 to 990t in 2015.
There are 22 new reactors scheduled for completion in 2017, with a total capacity of 22,444 megawatts (MW), according to GlobalData.
This includes eight reactors in China with a combined capacity of 8510 MW, two reactors in South Korea with a combined capacity of 2680 MW, two reactors in Russia with a combined capacity of 2199 MW, and four reactors in Japan with a combined capacity of 3598 MW.
Global uranium consumption is forecast to increase by five per cent, to reach 88,500t of triuranium octoxide (U₃O₈) in 2017.
The major expansions to nuclear capacity are projected to occur in China, India, Russia and South Korea over the next two years to 2018. The United States is forecast to remain the largest producer of nuclear power in the short term, with the recent completion of the 1200 MW Watts Bar Unit 2 reactor in Tennessee.
Cliff Smee, GlobalData’s head of research and analysis for mining, said: “Commercial operations at the Cigar Lake project in Canada commenced in 2014, with an annual uranium metal capacity of 6900t.
“The project produced 4340t of uranium in 2015, compared with 130t in 2014. Meanwhile, production at the Four Mile project in Australia rose from 750t in 2014 to 990t in 2015.
“By contrast, production from the US declined by 32 per cent in 2015, while in Namibia it decreased by 20 per cent. This was due to respective declines of 33 per cent each at the Smith Ranch-Highland and Crow Butte mines in the US, and falls of 20 per cent and 13.6 per cent at the Rossing and Langer Heinrich mines in Namibia.”

The Australian Nuclear Horn (Daniel 7)

Western_Australia_barnett_uranium_mines-e1447621146920West Australian uranium mines win approval as prices rise
As output slows elsewhere, Australia’s export market has big potential
GEOFF HISCOCK, Contributring writer
SYDNEY — Canadian uranium mining giant Cameco Corporation has won approval for a big new mine known as Yeelirrie in Western Australia, bringing to four the number of projects in the Australian state that are ready to swing into production if world uranium prices continue to improve from a 12-year low reached in November 2016.
Australia is the world’s third largest uranium producer, behind Kazakhstan and Canada. It has no nuclear power industry of its own and exports its entire uranium output, primarily to nuclear power station operators in Japan, China, South Korea, Taiwan, Europe and the U.S.
The Liberal National government in Western Australia, which faces a state election on March 11, approved the Yeelirrie uranium project, 650km northeast of the state capital Perth on Jan. 16. It follows similar state approvals in the past month for two other uranium projects — Vimy Resources‘ Mulga Rocks and Toro Energy’s Wiluna.
Cameco, the world’s biggest listed uranium producer, earlier won federal and state approval in 2015 for another uranium project known as Kintyre, about 750km north of Yeelirrie in the East Pilbara region. Cameco’s partner in Kintyre is Japan’s Mitsubishi Development.
Cameco bought 100% of the Yeelirrie project in the state’s Goldfields region from BHP Billiton in 2012, paying $430 million for a mine that will have an operational life of 18 years. But since then, it has held back the project amid unfavorable market conditions in the uranium industry.
Conditional go-ahead
Western Australia’s state Environment Minister Albert Jacob gave Yeelirrie a conditional go-ahead despite a recommendation against approval from the state’s Environmental Protection Authority, which warned of a potential threat to tiny prawn-like subterranean creatures known as stygofauna and troglofauna that live in the area.
Cameco Australia’s Managing Director Brian Reilly said state government approval was a „significant step forward“ and that the company was taking prudent steps to prepare the Yeelirrie project for „improved market conditions.“
Yeelirrie’s measured and indicated resource base is 127.3 million pounds of U3 O8 (a mixture of uranium oxides known as yellowcake), making it one of the largest potential mines in Australia.
As yet, no uranium mines operate in Western Australia, and the opposition Labor Party opposes uranium mining. But the party has said that if it wins office in the March state election, it would not overturn approved projects because of the damage it could do to investment risk perceptions.

Why Australia is a Nuclear Horn (Daniel 7:7)

Why Australia is a Nuclear Horn (Daniel 7:7) 

Global uranium production is expected to increase at a compound annual growth rate of 4.3 per cent, to reach 76,493 tonnes in 2020, research and consulting firm GlobalData revealed.
The company’s latest report states that growth in production is needed to meet upcoming demand from new reactors. It outlined that output at Four Mile increased from 750t in 2014 to 990t in 2015.
There are 22 new reactors scheduled for completion in 2017, with a total capacity of 22,444 megawatts (MW), according to GlobalData.
This includes eight reactors in China with a combined capacity of 8510 MW, two reactors in South Korea with a combined capacity of 2680 MW, two reactors in Russia with a combined capacity of 2199 MW, and four reactors in Japan with a combined capacity of 3598 MW.
Global uranium consumption is forecast to increase by five per cent, to reach 88,500t of triuranium octoxide (U₃O₈) in 2017.
The major expansions to nuclear capacity are projected to occur in China, India, Russia and South Korea over the next two years to 2018. The United States is forecast to remain the largest producer of nuclear power in the short term, with the recent completion of the 1200 MW Watts Bar Unit 2 reactor in Tennessee.
Cliff Smee, GlobalData’s head of research and analysis for mining, said: “Commercial operations at the Cigar Lake project in Canada commenced in 2014, with an annual uranium metal capacity of 6900t.
“The project produced 4340t of uranium in 2015, compared with 130t in 2014. Meanwhile, production at the Four Mile project in Australia rose from 750t in 2014 to 990t in 2015.
“By contrast, production from the US declined by 32 per cent in 2015, while in Namibia it decreased by 20 per cent. This was due to respective declines of 33 per cent each at the Smith Ranch-Highland and Crow Butte mines in the US, and falls of 20 per cent and 13.6 per cent at the Rossing and Langer Heinrich mines in Namibia.”

The Hypocrisy of the Australian Nuclear Horn

Australia-India+Uranium+Deal+Under+Scrutiny+For+'Lack+of+Safeguards' 
People’s tribunal finds Australia guilty over nuclear weapons
Hamish McDonald

Malcolm Turnbull is getting accused of many things as he heads towards the first anniversary of his snafu-prone prime ministership. But aiding and abetting the planning of genocide, ecocide and even omnicide (that is, the destruction of everyone and all living things)?

Well, yes. The University of Sydney was recently the venue for an international people’s tribunal, a kind of volunteer court, in which the leaders of the nine nuclear powers were on trial for planning the above crimes through their explicit threats to use their weapons. Turnbull, as our current leader, was up for facilitating the use of American weapons. The judges were New Zealand’s former disarmament minister Matthew Robson and Sydney politics academic Keith Suter, who duly found the accused guilty, in absentia of course.

They ruled that nuclear weapons violate the accepted principles of international humanitarian law in wartime because they cannot discriminate between military and civilian targets; go far beyond proportional response and military objectives; don’t protect non-combatants; cause unnecessary suffering by spreading poison, disease and genetic damage; cause massive environmental damage; threaten future generations; threaten death on a scale amounting to genocide; and involve massive collateral damage to neutral countries.

The United States, France, Russia, Pakistan and Britain refuse to rule out first use of their nuclear weapons, “but all indicted leaders have military plans and exercises that demonstrate that they are ready to use nuclear weapons if they deem it necessary”, the tribunal found.

Turnbull had retired politics professor Bob Howard, brother of predecessor John Howard, speaking up as volunteer defence counsel. But it was guilty as charged, since Australia’s position was that it would accept the use of nuclear weapons by the US in its defence.

The gesture comes as nuclear powers are expanding or modernising their arsenals. India and Pakistan are in a nuclear arms race: even use of 100 Hiroshima sized-bombs in that theatre would plunge the Earth into its coldest climate for a thousand years, University of Missouri expert Steven Starr told the tribunal. An exchange between the big powers would, aside from the immediate casualties, create a new Ice Age and result in most surviving humans and large animals dying of starvation.

Britain’s new prime minister, Theresa May, has just had legislation passed for a $69 billion replacement fleet of ballistic missile submarines. The Americans are developing a new guided bomb called the B61-12, which has got the Federation of American Scientists worried because it could be the most “usable” or “thinkable” nuclear weapon ever developed. Its relatively small yield can be adjusted up or down to a maximum 50 kilotons. Combined with high accuracy from its motors and steerable fins, this could tempt commanders into a “precision” nuclear strike, taking a gamble nuclear escalation won’t result.

Nuclear ‘weasels’

Australia has steadily retreated from the push for universal nuclear disarmament that Bill Hayden, notably, inserted into policy when he was foreign minister in the Hawke government to provide moral balance to the alliance with the US.

As we’ve noticed before, the new Defence White Paper this year dropped all that. “Australia’s security is underpinned by the ANZUS Treaty, United States extended deterrence and access to advanced United States technology and information,” it stated. “Only the nuclear and conventional military capabilities of the United States can offer effective deterrence against the possibility of nuclear threats against Australia.”

Some might argue that joint facilities such as the space warfare facilities at Pine Gap and Geraldton would be first targets of a nuclear opponent seeking to disable the US command network. China says it would not use its weapons against a non-nuclear power. But would a country that hosts nuclear war-fighting facilities count as one?

Julie Bishop is all for nuclear weapons, gushing that “the horrendous humanitarian consequences of nuclear weapons are precisely why deterrence has worked”. In Geneva, her diplomats have been hard at work trying to derail efforts for a United Nations ban on nuclear weapons.

Richard Lennane, a former Australian diplomat who now runs a Geneva NGO called Wildfire which supports such a ban, chronicled the manoeuvres this week on the Lowy Institute’s website The Interpreter. Australian delegates in a UN working group have been trying to moderate the push for a ban, by seeking a “progressive” elimination of nuclear weapons rather than an outright ban, in company with some 28 nations that rely on extended deterrence from nuclear protectors. They are known variously as the nuclear “umbrella” or “weasel” group.

As the working group headed for its conclusive vote on August 19, it seemed that a suitably weasel-worded consensus resolution had been agreed upon to send to the UN General Assembly: a recommendation for a start on negotiations for a nuclear weapons ban treaty, with a note of the umbrella states’ dissenting view.

Then Australia baulked at the consensus and declared on behalf of 14 umbrella states that the text was not acceptable, and forced a vote. Lennane said it was felt Australia had acted in bad faith “by using the prospect of a consensus report to extract concessions and negotiate a weaker text, and then when others thought all was agreed, pulling the rug from under them and calling for a vote”. Canada, Germany, Japan, the Netherlands and Norway were among the umbrella states that refused to join Australia and voted for the resolution. It was passed, but with much bad will towards Australia. Bishop can be sure of brownie points in Washington, no doubt.

Maybe the Sydney tribunal will be more than a futile gesture against this kind of thing.

Erdoğan eyes Kurds

The Syrian conflict got even more multi-sided this week. Turkey sent tanks and special forces across the border to help its local allies take the town of Jarabulus from Daesh, with US air support.
The Americans sent up fighter jets to warn off Syrian government aircraft that were attacking Kurdish positions elsewhere in the country’s north where US special forces are embedded, though the Pentagon insists this doesn’t amount to a no-fly zone. A two-day ceasefire was suggested for Aleppo.
A suicide bomber killed 51 people, about half of them children, at a Kurdish wedding inside Turkey at the weekend. Recep Tayyip Erdoğan’s government blamed Daesh and expressed sympathy, but his Kurdish population was not convinced about his sincerity. Until recently, Daesh could get its recruits and supplies across the border from Turkey, and sell its oil production back.

Erdoğan has lately been warming up to Russia and Iran, suggesting he’s switching priorities from seeking the downfall of Syria’s Bashar al-Assad to squelching Kurdish hopes of a new state straddling the present borders of Turkey, Iran, Syria and Iraq. The move on Jarabulus was to prevent Kurdish groups capturing it first. The Turks have warned the Kurds to back off to the eastern side of the Euphrates River, or they will be attacked. The US balancing act between its Turkish and Kurdish friends gets ever harder.

Russia ‘shows off’

Vladimir Putin does not seem at all deterred, meanwhile, gathering troops, armour, aircraft and advanced missile systems on the frontier with Ukraine. He is poised for attack, but it could all be posturing ahead of Russian parliamentary elections next month.

But posturing hasn’t gone down too well in Tehran. Russia’s recent use of an Iranian air base for bombing runs into Syria got Iranian MPs asking about the terms of use. Defence minister Hossein Dehghan assured them the arrangement had been temporary and was “finished, for now”. And he added, in a radio interview, that “Russians are interested to show they are a superpower to guarantee their share in the political future of Syria and, of course, there has been a kind of showoff and ungentlemanly [attitude] in this field.”

world@thesaturdaypaper.com.au

The Hypocrisy of the Australian Nuclear Horn (Daniel 7)


Australia Stands in the Way of Nuclear Weapons Ban

Published 21 August 2016 (11 hours 7 minutes ago)

Australia has remained steadfast in its opposition to an international ban on nuclear weapons at a UN meeting on nuclear disarmament by forcing and unexpected vote on a report seeking to start disarmament negotiations.

The report recommended that negotiations for banning nuclear weapons start in 2017. The report was thought to be passed unanimously at the conference on disarmament on Friday in Geneva. But Australian representatives who demanded a vote which eventually went against their favor; approved by 69 nations, opposed by 22, with 13 abstaining.

The recommendations in the report support “a legally binding instrument to prohibit nuclear weapons, leading towards their total elimination”. Formal negotiations will take place at an international conference, after the proposal is tabled at the UN General Assembly.

Australian officials told Friday’s conference that it was a blanket ban on nuclear arms would not practically facilitate disarmament efforts. Australia’s attempt to disrupt disarmament efforts was “shameful and outrageous,” Tim Wright from the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons, was quoted by the Guardian.

“Australia is resisting the tide of history. A majority of nations believe that nuclear weapons are unacceptable and must be prohibited” Wright said.

The Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, has previously stated that they oppose nuclear disarmament because of threats from North Korea and Iran, citing their reliance on deterrence from US nuclear arms.

The Australian Nuclear Horn (Daniel 7)

Western_Australia_barnett_uranium_mines-e1447621146920 
Australian Uranium Mining Around the World

Australia is the world’s third largest uranium producer, but Australian mining companies operate around the world as well. Here’s a look at some of those companies.

Australia, the world’s third largest producer of uranium, hosts the largest endowment of uranium resources in the world, making up approximately 31 percent of global totals.

The country has been mining uranium since 1954, with several currently operating and more on the way. However, Australia produces uranium in other countries as well.

Although the country currently doesn’t use nuclear power, Australia produced 6689 tonnes of uranium in 2015, putting it behind only Kazakhstan and Canada, according to the World Nuclear Association (WNA). Despite the uranium spot price having a difficult year, it is still in high demand.
Before we dig deep into the uranium Australia mines around the world, let’s take a quick look into some of its current operating mines within the country.

Australia’s uranium mines

Ranger Mine: this location is operated by Energy Resources of Australia (ASX:ERA), and opened in 1981. Last June, ERA announced that it will defer proceeding further development of the underground mine to access 27,650 tonnes of uranium after it spent $177 million on the project.
Olympic Dam: one of the biggest mining companies in the world, BHB Billiton (NYSE:BHP), operates the mine. Olympic Dam is Australia’s biggest underground mine, producing copper, gold, silver and, of course, uranium.
Beverley Mine: Heathgate Resources, formed in 1990, operates the Beverley mine, which officially opened in February 2001. . In December 2010 the company received government approval to mine the Beverley North deposits. Mining of Beverley ceased at the end of 2013, and of Beverley North early in 2014.
Four Mile: its leases are contiguous with the Beverley mine, and is operated by Alliance Resources (ASX:AGS), with its mining commencing in April of 2014. Total production of uranium from April 2014 to June 2015 was 2,441,092 pounds.
Junior Australian uranium companies
A-Cap Resources (ASX:ACB)
Big news is happening with A-Cap Resources: it’s set to build the first ever uranium mine in Botswana, with a capital expenditure of $351 million after passing an environmental assessment. A-Cap submitted the application for a mining license last August with plans to open a pit mine with a lifespan of more than 18 years.
Botswana is estimated to hold approximately 1.04 billion tonnes of uranium reserves. Over the last decade, no production has taken place because its government issued several prospecting licenses.
Toro Energy (ASX:TOE)
Toro currently holds exploration projects in Africa and investments in Strateco Resources in Quebec. In Namibia, Toro holds a joint venture partner with Deep Yellow (ASX:DYL), another Australian uranium exploration company and together have three exploration licenses located throughout Namibia.
Furthermore, the company has proclaimed they are working towards becoming Australia’s next uranium producer with the development of a mine in Wiluna.
Peninsula Energy (ASX:PEN)
Peninsula Energy commenced operations in December 2015 at its Lance Projects in Wyoming and is currently progressing its Karoo Uranium Projects in South Africa through feasibility.
In the company’s quarterly activity report released in April, minimum sodium bicarbonate levels were achieved in March at the Lance Uranium project, increasing the rate of uranium extraction.

The Australian Nuclear Horn (Daniel 7)

Western_Australia_barnett_uranium_mines-e1447621146920
Australia will soon sell uranium to Ukraine for power generation.

Foreign Minister Julie Bishop will arrive in the United States on Wednesday for a global nuclear security summit and will also attend a dinner meeting at the White House hosted by President Barack Obama.

She will have talks with British, Dutch and Singaporean leaders and foreign minister counterparts.
At the summit, leaders will discuss ongoing international co-operation on nuclear security and the threat of terrorists acquiring nuclear material or sabotaging nuclear facilities.

Ms Bishop will sign an agreement with Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko to supply uranium for power.

Australia already supplies uranium to Canada, China, France, India, Japan, South Korea, Russia, the UK and the US.

Australian Nuclear Horn to Supply Uranium to India (Daniel 7:7)

  
Australian Government Gives Green Signal to Supply of Uranium to India
Indo-Asian News Service | Updated: Nov 30, 2015 07:20 IST

Sydney: After eight years of intense negotiations, bureaucratic hurdles and a shifting nuclear policy, the Australian government has finally given the green signal to the export of uranium to India “which can begin immediately”.

The Australia-India Nuclear Cooperation Agreement permits Australian companies to commence commercial uranium exports to India, an important milestone in Australia’s relationship with India, Australian Foreign Minister Julie Bishop said in a media release.

While previous Liberal prime minister Tony Abbott was quite gung-ho about the supply of uranium to India, current incumbent Malcolm Turnbull would get the credit for sealing the deal to export uranium to the power-hungry south Asian country.

“The supply of Australian uranium will help India meet its rapidly growing electricity demand and improve the welfare of its people,” said Bishop in the media release. “The administrative arrangements have been signed and uranium exports can begin immediately.”

Many observers of the bilateral ties would agree with foreign minister’s assertion that the export of uranium to India is a milestone in the bilateral relations.

It was Liberal prime minister John Howard who first agreed to sell uranium to India in 2007 in spite of the refusal by New Delhi to sign the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) which has been a pre-requisite to receive Australian uranium. It is believed that Australian PM was persuaded by the US to sell uranium to India soon after finalisation of the US-India Civil Nuclear Agreement in July that year.

His successor, Kevin Rudd of Labour reinstated the ban on export of uranium to India as it had not signed the NPT, but next Prime Minister Julia Gillard, who deposed Rudd in a bloodless party coup, made a historic shift in her party’s policy by agreeing to export uranium to a non-NPT signatory in 2012.

Much more pragmatic than her predecessor, she admitted that a refusal to sell uranium to India had been an “obstacle” to getting a larger slice of the benefits of the booming Indian economy.

Australia is also keen in exporting coal to India to run her conventional power stations. But it was the nod to the uranium deal which was being awaited anxiously by New Delhi watchers in Australia.
Besides India, Australia has also finalised a Nuclear Cooperation Agreement with the United Arab Emirates.