The Canadian Nuclear Horn (Daniel 7:7)

Dolgert: Here’s why Canada should get nuclear weapons


Dozens of protesters staged a demonstration at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to mark the 72nd anniversary of the atomic attack on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Justin Sullivan, Getty Images JUSTIN SULLIVAN / GETTY IMAGES
Dear Prime Minister Trudeau,
Please consider inaugurating a nuclear armament program. Please begin this process now.
I never imagined writing something like this. American by birth, but now also a Canadian citizen, I’ve always regarded the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki as a stain on my birth nation’s honour. But the time has come to face reality, and the foreign minister’s June speech reasserting Canadian sovereignty is only the beginning of the reckoning.
We are in many ways living through a replay of the 1930s: a world struggling in the wake of economic cataclysm, fascists rising across Europe and an authoritarian in power (this time in the United States) cultivates support from the radical right.
Tyranny is on the march, and there is no clear end-point in sight. We can no longer assume that our country’s safety is assured, and even proposals for anti-missile defence don’t go far enough because they assume a democratic U.S. – the very thing that is now in question.
Alarmist? Maybe. But the consequences of a misstep now — the 21st-century equivalent of 1933, the year of Hitler’s ascendance — are dire, and we can’t regain later the time that we lose now. Nuclear programs take time to initiate, and in order to be prepared for our version of 1939 (the start of the Second World War), we cannot allow these to be “the locust years,” as Winston Churchill described the time wasted between 1933 and 1939.
So this is 1933. Start the countdown.
America is on a quest to demonize Muslims, round up Mexican immigrants, restrict trade, break up NATO and help Vladimir Putin divvy up the world. If you want to understand Donald Trump’s foreign policy, think “Mafia Protection Racket.” Just change the little shop-owners, forced to pay up, into little nations across the globe.
Canada is a small shopkeeper not so well-positioned to resist this new racket.
To understand what it’s like being beside a bully in today’s world, look at Ukraine. Perhaps the greatest mistake that country made after the breakup of the USSR was to get rid of its nuclear weapons. The consequences? Russia seizes Crimea and effectively invades eastern Ukraine by arming Russian secessionists there. This could also happen to Latvia and the Baltic states.
Could it happen here? For more than a century, Canadian policy could assume that, while the U.S. might be an 800-lbs gorilla on our doorstep, at least the gorilla played by the rules. But Trump has said the old rules won’t apply, and his selection of white nationalists and conspiracy theorists to powerful roles in his administration indicates he is not kidding.
Most troublingly, recent Congressional Republican capitulation on “L’Affaire Russe” shows us that the famed “checks and balances” of the U.S. Constitution mean little, and that the path to American authoritarianism is wide open.
To plan for the day when the U.S. is more like Putin’s aggressive bear, Canada must be able to protect itself without anyone’s assistance. A conventional military buildup is nonsensical, given the size disparity between the U.S., Russia, and ourselves.
But as Israel, Pakistan and North Korea have shown, nuclear arms are a pragmatic deterrent for small nations adjacent to populous neighbours of uncertain motives.
Yes, this might provoke the ire of Trump or Putin, and hasten the conflict it means to stave off. That risk must be carefully weighed. But what do you think Ukraine would do, given the chance to go back and keep its nukes?
Was Ukrainian disarmament rewarded with Russian pacifism? Who, other than Putin, is Trump’s model for strong leadership? And, speaking of Putin, who is looking to contest Canada’s future Arctic claims? If you think Trump will support us against Russia’s coming provocations, think again.
Rather than trigger a crisis, I expect this strategy would preserve the peace, by forcing potential aggressors to acknowledge a far more potent Canadian response.
To be clear, I am not suggesting that America is our enemy. Canada just needs to prepare to ensure its own security in an uncertain world, which requires having the resources to face any potential future conflict.
Starting a nuclear program is not easy. It takes time and research to determine the most practical options for Canada. It will also require withdrawing from the nuclear non-proliferation treaty, a step with major ramifications that requires careful consideration.
Importantly, however, we should not think that such a program would be inherently “un-Canadian.” For two decades, during the Cold War, we had up to 450 nuclear warheads permanently stationed on Canadian bases (though these were not under exclusive Canadian control). We need to trust in ourselves even more now, and stop relying on others to protect us.
Maybe I’m being alarmist. Maybe. But at what point does alarmism become prudence? Not when an aggressor makes the first overt threats – by then it’s too late. If 1933 (i.e. now) is too soon, then when? At some point we must be ready to start the discussion about protecting ourselves, and three years’ grace is about the best we can hope for.
After that we have to rely on the United Kingdom or United States to bail us out … Oh, wait.
Stefan Dolgert is an associate professor in the department of Political Science at Brock University in St. Catharines, and can be found on Twitter @PosthumanProf.

The Camadian Nuclear Horn (Daniel 7)

BY DAVID PUGLIESE, OTTAWA CITIZEN
ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED: OCT 28, 2016O
Thursday at the United Nations there was a vote on establishing negotiations for a treaty banning nuclear weapons. 123 nations voted in favour of the resolution.
But those nations with nuclear weapons, including the U.S., Russia, China, North Korea, France and others voted against it, Bloomberg news service noted in its article. Canada also voted against the resolution (38 nations, including many NATO nations, opposed the effort to ban nuclear weapons….16 others abstained).Co-sponsored by 57 nations, the resolution calls for a conference next year “to negotiate a legally binding instrument to prohibit nuclear weapons, leading towards their total elimination.”
Opposing its call for a nuclear-free world is awkward for world leaders, and none more so than U.S. President Barack Obama,” Bloomberg news service noted in its article. “He’s preparing to leave office seven years after he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in large part for what the award panel called his ‘vision of, and work for, a world without nuclear weapons.’ ”
Peggy Mason, Former Canadian Ambassador for Disarmament to the UN, now President of the Rideau Institute released the following statement after Canada’s UN vote today against Resolution L.41:
“The First Committee on Disarmament and International Security of the UN General Assembly today passed an historic resolution, mandating the launch in 2017 of negotiations for a legally binding instrument prohibiting nuclear weapons. Such a ban would reinforce customary international law against the threat or use of nuclear weapons and pave the way for further negotiations on their verifiable destruction and ultimate elimination.
Tensions between Russia and the USA are dangerously high. Massive nuclear weapons modernization programmes are underway. The negotiation to be launched by this resolution is the best hope the international community has to move away from the nuclear brink.
Canada’s vote against this resolution puts this country, quite simply, on the wrong side of history. Canada was one of only a handful of countries to vote NO. In so doing we joined with most other NATO member states, in blatant contradiction of our legal obligation under the Nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty (NPT) Article VI to enter into good faith negotiations for nuclear disarmament. This is the exact opposite of what Canada should be doing. We should be working as hard as we can to reduce NATO’s unconscionable and unnecessary reliance on nuclear weapons, not using that reliance as a reason for opposing nuclear disarmament negotiations at the UN. In that regard, we note that fellow NATO member, Netherlands, withstood American pressure and abstained rather than voting no.
Canada has another opportunity to put this right when the General Assembly votes on this resolution in early December. We call on Canada to change its vote ideally to a YES but, at a minimum, to an abstention and at the same time to signal its intent to contribute constructively to the negotiation, once launched. These actions would be worthy of a country seeking to be elected to the UN Security Council in 2021.”

The Canadian-Indian Nuclear Alliance

BY: PTI | NEW DELHI |
Published On:September 8, 2016 5:48 Pm
India and Canada have discussed a wide range of issues of mutual interest, including the civil-nuclear cooperation between the two countries. The discussion was held during a meeting between Union Minister Jitendra Singh and visiting Canada Minister for Natural Resources, James Gordon Carr, here on Wednesday.
The two leaders discussed a wide range of issues of mutual interest, including civil-nuclear cooperation between the two countries, an official release issued said today. As a country with large energy requirements, India looks forward to promoting nuclear energy production at a significant scale and the two nations can jointly work to achieve this, said Singh, Minister of State in Prime Minister’s Office.
He referred to a common technological base of Pressurised Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) in which India and Canada are global leaders and it is an area offering opportunity of potential bilateral cooperation between the two countries. While recalling the traditional friendly relations between the two countries, Singh said the most distinctive feature of Indo-Canadian relations was that these had been consistently compatible, without even a single intervening phase of bitterness or unpleasantness.
“This has helped the two countries to achieve positive collaboration in various sectors, including in the area of nuclear energy which is a success story,” he said. Singh referred to the visit of Prime Minister Narendra Modi to Canada in April 2015 during which a long term uranium procurement contract was signed by Department of Atomic Energy, Government of India with the Canadian Uranium producer CAMECO.
Thereafter, the first consignment of Canadian uranium reached India in December 2015 and the second consignment is expected by November this year, he said. Singh expressed satisfaction over the Canadian delegation planning a visit to Mumbai where it will get an opportunity to interact with the scientists at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) and Department of Atomic Energy, the release said.
Carr said that he looks forward to greater growth in Indo-Canadian cooperation during the years ahead. He also extended invitation to Singh to visit Canada at a time of his convenience.

The Canadian Nuclear Horn (Daniel 7)

Canada-India 
Canada hopes to supply more uranium

The Hindu
Updated: September 7, 2016 23:00 IST | Special Correspondent

Canada was hopeful of reaching agreement to supply energy-hungry and fast-growing India with more uranium than the 3,000 metric tonnes that has already been agreed upon, Canadian Natural Resources Minister Jim Carr said on Wednesday.

“So long as [bilateral] negotiations continue and Canada can supply enough to meet India’s needs, there is every good reason to be optimistic” about Canada supplying more than 3,000 metric tonnes of uranium to fuel India’s nuclear power plants, Mr. Carr told reporters here on Wednesday.

In April last year, during Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s visit to Canada, a pact was inked for Canada’s Cameco to supply India 3,000 metric tonnes of uranium over five years at an estimated cost of $254 million. Asked about the possibility of more uranium supplies, Mr.Carr said it depended on the continuing conversations and bilateral negotiations between Canadian business leaders and Indian officials. The Canadian government is an active participant in these talks, he said.

Business delegation

Mr.Carr is leading a high-level business delegation, which is visiting India from September 7-9. The delegation — which will visit New Delhi and Mumbai — includes representatives of leading Canadian technology and natural resource firms, according to the Canadian High Commission.
In New Delhi, Mr.Carr will participate in the Canada-India Energy Dialogue with Minister of State (Independent Charge), Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas, Dharmendra Pradhan.

Mr.Carr — who will be meeting high-level government officials and representatives of Indian business in New Delhi and Mumbai — will lay emphasis on Canada’s renewed commitment to innovation and clean technology, notably through Mission Innovation, the High Commission said.
Canada and India are among the 21 Mission Innovation partners who have committed to doubling government investments in clean technology research and development and stimulating private sector investment in clean technology over the next five years, it added.

Clean energy

Earlier, at an event organised by the Indian industry body FICCI and the Canadian High Commission, Mr. Carr referred to the recent UN Climate Conference (COP21) in Paris, where Canada agreed to take measures to back the transition to a global low-carbon economy.

Mr.Carr said as part of that commitment, Canada’s Budget 2016 has proposed to provide billions of dollars to support clean energy.

Citing the fall in oil prices, he said it was an opportunity for countries to prepare for a transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy. On the proposed India-Canada Free Trade Agreement and bilateral investment treaty to boost trade and investment, he said it was in the interest of both the countries to expedite negotiations.

The Canadian Nuclear Horn (Daniel 7)

Canada to boost strategic ties with India with Defence, nuclear push 
NEW DELHI: Canada is planning to send a delegation to the Def Expo in Goa later this month to explore partnership in the area of defence electronics as it eyes an expansion in strategic ties with India, including an opportunity to set up nuclear reactors in the country.
India is among the top priorities for the Justin Trudeau government that came to power late last year, Canadian High Commissioner to India Nadir Patel told ET.
Last April PM Narendra Modi had the opportunity to meet Trudeau when the latter was the Opposition leader. A Canadian nuclear mission comprising nuclear firms and officials visited India in October last year and both sides have explored cooperation in pressurised heavy water reactors, training, capacity building and nuclear waste management.
“Following this visit there have been intense discussions between the officials of the two countries. Given the opportunity Canada could consider setting up nuclear reactors in India and upgrading Indian reactors run on CANDU (Canada Deuterium Uranium) technology,” Patel said.
Canada will follow the USA, Russia and France in setting up nuclear reactors in India if a decision is taken to allot the country a plant site.
Patel said Canada is partnering India in maintenance aspects of the nuclear sector. The civil nuclear partnership between the two countries entered a new phase with the conclusion of commercial pact during Modi’s trip for supply of uranium from the North American country to energy hungry India.
Following this the first tranche of uranium from Canada arrived here four decades after civil nuclear cooperation was suspended following the test at Pokhran. Canada will supply 3,000 metric tonnes of uranium beginning last year under a $254 million five-year deal to power Indian atomic reactors.

The Canadian Nuclear Horn Supplies India (Daniel 7)


First tranche of Canadian uranium for India’s nuclear reactors arrives after four decades
19 Dec, 2015, 0357 hrs IST, Dipanjan Roy Chaudhury, ET Bureau

NEW DELHI: Four decades after civil nuclear cooperation was suspended following the test at Pokhran, the first consignment of uranium from Canada for India’s nuclear reactors has arrived this month following conclusion of commercial pact between the two sides during PM visit last April.
This is the first tranche of uranium for India as committed under five year contract and launch of implementation of civil nuclear deal, Canadian High Commissioner to India Nadir Patel told ET in an exclusive interaction days after the consignment arrived. Canada, following the contract, will supply 3,000 metric tonne of uranium to energy-hungry India beginning this year under a $254 million five-year deal to power Indian atomic reactors.

“This consignment is first tangible result of the deal and has set the stage for partnership across full spectrum of nuclear energy ecosystem,” Patel pointed out. A Canadian nuclear mission comprising nuclear firms and officials visited India in October and both sides have explored cooperation in pressurized heavy water reactors, training, capacity building and nuclear waste management, said the Canadian envoy.

“The civil nuclear cooperation is also in keeping with PM Modi’s commitment of promoting clean energy in India and Canada will be a reliable partner,” noted Patel. An Indo-Canadian government to government Joint Working Group is holding discussions on expanding civil nuclear cooperation including further deliberations on Nuclear Liability Law. “While the insurance fund created by the Indian government has addressed concerns over the Liability Law, discussions are being held for a greater sense of comfort,” according to the envoy. There has been no discussion yet on the allotting any site for setting up nuclear power plant by a Canadian firm but such a possibility is not ruled out.
India and Canada signed a civil nuclear cooperation agreement in 2010. This was followed by the signing of an administrative arrangement in 2012 followed by the commercial contract to supply uranium this year.

The Canadian Nuclear Horn And India (Daniel 7:7)

Canada sends first consignment of uranium to India

TORONTO: Canada has sent the first uranium consignment of 250 tonnes to India for its nuclear power reactors, over two years after the civil nuclear deal signed between the two countries came into force.

“The first lot of 250 tonnes of Canadian uranium has been received in India,” a senior government official said.

In April, Cameco signed a uranium supply contract with India after the nuclear cooperation agreement between Canada and India came into force in September 2013.

According to the Canadian government, the contract to supply 7.1 million pounds of uranium concentrate (about 2,730 tonnes uranium) to India’s Department of Atomic Energy was worth around Canadian Dollars 350 million ($262 million).

The government of the Canadian province of Saskatchewan yesterday said the shipment consists of uranium mined and milled at Cameo’s McArthur River and Key Lake operations in northern Saskatchewan.

Saskatchewan premier Brad Wall said, “India has just received its first shipment of Saskatchewan uranium under the Canada-India nuclear cooperation agreement, and today we mark the economic milestone for our uranium mining industry and our province.”

India currently has 21 power reactors in operation, with another six under construction and scheduled to start up over the next four years. The country plans to increase its nuclear generating capacity from the current 5800 MWe to 27,500 MWe by 2032.

The Canadian Nuclear Horn (Daniel 7:7)


Canada Sends First Consignment of Uranium to India

By PTI Published: 06th December 2015 01:56 AM Last Updated: 06th December 2015 01:56 AM
TORONTO: Canada has sent the first consignment of uranium to India that will help it in securing fuel for nuclear power reactors, official sources said today.

The first lot of 250 tonnes of Canadian uranium has been received in India,” a senior government official said.

“The first shipment of uranium from Canada under a five-year contract signed in April has arrived in India. It marks Cameco’s first supply of uranium to India,” the sources said.

In April, Cameco signed a uranium supply contract with India after the nuclear cooperation agreement between Canada and India came into force in September 2013.

According to the Canadian government, the contract to supply 7.1 million pounds of uranium concentrate (about 2,730 tonnes uranium) to India’s Department of Atomic Energy was worth around CAD 350 million (USD 262 million).

The government of the Canadian province of Saskatchewan yesterday said the shipment consists of uranium mined and milled at Cameo’s McArthur River and Key Lake operations in northern Saskatchewan.

Saskatchewan premier Brad Wall said, “India has just received its first shipment of Saskatchewan uranium under the Canada-India nuclear cooperation agreement, and today we mark the economic milestone for our uranium mining industry and our province.”

India currently has 21 power reactors in operation, with another six under construction and scheduled to start up over the next four years. The country plans to increase its nuclear generating capacity from the current 5800 MWe to 27,500 MWe by 2032.

Quake Along The Ramapo Before The Sixth (Rev 6:12)Quake Along The Ramapo Before The Sixth (Rev 6:12)

 
Cornwall earthquake felt in parts of Quebec and N.Y. state

Daniel Martins
Digital Reporter

Saturday, November 28, 2015, 8:37 PM – People in eastern Ontario were rattled by an earthquake in the early morning hours Saturday, with reports of shaking in and around Cornwall, Ont. The quake was felt in Montreal and northern New York.

Earthquakes Canada rates the tremor at magnitude 3.6, though the United States Geological Survey (USGS) later rated it 3.3, which is relatively low on the scale. It struck in upstate New York, 15 km south of Cornwall.

However, its relatively shallow depth of 5 km made it noticeable to residents of the region, and reports of shaking have come in from eastern Ontario, upstate New York and Montreal.
No damage has been reported, but the Cornwall Seaway News said residents heard a loud crack before the rumbling started, lasting about 20 minutes.
 
Are earthquakes uncommon in eastern Canada?

That part of the country is prone to the occasional earthquake.

Towns in the Ottawa Valley were rattled by an earthquake on October 20. Natural resources Canada gave it a rating of Magnitude 3.8, striking a little after 7:30 p.m.

Most are not powerful enough to cause any major damage, but there are exceptions. In 1944, for example, a magnitude 5.8 quake caused about $20 million (in 2002 dollars) to Cornwall and Massena, New York.

According to the Cornwall Seaway News, a 2006 study by the Insurance Bureau of Canada says there is a 15 per cent chance a major earthquake will strike the Ottawa and St. Lawrence river valleys in the next half-century. Cornwall’s CAO told the News the city is in the process of updating its emergency plan.
 
“They are a risk,” Norm Levac says. “It’s something we’ve spent some time on.”

SOURCES: Earthquakes Canada | USGS | Cornwall Seaway New

The Canadian Nuclear Horn Opens (Daniel 7)

 
India to get first lot of Canadian uranium next month
25 Nov, 2015, 1656 hrs IST, PTI

NEW DELHI: India will gets its first consignment of Canadian uranium by next month, in a move that will help in securing fuel for nuclear power reactors in the country.
“The first lot of of 250 tonnes of Canadian uranium is already on its on way and should land by the first week of December. Since it is imported fuel it will be used in the safeguarded reactors,” a senior government official said.

The deal, worth CAD 350 million with Canada’s largest uranium producing company Cameco Corp, will ensure 3,220 metric tonnes of uranium over the next five years.

Signed in April this year when Prime Minister Narendra Modi visited the North American country, the development also assumes importance as Modi during his visit had given emphasis on the nuclear energy aspect.

The Indo-Canada civil nuclear cooperation was signed in 2010. Incidentally, Canada had banned exports of uranium and nuclear hardware to India in the 1970s after New Delhi developed a nuclear bomb.

India has 21 operational nuclear reactors and six under construction. India this year registered a record production of 1,252 MT of uranium, manufacturing close to double the annual fuel requirement of atomic reactors in the country. The production has far exceeded the country’s annual fuel requirement of 650 MT for the Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs), which means the country has surplus nuclear fuel that will last several months.

Every 700 MW of reactor needs 125 MT of uranium every year. However, with the rising number of power reactors in the country, the demand is expected to rise. In the near future, two nuclear reactors of 700 MW each in Rajasthan Atomic Power Station and Kakrapar Atomic Power Station are coming up.

Apart from Canada, India currently procures uranium from Kazakhstan and Russia for its domestic reactors. Fuel for its two foreign reactors at Kudankulam is being taken care of by Russia. It also buys enriched uranium for its two Boiling Water Reactors at Tarapur from Russia. Plus, it is in process of procuring the nuke fuel from Australia.

Four atomic reactors of 700 MW each are also coming up at the Gorakhpur Haryana Anu Vidyut Pariyojana. Fuel for Kudankulam plant in Tamil Nadu and Jaitapur in Maharashtra, coming up in collaboration with Russia and France respectively, will be made available by the foreign players.