A Lack Of Vigilance Before The Sixth Seal (Revelation 6:12)

       

Faults Underlying Exercise Vigilant GuardStory by: (Author NameStaff Sgt. Raymond Drumsta – 138th Public Affairs Detachment
Dated: Thu, Nov 5, 2009
This map illustrates the earthquake fault lines in Western New York. An earthquake in the region is a likely event, says University of Buffalo Professor Dr. Robert Jacobi.
TONAWANDA, NY — An earthquake in western New York, the scenario that Exercise Vigilant Guard is built around, is not that far-fetched, according to University of Buffalo geology professor Dr. Robert Jacobi.
When asked about earthquakes in the area, Jacobi pulls out a computer-generated state map, cross-hatched with diagonal lines representing geological faults.
The faults show that past earthquakes in the state were not random, and could occur again on the same fault systems, he said.
“In western New York, 6.5 magnitude earthquakes are possible,” he said.
This possibility underlies Exercise Vigilant Guard, a joint training opportunity for National Guard and emergency response organizations to build relationships with local, state, regional and federal partners against a variety of different homeland security threats including natural disasters and potential terrorist attacks.
The exercise was based on an earthquake scenario, and a rubble pile at the Spaulding Fibre site here was used to simulate a collapsed building. The scenario was chosen as a result of extensive consultations with the earthquake experts at the University of Buffalo’s Multidisciplinary Center for Earthquake Engineering Research (MCEER), said Brig. Gen. Mike Swezey, commander of 53rd Troop Command, who visited the site on Monday.
Earthquakes of up to 7 magnitude have occurred in the Northeastern part of the continent, and this scenario was calibrated on the magnitude 5.9 earthquake which occurred in Saguenay, Quebec in 1988, said Jacobi and Professor Andre Filiatrault, MCEER director.
“A 5.9 magnitude earthquake in this area is not an unrealistic scenario,” said Filiatrault.
Closer to home, a 1.9 magnitude earthquake occurred about 2.5 miles from the Spaulding Fibre site within the last decade, Jacobi said. He and other earthquake experts impaneled by the Atomic Energy Control Board of Canada in 1997 found that there’s a 40 percent chance of 6.5 magnitude earthquake occurring along the Clareden-Linden fault system, which lies about halfway between Buffalo and Rochester, Jacobi added.
Jacobi and Filiatrault said the soft soil of western New York, especially in part of downtown Buffalo, would amplify tremors, causing more damage.
“It’s like jello in a bowl,” said Jacobi.
The area’s old infrastructure is vulnerable because it was built without reinforcing steel, said Filiatrault. Damage to industrial areas could release hazardous materials, he added.
“You’ll have significant damage,” Filiatrault said.
Exercise Vigilant Guard involved an earthquake’s aftermath, including infrastructure damage, injuries, deaths, displaced citizens and hazardous material incidents. All this week, more than 1,300 National Guard troops and hundreds of local and regional emergency response professionals have been training at several sites in western New York to respond these types of incidents.
Jacobi called Exercise Vigilant Guard “important and illuminating.”
“I’m proud of the National Guard for organizing and carrying out such an excellent exercise,” he said.
Training concluded Thursday.

US Threatens the Chinese Nuclear Horn: Daniel 7

The USS Annapolis arrives at Apra Harbor, Guam, March 28, 2022, becoming the fifth fast-attack submarine to be homeported on the island.
The USS Annapolis arrives at Apra Harbor, Guam, on March 28, 2022, becoming the fifth fast-attack submarine to be homeported on the island. (U.S. Navy)

US Navy Sends ‘Chilling Message To China’; Deploys Its Fifth Attack Submarine To Guam Amid Beijing’s Belligerence

 Ashish Dangwal

 April 13, 2022

The US Navy announced on April 10 that the USS Annapolis, a fast-attack submarine, arrived at Naval Base Guam late last month, bolstering the service’s footprint in the Indo-Pacific. 

The Los Angeles-class submarine arrived in Apra Harbor of Guam on March 28 after completing its journey from Naval Base Point Loma in San Diego, according to the statement released by US Navy. 

The Navy states that the move is necessary due to the Indo-Pacific security environment, which necessitates deploying the most capable ships forward. 

“This posture allows rapid responses for maritime and joint forces, and brings our most capable ships and submarines with the greatest amount of striking power and operational capability to bear in the timeliest manner.”

Annapolis is the fifth Los Angeles-class fast-attack submarine to be currently stationed in Guam, joining the USS Asheville, USS Key West, USS Jefferson City, and USS Springfield. On March 21, the USS Springfield arrived at Guam a week before the USS Annapolis. 

“I would like to personally extend a warm Hafa Adai to the Sailors and families of our fifth homeported submarine on Guam, USS Annapolis,” Rear Adm. Benjamin Nicholson, commander of Joint Region Marianas, said in the release. Hafa adai is a greeting used by the Chamorro people of the Mariana Islands. 

“Guam and the Mariana Islands are incredibly important to the overall defense of the region, and this additional capability further underscores our commitment to a free and open Indo-Pacific,” he added.

The Los Angeles-class fast-attack submarines are a crucial part of the USA’s submarine force. While some of the early Los Angeles-class submarines have been decommissioned, they remain among the world’s quietest and most powerful submarines presently.

This could be one of the reasons why the US Navy has opted to relocate some of its Los Angeles-class submarines to Guam. The Los Angeles Class was preceded by the Sturgeon Class and succeeded by the Seawolf Class.

The Los Angeles Class was planned and built to be quieter than its predecessors while also carrying more modern sensor and weaponry systems. These cutting-edge vessels were also built to operate beneath the polar icecap. Their diving planes are mounted at the bows of the ships rather than on the sails, and their sails are stronger to penetrate thick ice.

The China Factor 

Guam, a strategically important island in Micronesia’s western Pacific Ocean, is playing an increasingly important role in the contentious, difficult, near-peer rivalry environment. It is a crucial component of the US military presence in the Indo-Pacific. In its 2019 Indo-Pacific Strategy Report, the Pentagon stated that it would be “modernizing its force posture” on the island.

The island serves as a tactical axis for all US forces in the region, providing crucial theatre operations and logistical support. Furthermore, it has some of the most important munitions and fuel storage capabilities in the Indo-Pacific, as well as crucial information, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) options and defenses for the island.

Early this year, the USS Nevada, a nuclear-powered submarine of the Ohio class that carries 20 Trident ballistic missiles and dozens of nuclear warheads, had docked at a Navy base in US Pacific Island territory, as previously reported by EurAsian Times.

Despite American frigates and destroyers routinely stationed at US naval ports or friendly countries, this one strikes out because it was a nuclear submarine. It was the first time a ballistic missile submarine, known as a “boomer,” had visited Guam since 2016, and only the second time since the 1980s.

The United States likes to keep the information related to its nuclear submarines a secret. However, making a port call signals an American statement of dominance and strength in the Indo-Pacific region.

“It sends a message — intended or not: we can park 100-odd nuclear warheads on your doorstep and you won’t even know it or be able to do much about it. And the reverse isn’t true and won’t be for a good while,” Thomas Shugart, a former US Navy submarine captain and now an analyst at the Center for a New American Security told CNN. 

Additionally, the Andersen Air Force Base, which takes up the majority of the island’s north part, is the only US base in the Western Pacific capable of storing heavy bombers for extended periods. During any potential conflict with China, Guam would be a critical location to monitor Beijing’s movements. Submarines departing from Guam’s Navy base can dive quickly into the deep sea to evade detection.

In recent years, the US has boosted its deployments with its allies around Guam island. The China factor is often regarded as the major driving force behind these developments. 

Guam is also within the attack range of China’s DF-26 intermediate-range ballistic missile, which can kill targets up to 3,400 miles away. It’s no surprise that China has labeled this missile “the Guam Killer.” 

IRGC Wants to Kill Babylon the Great: Revelation 16

Second anniversary of the killing of senior Iranian military commander General Qassem Soleimani

Iran Guards commander says death of all US leaders would not avenge Soleimani killing

Reuters

A banner of Qassem Soleimani, is seen during a ceremony to mark the second anniversary of the killing of senior Iranian military commander General Qassem Soleimani in a U.S. attack, in Tehran, Iran January 3, 2022. Majid Asgaripour/WANA (West Asia News Agency) via REUTERS

DUBAI, April 13 (Reuters) – The killing of all American leaders would not be enough to avenge the U.S. assassination of Iran’s Revolutionary Guards’ top commander Qassem Soleimani two years ago, a senior Iranian Guards commander said on Wednesday.

The United States and Iran came close to full-blown conflict in 2020 after Soleimani’s killing in a U.S. drone attack at Baghdad airport and Tehran’s retaliation by attacking U.S. bases in Iraq.Report ad

“Martyr Soleimani was such a great character that if all American leaders are killed, this will still not avenge his assassination,” senior commander of the Revolutionary Guards (IRGC) Mohammad Pakpour was quoted as saying by Iranian state media.

“We should avenge him by following Soleimani’s path and through other methods.”

Then-U.S. President Donald Trump’s administration said Soleimani was targeted for plotting future attacks on U.S. interests and that he had helped coordinate strikes on American forces in Iraq in the past through militia proxies.

Pakpour’s comments came days after U.S. Army General Mark Milley, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said that he does not support removing Iran’s Quds Force, an arm of its Revolutionary Guards (IRGC), from a list of foreign terrorist organizations, as demanded by Tehran for the revival of a 2015 nuclear deal.

Trump abandoned the deal under which Iran had agreed to curbs on its nuclear programme in return for the lifting of international financial sanctions, and Iran responded by violating its limits. President Joe Biden aims to restore it.

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Almost a year of indirect talks between Iran and the United States have stalled since March as both Tehran and Washington blame each other for failing to settle remaining issues. One of the unresolved questions is whether the United States would remove Iran’s Guards from the terrorist list.

Washington has been considering removing the IRGC from its foreign terrorist organization blacklist in return for Iranian assurances about reining in the elite force’s influence in the Middle East.

Critics of dropping the IRGC from the list, as well as those open to the idea, say doing so will have little economic effect because other U.S. sanctions force foreign actors to shun the group. 

Iran’s top authority, Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, said on Tuesday that his country’s future should not be tied to the success or collapse of nuclear talks with world powers.

The British Upgrade Her Nuclear Horn: Daniel 7

The entrance to British Royal Air Force base RAF Lakenheath
The entrance to RAF Lakenheath where the upgraded vaults are believed to be. Photograph: Chris Radburn/AFP/Getty Images

UK military vaults upgraded to store new US nuclear weapons

A US 2023 budget request shows the UK is one of several European countries where investment is under way at ‘special weapons’ storage sites

Julian Borger in Washington and Dan SabbaghTue 12 Apr 2022 15.25 EDT

Military bunkers in the UK are being upgraded so they can be used to store US nuclear weapons again after 14 years of standing empty, according to US defence budget documents.

In the Biden administration’s 2023 defence budget request, the UK was added to the list of countries where infrastructure investment is under way at “special weapons” storage sites, alongside Belgium, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands and Turkey – all countries where the US stores an estimated 100 B61 nuclear bombs.

Hans Kristensen, the director of the nuclear information project at the Federation of American Scientists (FAS), who first reported on the budget item, said he believed the British site being upgraded is the US airbase at RAF Lakenheath, 100 km north-east of London.

The US withdrew its B61 munitions from Lakenheath in 2008, marking the end of more than half a century of maintaining a US nuclear stockpile in the UK. At the time of the withdrawal, the gravity bombs were widely seen as militarily obsolete and hopes were higher for further disarmament by the nuclear weapons powers.

That optimism has since been dashed, against the backdrop of Vladimir Putin’s invasion of Ukraine, his regime’s nuclear threats against Nato, and extensive nuclear weapon modernisation programmes pursued by both the US and Russia. As part of the US plan, the B61 has been given a new lease of life with a guidance system, the B61-12 variant, due to go into full production in May.

The 2023 budget request says that Nato “is wrapping up a 13-year, $384m infrastructure investment program at storage sites in Belgium, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, the UK, and Turkey to upgrade security measures, communication systems, and facilities”.

In the 1990s, RAF Lakenheath had 33 underground storage vaults, where 110 B61 bombs were stored, according to the FAS. Since their withdrawal the vaults have been mothballed. Kristensen said he believes the vaults are now being upgraded so the new B61-12 bombs can be stored there, if needed.

The Biden administration has been careful not to make any moves that might be seen as escalatory in the nuclear arena in response to Putin’s announcement he would put Russia’s nuclear forces on higher alert a few days after his invasion of Ukraine. The US has cancelled scheduled tests of its intercontinental ballistic missiles, for example.

For the same reason, Kristensen said he doubted the Biden administration is planning to increase the US nuclear stockpile in Europe. When the new B61-12 bombs are delivered, expected next year, they will replace older models already there. Instead, he thought the Lakenheath upgrade is intended to provided more flexibility to move the nuclear weapons around Europe.

“One of the things they have talked about is protecting the deterrent against Russia’s improved cruise missiles capabilities,” Kristensen said. “So they could be trying to beef up the readiness of more sites without them necessarily receiving nukes, so that they have the options to move things around in a contingency if they need to.”

Britain has become keen to take a more assertive role when it comes to its own nuclear deterrent, and last year announced it would increase its own stockpile of Trident nuclear warheads by 40% to 260, the first such increase since the end of the cold war. Whitehall sources say the UK has “a clearer appreciation” of its role as a nuclear weapons state in a renewed era of state competition with Russia and China.

The UK Ministry of Defence did not comment on the upgrade mentioned in the US budget. One British official said: “We won’t provide anything on this as it relates to the storage of nuclear weapons.” But the news comes just four months after the arrival in Lakenheath of the first of a new generation of nuclear-capable US combat aircraft, the F-35A Lightning II, the first such deployment in Europe.

Daryl Kimball, the executive director of the Arms Control Association, said the upgrade of the UK storage facilities is “an early sign that the US and Nato are preparing to engage in a protracted and maybe heightened standoff with Putin’s Russia”.

“The administration should provide some clarity about the military necessity and goals of possibly bringing nuclear weapons back to the UK,” Kimball added.

The developments in Europe are part of a broader retreat from arms control. The Biden administration’s nuclear posture review, which has been sent to Congress but not yet declassified, is reported not to contain the changes the president pledged during his campaign.

In 2020, he said he would formally declare the sole purpose of nuclear weapons to be deterrence of a nuclear attack against the United States or its allies. But the review leaves open the option of using nuclear arms to respond to non-nuclear threats as well.

The nuclear disarmament group CND said the “quiet announcement” by the US amounted to more militarisation at a time of growing risk and would add to the risks faced by the British public. Kate Hudson, the general secretary of CND, said she feared it could lead to US warheads being redeployed in the UK. “Nuclear weapons don’t make us safe – they make us a target,” she added.

Weapons for the First Nuclear War: Revelation 8

How Will Pakistan’s Shaheen-3 Missile Compete Against India’s “Fire-Breathing” ICBM Agni-5?

This was the missile’s second test in the previous two years, with the first taking place on January 20, 2021. The “test flight was aimed at revalidating several design and technical characteristics of the weapon system,” according to Pakistan’s DG ISPR, although the timing of the test raises issues.

Is Shaheen-III a missile system aimed against India’s northeast?

After India successfully test-fired Agni-III, a missile capable of reaching any target inside Pakistan, the development phase of Shaheen-III began in the early 2000s.

The Shaheen-III is a land-based surface-to-surface medium-range ballistic missile with nuclear capability. The missile was initially fired on March 9, 2015, and was later showcased at a military parade in March 2016.

With a range of 2,750 kilometres, it is Pakistan’s longest-range missile. The missile is propelled by a two-stage solid propellant system. A Chinese transporter erector launcher was used to launch the road-mobile missile. Shaheen-III was meant to attack India’s northeast and island commands, according to Lieutenant General (Retd) Khalid Kidwai.

“Shaheen-III is designed to reach Indian islands so that India cannot utilise them as “strategic bases” to create “second-strike capabilities,” the general said in an interview at the Carnegie International Nuclear Policy Conference in 2015.

Given that the Shaheen-III is Pakistan’s most powerful missile, testing it against India’s most powerful nuclear-capable missile, the Agni-V, is critical. The Defense Research and Development Organization created the Agni-V, a nuclear-capable intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) (DRDO).

The missile has a range of 5,500-8,000 kilometres in operation.

Agni-V is a three-stage solid propellant spacecraft that is delivered by truck and launched using a canister. During the final phase, it reaches a maximum velocity of Mach 24. It is directed by an inertial navigation system with a ring laser gyroscope that can hit a target within 30 metres.

Agni-V, on the other hand, was designed primarily to strengthen India’s nuclear deterrence against China. Agni-V can reach China’s eastern seaboard, where the majority of the country’s economic activity is concentrated, with a range of more than 5,000 kilometres.

In 2018, India’s Strategic Forces Command deployed the missile.

Given that the Shaheen-III is Pakistan’s most powerful missile, testing it against India’s most powerful nuclear-capable missile, the Agni-V, is critical.

Versatility Offered By Agni-V

The Defense Research and Development Organization created the Agni-V, a nuclear-capable intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) (DRDO). The missile has a range of 5,500-8,000 kilometres in operation.

Agni-V is a three-stage solid propellant spacecraft that is delivered by truck and launched using a canister. During the final phase, it reaches a maximum velocity of Mach 24. It is directed by an inertial navigation system with a ring laser gyroscope that can hit a target within 30 metres.

Agni-V, on the other hand, was designed primarily to strengthen India’s nuclear deterrence against China.

Agni-III, like Shaheen-III, features a two-staged solid propellant propulsion system. In terms of mobility and launch versatility, Agni-III outperforms Shaheen-III.

Agni-III is both rail and road-mobile, whereas Shaheen-III is solely road-mobile. Shaheen-3’s guiding system is inferior to Agni- III’s. Agni-III is guided by GPS satellites and uses the same Ring Laser Gyroscope inertial navigation technology as Agni-V. Night experiments are also being conducted by the DRDO to improve the missile’s capability and establish readiness to handle the weapon at night.

Pakistan sees Shaheen-III as a credible deterrent against India’s superior missile capability because of its increased range.

“Pakistan appears to be looking at competing with India, and Pakistan’s ambitions seem to revolve around generating a credible deterrence, and a credible deterrence is certain to increase strategic stability,” said Farrukh Salim, a Pakistani political scientist.

Pakistan believes the Shaheen-III will thwart India’s second-strike capability. It is important to remember, however, that India possesses a fully operational nuclear triad, and that simply striking its land-based launching sites will not render India’s second-strike capability inoperable.

With the introduction of Shaheen-III, Pakistan has made significant progress in establishing credible deterrent. They are, however, still far behind India in terms of missile technology. Even with China’s assistance, they will take years to catch up.

Hamas says ready for a six-month war outside the Temple Walls: Revelation 11

Rafah airstrike Gaza Israeli war

Hamas says ready for a six-month war with Israel

Sally Ibrahim

12 April, 2022

“The Palestinian resistance will not remain silent (…) We have prepared for the enemy and we have enough to fight a battle for six consecutive months,” said Zaher Jabarin, a member of the Hamas political bureau.

“The Palestinian resistance will not remain silent (…) We have prepared for the enemy and we have enough to fight a battle for six consecutive months,” Jabarin said. [Getty]

Hamas is ready for a six-month war with Israel, a senior official at the Islamic movement said to Beirut-based al-Mayadeen TV on Monday.

“There is an Israeli plan to storm Al-Aqsa on the 15th of Ramadan, and this is the most dangerous thing the enemy can do,” said Zaher Jabarin, a member of the Hamas political bureau.

“The Palestinian resistance will not remain silent (…) We have prepared for the enemy and we have enough to fight a battle for six consecutive months,” Jabarin added.

Meanwhile, several extremist Jewish groups called on Israelis to take part in an initiative to hold “Passover sacrifice” on the courtyards of Al-Aqsa Mosque to be held next Friday.

The groups announced a financial reward of $US 3,200 to those who were able to bring livestock to the compound and successfully carry out sacrifices, while $US 200 were offered to those who were able to enter the Al-Aqsa compound yet were unable to sacrifice the livestock and $US 120 to those who attempted and failed to enter. 

The call comes after Jewish extremist groups held a mock ceremony on Monday at the southern wall of Al-Aqsa Mosque.

A source close to Hamas, who preferred to be unnamed, told The New Arab, “the movement has conveyed a message to the Egyptians that holding Jewish religious rituals and slaughtering livestock inside Al-Aqsa Mosque, are crossing red lines, and will lead to an explosion of the situation.”

The source noted that “the resistance informed the Egyptians that [Israel’s] reliance on any improvements in the Gaza Strip and its isolation from occupied Jerusalem and the West Bank, is a wrong assessment.”

“[Israel] has only one option in the coming days: prevent provocations in Jerusalem, the Al-Aqsa Mosque and the West Bank, especially the city of Jenin,” the source added.

For weeks now, the occupied Palestinian territories in the West Bank and Jerusalem have witnessed an increase of tensions between Palestinians and Israelis, which led to the killing of at least 15 Palestinians and 14 Israelis.

China’s Hypersonic Nuclear Horn: Daniel 7

Chinese military vehicles carrying DF-17 ballistic missiles roll during a parade to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the founding of Communist China in Beijing, on Oct. 1, 2019. U.S. Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin said Thursday, Dec. 2, 2021, that China’s pursuit of hypersonic weapons “increases tensions in the region” and vowed the U.S. would maintain its capability to deter potential threats posed by China. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan, File)
Chinese military vehicles carrying DF-17 ballistic missiles roll during a parade to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the founding of Communist China in Beijing, on Oct. 1, 2019. U.S. Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin said Thursday, Dec. 2, 2021, that China’s … more >

China’s orbiting hypersonic missile part of growing space-based arsenal, DIA warns

July ICBM launch is Beijing’s longest range land attack weapon, U.S. intelligence says

By Bill Gertz – The Washington Times – Tuesday, April 12, 2022

China’s test of an orbiting hypersonic missile last year demonstrated Beijing’s longest range land attack weapon and is part of a growing arsenal of space warfare capabilities, according to a Defense Intelligence Agency report on space threats released Tuesday.

The hypersonic missile test in July was one element of the arsenal of space weaponry built and deployed by China and Russia that is aimed at attacking U.S. satellites used by the military for communications and precision-guided missiles, the DIA report states. Joint Chiefs of Staff head Gen. Mark A. Milley last fall memorably called the Chinese hypersonic test “very close to a Sputnik moment” for U.S. military planners.

“The loss of space-based communication and navigation services could have a devastating impact on warfighters during a conflict — that’s one of the most serious scenarios anticipated,” DIA Director Lt. Gen. Scott Berrier said in releasing the report.

“A secure, stable and accessible space domain is crucial as China and Russia’s space-based capabilities and electronic-warfare activities continue to grow,” Gen. Berrier added.

Space-based electronic systems are used in homes, transportation networks, the electrical grid, banking systems and for conducting military operations around the world, the report said. 


“Adversaries have observed more than 30 years of U.S. military operations supported by space systems and are now seeking ways to expand their own capabilities and deny the U.S. a space-enabled advantage,” the report said.