The Sixth Seal: More Than Just Manhattan (Revelation 6:12)

New York, NY – In a Quake, Brooklyn Would Shake More Than Manhattan
By Brooklyn Eagle
New York, NY – The last big earthquake in the New York City area, centered in New York Harbor just south of Rockaway, took place in 1884 and registered 5.2 on the Richter Scale.Another earthquake of this size can be expected and could be quite damaging, says Dr. Won-Young Kim, senior research scientist at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University.
And Brooklyn, resting on sediment, would shake more than Manhattan, built on solid rock. “There would be more shaking and more damage,” Dr. Kim told the Brooklyn Eagle on Wednesday.
If an earthquake of a similar magnitude were to happen today near Brooklyn, “Many chimneys would topple. Poorly maintained buildings would fall down – some buildings are falling down now even without any shaking. People would not be hit by collapsing buildings, but they would be hit by falling debris. We need to get some of these buildings fixed,” he said.
But a 5.2 is “not comparable to Haiti,” he said. “That was huge.” Haiti’s devastating earthquake measured 7.0.
Brooklyn has a different environment than Haiti, and that makes all the difference, he said. Haiti is situated near tectonic plate.
“The Caribbean plate is moving to the east, while the North American plate is moving towards the west. They move about 20 mm – slightly less than an inch – every year.” The plates are sliding past each other, and the movement is not smooth, leading to jolts, he said.
While we don’t have the opportunity for a large jolt in Brooklyn, we do have small, frequent quakes of a magnitude of 2 or 3 on the Richter Scale. In 2001 alone the city experienced two quakes: one in January, measuring 2.4, and one in October, measuring 2.6. The October quake, occurring soon after Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, “caused a lot of panic,” Dr. Kim said.
“People ask me, ‘Should I get earthquake insurance?’ I tell them no, earthquake insurance is expensive. Instead, use that money to fix chimneys and other things. Rather than panicky preparations, use common sense to make things better.”
Secure bookcases to the wall and make sure hanging furniture does not fall down, Dr. Kim said. “If you have antique porcelains or dishes, make sure they’re safely stored. In California, everything is anchored to the ground.”
While a small earthquake in Brooklyn may cause panic, “In California, a quake of magnitude 2 is called a micro-quake,” he added.

Heavy Toll Outside the Temple Walls: Revelation 11

Timeline: Israel-Hamas Fighting Has Taken A Dire Toll

Timeline: Israel-Hamas Fighting Has Taken A Dire Toll
NPR Staff The Associated Press
Updated May 20, 20214:29 PM ET

A fire rages at sunrise in the city of Khan Yunis following an Israeli airstrike in the southern Gaza Strip early on May 12.
Youssef Massoud/AFP via Getty Images
Tensions boil over in Jerusalem. Hamas fires rockets from Gaza into Israel. Israel unleashes its heavy firepower, causing casualties and destruction. Then it all repeats again and again. It is a familiar, devastating cycle of violence that has prompted protests around the world.

On Thursday, Israel’s government announced a cease-fire after 11 days of fighting with Hamas. If the agreement holds, it will end the heaviest round of fighting since 2014.

Map of Israel and surrounding countries
Israel’s bombardments in Gaza have left more than 200 Palestinians dead, according to the territory’s Health Ministry, and toppled large buildings and displaced many families.

Most of Hamas’ rockets are intercepted by Israeli defenses. But the attacks force Israelis to take shelter, and the rockets that get through have killed 12 people and caused damage.

The fighting is rooted in the decades-old Israeli-Palestinian conflict and comes after Israel and Hamas have fought several wars in the past decade and a half. Hamas is an Islamist movement that’s designated a terrorist group by Israel, the United States and many European countries.

This year, the International Criminal Court launched an investigation into possible war crimes committed by Israel and Palestinian militants during the last round of heavy fighting in Gaza, in 2014. The court has warned that the latest fighting could be investigated as well.

Here is a look at some key events in the Israel-Hamas conflict:

September 2005

Israel withdraws settlements and military personnel from the Gaza Strip, which it began to occupy after capturing the territory during the 1967 Six-Day War.

January 2006

Hamas wins an overwhelming victory in Palestinian parliamentary elections, sparking a struggle for primacy with its rival, the Fatah movement led by Mahmoud Abbas, who remains president of the Palestinian Authority to this day. Fatah is much stronger in the West Bank, while Hamas is the main power in Gaza.

That June, Hamas militants cross a tunnel from Gaza and attack an Israeli military base, killing two Israeli soldiers and capturing service member Gilad Shalit. Israel invades Gaza.

June 2007

Hamas violently ousts Fatah forces from the Gaza Strip and solidifies its control of the territory. Israel and Egypt tighten their blockade of Gaza, which will devastate Gaza’s economy over the next decade. Two rival governments emerge: Hamas in Gaza and Abbas’ Palestinian Authority in the West Bank.

December 2008

In response to heavy rocket fire from Gaza, Israel launches a major three-week offensive. After a 22-day war that kills 1,200 Palestinians and 13 Israelis, the two sides announce a cease-fire.

March 2009

Benjamin Netanyahu, leader of the Likud party, becomes prime minister of Israel a second time. His long tenure eventually emboldens Israeli religious nationalists, accelerating settlement expansion and signaling opposition to a two-state solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

October 2011

Hamas releases Shalit, the Israeli soldier it captured in the 2006 raid. Israel releases the first group of what will be more than 1,000 freed Palestinian prisoners.

Also in 2011, Israel’s Iron Dome missile defense system becomes active and effectively blocks its first rocket from Gaza.

November 2012

Israel kills Hamas military chief Ahmed Jabari, sparking eight days of militant rocket fire from Gaza and an Israeli air campaign. Egyptian mediators secure a cease-fire after some 150 Palestinians and six Israelis are killed.


Israel’s Iron Dome missile defense system (left) intercepts rockets fired by Hamas from Gaza toward Israel early on May 16. Israel activated the system in 2011 and credits it with stopping many rockets, but some do get through.
Mohammed Abed/AFP via Getty Images
July-August 2014

Following the kidnapping and killing of three Israeli teenagers by Hamas members, Israel conducts a sweep against Hamas in the West Bank, prompting rocket attacks from Gaza and Israeli air raids. The seven-week conflict that ensues results in more than 2,200 Palestinian deaths in Gaza, more than half of them civilians. In Israel, 67 soldiers and six civilians are killed. Israel comes under heavy international criticism for its use of what the United Nations calls disproportionate force.

December 2017

President Donald Trump recognizes Israel’s claim to Jerusalem as its capital and directs the State Department to move the U.S. Embassy there. Palestinians seek part of Jerusalem for their capital. Hamas calls for a Palestinian uprising.

March 2018

Along the Gaza perimeter fence, Palestinian protesters, led by Hamas, stage massive demonstrations against the blockade of Gaza. Although mostly unarmed, many protesters burn tires, throw rocks and grenades at Israeli troops and damage the perimeter fence. Israeli troops kill more than 170 protesters over a period of several months. Israel says it is defending its border but is accused of using excessive force. Israel and Hamas engage in a number of rounds of intense but brief fighting during this time.


Palestinians run for cover from tear gas launched by Israeli security forces near the border between Israel and the Gaza Strip, east of Jabalia, on May 14, 2018, as Palestinians protest over the inauguration of the U.S. Embassy following its controversial move to Jerusalem.
Mohammed Abed/AFP via Getty Images
November 2018

Violence flares up after an Israeli undercover raid into Gaza kills seven Palestinian militants and a senior Israeli army officer, marking the most serious escalation since the war in 2014. Gaza militants fire hundreds of rockets at Israel, killing a Palestinian laborer in southern Israel. At least seven Palestinians, among them five militants, are killed in Gaza.

March 2021

The International Criminal Court opens an investigation into alleged crimes by Israelis and Palestinians since 2014.

May 2021

Hamas fires long-range rockets toward Jerusalem in support of Palestinian protests against Israel’s heavy-handed policing of the Al-Aqsa Mosque compound in Jerusalem and the threatened eviction of dozens of Palestinian families by Jewish settlers. Israel launches airstrikes on Gaza. The Israel Defense Forces say 3,750 rockets are fired from Gaza at Israel, 90% of them intercepted. Israel steps up its aerial assaults in densely populated Gaza, toppling high-rise buildings and killing 230 Palestinians, according to the Hamas-run Health Ministry. Israel says militants’ rockets kill 12 people in Israel. On May 20, the Israeli prime minister’s office announces a cease-fire.


NPR Staff The Associated Press
Updated May 20, 20214:29 PM ET

A fire rages at sunrise in the city of Khan Yunis following an Israeli airstrike in the southern Gaza Strip early on May 12.
Youssef Massoud/AFP via Getty Images
Tensions boil over in Jerusalem. Hamas fires rockets from Gaza into Israel. Israel unleashes its heavy firepower, causing casualties and destruction. Then it all repeats again and again. It is a familiar, devastating cycle of violence that has prompted protests around the world.

On Thursday, Israel’s government announced a cease-fire after 11 days of fighting with Hamas. If the agreement holds, it will end the heaviest round of fighting since 2014.

Map of Israel and surrounding countries
Israel’s bombardments in Gaza have left more than 200 Palestinians dead, according to the territory’s Health Ministry, and toppled large buildings and displaced many families.

Most of Hamas’ rockets are intercepted by Israeli defenses. But the attacks force Israelis to take shelter, and the rockets that get through have killed 12 people and caused damage.

The fighting is rooted in the decades-old Israeli-Palestinian conflict and comes after Israel and Hamas have fought several wars in the past decade and a half. Hamas is an Islamist movement that’s designated a terrorist group by Israel, the United States and many European countries.

This year, the International Criminal Court launched an investigation into possible war crimes committed by Israel and Palestinian militants during the last round of heavy fighting in Gaza, in 2014. The court has warned that the latest fighting could be investigated as well.

Here is a look at some key events in the Israel-Hamas conflict:

September 2005

Israel withdraws settlements and military personnel from the Gaza Strip, which it began to occupy after capturing the territory during the 1967 Six-Day War.

January 2006

Hamas wins an overwhelming victory in Palestinian parliamentary elections, sparking a struggle for primacy with its rival, the Fatah movement led by Mahmoud Abbas, who remains president of the Palestinian Authority to this day. Fatah is much stronger in the West Bank, while Hamas is the main power in Gaza.

That June, Hamas militants cross a tunnel from Gaza and attack an Israeli military base, killing two Israeli soldiers and capturing service member Gilad Shalit. Israel invades Gaza.

June 2007

Hamas violently ousts Fatah forces from the Gaza Strip and solidifies its control of the territory. Israel and Egypt tighten their blockade of Gaza, which will devastate Gaza’s economy over the next decade. Two rival governments emerge: Hamas in Gaza and Abbas’ Palestinian Authority in the West Bank.

December 2008

In response to heavy rocket fire from Gaza, Israel launches a major three-week offensive. After a 22-day war that kills 1,200 Palestinians and 13 Israelis, the two sides announce a cease-fire.

March 2009

Benjamin Netanyahu, leader of the Likud party, becomes prime minister of Israel a second time. His long tenure eventually emboldens Israeli religious nationalists, accelerating settlement expansion and signaling opposition to a two-state solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

October 2011

Hamas releases Shalit, the Israeli soldier it captured in the 2006 raid. Israel releases the first group of what will be more than 1,000 freed Palestinian prisoners.

Also in 2011, Israel’s Iron Dome missile defense system becomes active and effectively blocks its first rocket from Gaza.

November 2012

Israel kills Hamas military chief Ahmed Jabari, sparking eight days of militant rocket fire from Gaza and an Israeli air campaign. Egyptian mediators secure a cease-fire after some 150 Palestinians and six Israelis are killed.

Israel’s Iron Dome missile defense system (left) intercepts rockets fired by Hamas from Gaza toward Israel early on May 16. Israel activated the system in 2011 and credits it with stopping many rockets, but some do get through.
Mohammed Abed/AFP via Getty Images
July-August 2014

Following the kidnapping and killing of three Israeli teenagers by Hamas members, Israel conducts a sweep against Hamas in the West Bank, prompting rocket attacks from Gaza and Israeli air raids. The seven-week conflict that ensues results in more than 2,200 Palestinian deaths in Gaza, more than half of them civilians. In Israel, 67 soldiers and six civilians are killed. Israel comes under heavy international criticism for its use of what the United Nations calls disproportionate force.

December 2017

President Donald Trump recognizes Israel’s claim to Jerusalem as its capital and directs the State Department to move the U.S. Embassy there. Palestinians seek part of Jerusalem for their capital. Hamas calls for a Palestinian uprising.

March 2018

Along the Gaza perimeter fence, Palestinian protesters, led by Hamas, stage massive demonstrations against the blockade of Gaza. Although mostly unarmed, many protesters burn tires, throw rocks and grenades at Israeli troops and damage the perimeter fence. Israeli troops kill more than 170 protesters over a period of several months. Israel says it is defending its border but is accused of using excessive force. Israel and Hamas engage in a number of rounds of intense but brief fighting during this time.

Palestinians run for cover from tear gas launched by Israeli security forces near the border between Israel and the Gaza Strip, east of Jabalia, on May 14, 2018, as Palestinians protest over the inauguration of the U.S. Embassy following its controversial move to Jerusalem.
Mohammed Abed/AFP via Getty Images
November 2018

Violence flares up after an Israeli undercover raid into Gaza kills seven Palestinian militants and a senior Israeli army officer, marking the most serious escalation since the war in 2014. Gaza militants fire hundreds of rockets at Israel, killing a Palestinian laborer in southern Israel. At least seven Palestinians, among them five militants, are killed in Gaza.

March 2021

The International Criminal Court opens an investigation into alleged crimes by Israelis and Palestinians since 2014.

May 2021

Hamas fires long-range rockets toward Jerusalem in support of Palestinian protests against Israel’s heavy-handed policing of the Al-Aqsa Mosque compound in Jerusalem and the threatened eviction of dozens of Palestinian families by Jewish settlers. Israel launches airstrikes on Gaza. The Israel Defense Forces say 3,750 rockets are fired from Gaza at Israel, 90% of them intercepted. Israel steps up its aerial assaults in densely populated Gaza, toppling high-rise buildings and killing 230 Palestinians, according to the Hamas-run Health Ministry. Israel says militants’ rockets kill 12 people in Israel. On May 20, the Israeli prime minister’s office announces a cease-fire.

Russia Threatens the other Nuclear Horns: Daniel 7

MOSCOW — Russian President Vladimir Putin alleged Thursday that some of the country’s foreign foes dream about biting off pieces of the country’s vast territory, warning that Moscow would “knock their teeth out” if they ever try.

In strong remarks during a conference call with officials, the Russian president noted that foreign efforts to contain Russia date from centuries ago.

“In all times, the same thing happened: once Russia grew stronger, they found pretexts to hamper its development,” Putin said, alleging that some critics of Russia who he didn’t name have argued that it’s unfair for it to keep its vast natural riches all to itself.

“Everyone wants to bite us or bite something off us, but those who would like to do so should know that we would knock their teeth out so that they couldn’t bite,” the Russian leader said. “The development of our military is the guarantee of that.”

The Kremlin has made the modernization of the country’s armed forces a top priority amid tensions in relations with the U.S. and its allies. Russia-West ties have sunk to post-Cold War lows over Moscow’s 2014 annexation of Ukraine’s Crimean Peninsula, accusations of Russian meddling in elections, hacking attacks, and other issues.

Putin said that Western sanctions against Russia are continuing a longtime historic trend of containing a powerful rival, citing Russian Czar Alexander III who charged that “everyone is afraid of our vastness.”

“Even after we lost one-third of our potential” when former Soviet republics became independent after the 1991 collapse of the Soviet Union, “Russia is still too big for some,” Putin said.

“No matter what we do, no matter how we try to satisfy the appetites of those who are trying to contain us, the containment will continue because many of our opponents just don’t want such a country as Russia,” Putin said. “But we, citizens of the Russian Federation need it, and we will do everything to not just preserve but strengthen it.”

He claimed that Russia now has the most modern strategic nuclear forces compared to other nuclear powers, including such state-of-the-art weapons as the Avangard hypersonic glide vehicle.

The military has said that the Avangard is capable of flying 27 times faster than the speed of sound and making sharp maneuvers on its way to target to dodge the enemy’s missile shield.

It has been fitted to the existing Soviet-built intercontinental ballistic missiles instead of older type warheads, and the first unit armed with the Avangard entered duty in December 2019. The military said that in the future Avangard could be fitted to the prospective heavy missile called Sarmat that is under development.

Putin has also touted other prospective weapons, including the Poseidon atomic-powered underwater drone armed with a nuclear weapon that is capable of generating devastating tsunami waves near an enemy coast. Its tests are continuing.

Putin has charged that the country has succeeded in revamping its arsenals without inflicting too heavy a burden on the national economy by carefully choosing the military priorities.

He noted that Russia this year is set to spend an equivalent of $42 billion on defense, compared to the Pentagon’s budget topping $700 billion.

“We have managed to support our armed forces without militarizing the state budget, and we will continue doing so,” Putin said.

The Growing UK Nuclear Horn: Daniel 7

Why does the UK want more nuclear weapons? | The Strategist


20 May 2021Wyn Rees and Azriel Bermant
Why does the UK want more nuclear weapons?

In March, the United Kingdom took many nuclear policy experts by surprise with its announcement that it was increasing the cap on its nuclear stockpile from 225 to 260 warheads. This reversal of decades of reductions of the UK’s nuclear stockpile was spelled out in the government’s ‘integrated review’ of security and defence policy.

When Britain obtained the Trident D5 missile from the United States in the early 1980s, the capability exceeded UK military needs and the decision was taken not to deploy the maximum number of warheads on the missile. The Trident submarines could carry more warheads and strike more accurately than the UK believed was necessary.

The size of the UK nuclear force has been guided over the years by considerations of what constitutes a ‘minimum deterrent’. The UK has sought to put a certain number of enemy targets at risk.

Missile defences around Moscow led the UK to improve the penetrability of its former Polaris missile under the ‘Chevaline’ program in the 1970s to ensure that its warheads could pierce those defences.

The size of the UK’s deterrent has been gauged in concert with the much larger US capability. The UK and its allies have historically been concerned that the US might be reluctant to use its nuclear forces in defence of its allies and have believed it necessary to possess a ‘second centre of decision-making’ in which their own weapons could be used in a supreme national emergency.

The British government says the decision to expand its nuclear stockpile is driven by a deterioration in the strategic landscape and technological threats. Russia has been overhauling its nuclear forces since 2007 and investing in new technologies such as underwater nuclear drones and hypersonic missiles. China has been increasing its nuclear capabilities and its current hostility towards Taiwan increases the risk of a China–US confrontation.

In addition, the UK is mindful of the need to deter newly proliferating countries as well as novel threats such as cyberattacks. The UK has committed to replacing its four Trident submarines with a new generation of vessels to preserve its deterrent into the 2050s.

The surprise for some is that Russian improvements in missile defences have played a key role in the UK’s decision.

Western intelligence has been monitoring Russia’s comprehensive upgrade of its missile defences around Moscow and neighbouring areas, and it’s not the first time that anti-ballistic missile improvements around the Russian capital have influenced UK strategic thinking.

Recently declassified papers in Britain and the US demonstrate that such concerns were being expressed as far back as the early 1980s and even resulted in a spat between Margaret Thatcher’s government and Ronald Reagan’s administration, something we discuss in more depth in this article in the Journal of Strategic Studies. The main cause of those tensions was the determination of the Reagan administration to move ahead with its Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI).

US advocates of SDI regarded the 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile (ABM) Treaty as an obstacle that placed constraints on the deployment of US and Soviet missile defences. However, the British government regarded the ABM Treaty limiting the deployment of missile defences as essential to preserving strategic stability and enshrining a concept of deterrence based upon the threat of nuclear retaliation. It viewed this as the key to stability and to safeguarding the UK’s nuclear deterrent.

Britain was concerned that the possible demise of the ABM Treaty and the US deployment of space-based missile defences would lead to the Russians improving their own defensive systems with damaging consequences for Britain’s independent nuclear deterrent.

The George W. Bush administration eventually withdrew from the ABM Treaty in 2002. The treaty’s collapse has paved the way for advances in Russian missile defence systems as well as US anti-ballistic missile programs, creating the unease we now see in the British defence establishment.

Russian President Vladimir Putin has referred to the US withdrawal from the treaty as a justification for the development of new nuclear weapons that can penetrate US missile defences. Early in 2018 Putin stated:

After the US withdrew from the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty we’ve been working hard to develop new promising weaponry systems and this enabled us to make a big step forward creating new strategic arms … US global missile systems are mainly against ballistic missiles and these are the core of our nuclear deterrent. This is why Russia has been developing extremely effective systems to defeat missile defence and all our ICBMs are equipped with such systems now.

With its minimum deterrent, the UK is sensitive to the development by the Russians or Chinese of offensive or defensive nuclear systems that could undermine its strategic posture. The fears that surfaced 40 years ago are now becoming reality.

The UK has decided that increasing its offensive nuclear capabilities provides the most cost-effective way to offset the risks it faces and it’s prepared to tolerate the opprobrium of enlarging its stockpile of the most destructive weapons known to humankind.

Wyn Rees is professor of international security in the School of Politics and International Relations at the University of Nottingham. Azriel Bermant is a senior researcher at the Institute of International Relations Prague. Image: UK Ministry of Defence.

Israel-Hamas Fighting Outside the Temple Walls Has Taken A Dire Toll: Revelation 11

Timeline: Israel-Hamas Fighting Has Taken A Dire Toll


NPR Staff The Associated Press
Updated May 20, 20214:29 PM ET

A fire rages at sunrise in the city of Khan Yunis following an Israeli airstrike in the southern Gaza Strip early on May 12.
Youssef Massoud/AFP via Getty Images
Tensions boil over in Jerusalem. Hamas fires rockets from Gaza into Israel. Israel unleashes its heavy firepower, causing casualties and destruction. Then it all repeats again and again. It is a familiar, devastating cycle of violence that has prompted protests around the world.

On Thursday, Israel’s government announced a cease-fire after 11 days of fighting with Hamas. If the agreement holds, it will end the heaviest round of fighting since 2014.

Map of Israel and surrounding countries
Israel’s bombardments in Gaza have left more than 200 Palestinians dead, according to the territory’s Health Ministry, and toppled large buildings and displaced many families.

Most of Hamas’ rockets are intercepted by Israeli defenses. But the attacks force Israelis to take shelter, and the rockets that get through have killed 12 people and caused damage.

The fighting is rooted in the decades-old Israeli-Palestinian conflict and comes after Israel and Hamas have fought several wars in the past decade and a half. Hamas is an Islamist movement that’s designated a terrorist group by Israel, the United States and many European countries.

This year, the International Criminal Court launched an investigation into possible war crimes committed by Israel and Palestinian militants during the last round of heavy fighting in Gaza, in 2014. The court has warned that the latest fighting could be investigated as well.

Here is a look at some key events in the Israel-Hamas conflict:

September 2005

Israel withdraws settlements and military personnel from the Gaza Strip, which it began to occupy after capturing the territory during the 1967 Six-Day War.

January 2006

Hamas wins an overwhelming victory in Palestinian parliamentary elections, sparking a struggle for primacy with its rival, the Fatah movement led by Mahmoud Abbas, who remains president of the Palestinian Authority to this day. Fatah is much stronger in the West Bank, while Hamas is the main power in Gaza.

That June, Hamas militants cross a tunnel from Gaza and attack an Israeli military base, killing two Israeli soldiers and capturing service member Gilad Shalit. Israel invades Gaza.

June 2007

Hamas violently ousts Fatah forces from the Gaza Strip and solidifies its control of the territory. Israel and Egypt tighten their blockade of Gaza, which will devastate Gaza’s economy over the next decade. Two rival governments emerge: Hamas in Gaza and Abbas’ Palestinian Authority in the West Bank.

December 2008

In response to heavy rocket fire from Gaza, Israel launches a major three-week offensive. After a 22-day war that kills 1,200 Palestinians and 13 Israelis, the two sides announce a cease-fire.

March 2009

Benjamin Netanyahu, leader of the Likud party, becomes prime minister of Israel a second time. His long tenure eventually emboldens Israeli religious nationalists, accelerating settlement expansion and signaling opposition to a two-state solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

October 2011

Hamas releases Shalit, the Israeli soldier it captured in the 2006 raid. Israel releases the first group of what will be more than 1,000 freed Palestinian prisoners.

Also in 2011, Israel’s Iron Dome missile defense system becomes active and effectively blocks its first rocket from Gaza.

November 2012

Israel kills Hamas military chief Ahmed Jabari, sparking eight days of militant rocket fire from Gaza and an Israeli air campaign. Egyptian mediators secure a cease-fire after some 150 Palestinians and six Israelis are killed.

Israel’s Iron Dome missile defense system (left) intercepts rockets fired by Hamas from Gaza toward Israel early on May 16. Israel activated the system in 2011 and credits it with stopping many rockets, but some do get through.
Mohammed Abed/AFP via Getty Images
July-August 2014

Following the kidnapping and killing of three Israeli teenagers by Hamas members, Israel conducts a sweep against Hamas in the West Bank, prompting rocket attacks from Gaza and Israeli air raids. The seven-week conflict that ensues results in more than 2,200 Palestinian deaths in Gaza, more than half of them civilians. In Israel, 67 soldiers and six civilians are killed. Israel comes under heavy international criticism for its use of what the United Nations calls disproportionate force.

December 2017

President Donald Trump recognizes Israel’s claim to Jerusalem as its capital and directs the State Department to move the U.S. Embassy there. Palestinians seek part of Jerusalem for their capital. Hamas calls for a Palestinian uprising.

March 2018

Along the Gaza perimeter fence, Palestinian protesters, led by Hamas, stage massive demonstrations against the blockade of Gaza. Although mostly unarmed, many protesters burn tires, throw rocks and grenades at Israeli troops and damage the perimeter fence. Israeli troops kill more than 170 protesters over a period of several months. Israel says it is defending its border but is accused of using excessive force. Israel and Hamas engage in a number of rounds of intense but brief fighting during this time.

Palestinians run for cover from tear gas launched by Israeli security forces near the border between Israel and the Gaza Strip, east of Jabalia, on May 14, 2018, as Palestinians protest over the inauguration of the U.S. Embassy following its controversial move to Jerusalem.
Mohammed Abed/AFP via Getty Images
November 2018

Violence flares up after an Israeli undercover raid into Gaza kills seven Palestinian militants and a senior Israeli army officer, marking the most serious escalation since the war in 2014. Gaza militants fire hundreds of rockets at Israel, killing a Palestinian laborer in southern Israel. At least seven Palestinians, among them five militants, are killed in Gaza.

March 2021

The International Criminal Court opens an investigation into alleged crimes by Israelis and Palestinians since 2014.

May 2021

Hamas fires long-range rockets toward Jerusalem in support of Palestinian protests against Israel’s heavy-handed policing of the Al-Aqsa Mosque compound in Jerusalem and the threatened eviction of dozens of Palestinian families by Jewish settlers. Israel launches airstrikes on Gaza. The Israel Defense Forces say 3,750 rockets are fired from Gaza at Israel, 90% of them intercepted. Israel steps up its aerial assaults in densely populated Gaza, toppling high-rise buildings and killing 230 Palestinians, according to the Hamas-run Health Ministry. Israel says militants’ rockets kill 12 people in Israel. On May 20, the Israeli prime minister’s office announces a cease-fire.

The Beast of the Sea Adds His Insight on Iran: Revelation 13

George W. Bush: ‘Iranian influence’ is behind Hamas attacks on Israel


By Steven Nelson
Former President George W. Bush said in a new interview that Iran helped spur the Hamas terrorist group to attack Israel.

Bush told Fox News that what “you’re seeing playing out is Iranian influence targeted toward Israel.”

“I think the best approach with regard to Iran is to understand that their influence is dangerous for world peace,” he said.

The Republican former commander in chief said “they are very much involved with extremist movements in Lebanon and Syria and Yemen, and they are aiming to spread their influence.”

Hamas is a Palestinian offshoot of Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood, a Sunni Islamist movement that seeks to infuse religious fundamentalism into government. The US has condemned the group — which has controlled Gaza since 2007 — as a terrorist organization.

Although Iran opposed Sunni extremists in civil wars in Syria and Yemen, it allegedly supports the Palestinian group in fighting common enemy Israel.

The Lebanese Shiite group Hezbollah, which is closely linked to Iran, joined the current fighting by firing its own missiles at Israel this week.

Other Republicans, including Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) have speculated that Iran arms Hamas, which launched about 3,750 rockets over nine days from poverty-stricken Gaza toward Jerusalem and Tel Aviv.

McConnell said Iran backs Hamas and “keeps their rocket arsenals full.”

Hamas launched a barrage of missiles into Israel beginning last week after clashes in Jerusalem sparked by an Israeli court decision that ordered the eviction of Palestinian tenants who stopped paying rent in East Jerusalem.

Although Iran’s precise involvement in regional conflicts often is murky, the head of the Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps, Gen. Hossein Salami, said Wednesday that “Tehran backs the Palestinians’ fight against the Zionist regime.”

Salami boasted, “The Palestinians have emerged as a missile-equipped nation.”

Bush, who was president from 2001 to 2009, led the US invasion of Afghanistan in 2001 after 9/11 and ordered the US invasion of Iraq in 2003, making claims about weapons of mass destruction that turned out to be bogus.

Rockets fired by Hamas from Gaza City heading towards Israel on May 18, 20219.
Rockets fired by Hamas from Gaza City heading toward Israel on May 18, 2021.
Photo by MAHMUD HAMS/AFP via Getty Images
US military involvement in the Middle East later divided Republicans, with former President Donald Trump calling the invasion of Iraq one of the worst decisions in US history, in part because it allowed Iran’s influence to expand during a long-running insurgency against US troops.

Bush has rarely commented on political issues since leaving office, but told Foxnews.com that he’s concerned about efforts by the Biden administration to resurrect a nuclear deal with Iran that was brokered under former President Barack Obama. He said a new deal should be “comprehensive.”

“Any deal that is done has got to not only focus on its nuclear capabilities, but also its influence in the Middle East,” Bush said. “And you know, any deal, you’ve got to keep in mind the dangers of an aggressive Iran to our allies, and to stability, so it has to be a comprehensive look.”

Bush also offered support for the Abraham Accords negotiated by Trump’s son-in-law Jared Kushner. The accords resulted in the recognition of Israel by four Arab countries.

“Once the sit-in settles down, and if those Abraham Accords hold, it will make it easier to establish peace,” Bush said. “But right now, those who don’t want peace are provoking and attacking Israel, and Israel is, of course, responding for national security reasons.”

Hamas rocket attack kills two Thai workers outside the Temple Walls: Revelation 11

Hamas rocket attack kills two Thai workers in Israel.


May 19, 2021
The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

A Hamas rocket that hit an agricultural community in southern Israel on Tuesday killed two Thai workers.
A Hamas rocket that hit an agricultural community in southern Israel on Tuesday killed two Thai workers.Maya Alleruzzo/Associated Press
Foreign workers have long faced precarious living conditions in Israel, especially during military conflict. And on Tuesday, a Hamas rocket attack killed two Thai workers and wounded at least seven others in a packaging house in southern Israel, Thai and Israeli officials said.

Businesses near the border with Gaza are allowed to operate if they have access to a bomb shelter or a safety room, but a local official said the agricultural community where the Thai workers died did not have such a space.

That is often the case with such setups, an expert on foreign labor in Israel said.

“Thai workers come to Israel on temporary programs and live in caravans and containers that are often overcrowded and in poor sanitary conditions,” said Yahel Kurlander, a researcher at Tel-Hai College who specializes in Thai workers in Israel.

“These housings don’t have the safety rooms required by law or outlined in the contracts of these workers, who don’t have anywhere to hide,” she added.

Thais make up most of Israel’s agriculture work force, and tens of thousands live in the country as part of an agreement between the two nations. Investigations by news outlets and rights groups have highlighted their squalid living conditions, low pay and dangerous working situations including the spraying of chemicals.

The two workers killed on Tuesday were part of a group of 25 foreigners working at the plant and living in caravans nearby, according to Kan, the Israeli public broadcaster.

Thai workers usually do not speak Hebrew and English, Dr. Kurlander said, and “are among the most vulnerable populations in Israel.”

The workers’ deaths came a week after a Hamas strike killed an Indian woman who worked as a caregiver in Ashkelon. Previous Hamas rocket attacks killed a Thai agricultural worker in Israel in 2014 and injured another in 2018.

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said in a briefing on Wednesday that the recent deaths of the foreign workers were “one more manifestation of the fact that Hamas indiscriminately targets everyone.”

Israel has likewise been criticized for the killing of civilians in Gaza in military airstrikes. Those strikes in the past 10 days have killed over 200 Palestinians and wounded more than 1,500 others.