USGS Evidence Shows Power of the Sixth Seal (Revelation 6:12)

New Evidence Shows Power of East Coast Earthquakes
Virginia Earthquake Triggered Landslides at Great Distances
Released: 11/6/2012 8:30:00 AM USGS.govEarthquake shaking in the eastern United States can travel much farther and cause damage over larger areas than previously thought.U.S. Geological Survey scientists found that last year’s magnitude 5.8 earthquake in Virginia triggered landslides at distances four times farther—and over an area 20 times larger—than previous research has shown.“We used landslides as an example and direct physical evidence to see how far-reaching shaking from east coast earthquakes could be,” said Randall Jibson, USGS scientist and lead author of this study. “Not every earthquake will trigger landslides, but we can use landslide distributions to estimate characteristics of earthquake energy and how far regional ground shaking could occur.”“Scientists are confirming with empirical data what more than 50 million people in the eastern U.S. experienced firsthand: this was one powerful earthquake,” said USGS Director Marcia McNutt. “Calibrating the distance over which landslides occur may also help us reach back into the geologic record to look for evidence of past history of major earthquakes from the Virginia seismic zone.”This study will help inform earthquake hazard and risk assessments as well as emergency preparedness, whether for landslides or other earthquake effects.This study also supports existing research showing that although earthquakes  are less frequent in the East, their damaging effects can extend over a much larger area as compared to the western United States.The research is being presented today at the Geological Society of America conference, and will be published in the December 2012 issue of the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America.The USGS found that the farthest landslide from the 2011 Virginia earthquake was 245 km (150 miles) from the epicenter. This is by far the greatest landslide distance recorded from any other earthquake of similar magnitude. Previous studies of worldwide earthquakes indicated that landslides occurred no farther than 60 km (36 miles) from the epicenter of a magnitude 5.8 earthquake.“What makes this new study so unique is that it provides direct observational evidence from the largest earthquake to occur in more than 100 years in the eastern U.S,” said Jibson. “Now that we know more about the power of East Coast earthquakes, equations that predict ground shaking might need to be revised.”It is estimated that approximately one-third of the U.S. population could have felt last year’s earthquake in Virginia, more than any earthquake in U.S. history. About 148,000 people reported their ground-shaking experiences caused by the earthquake on the USGS “Did You Feel It?” website. Shaking reports came from southeastern Canada to Florida and as far west as Texas.In addition to the great landslide distances recorded, the landslides from the 2011 Virginia earthquake occurred in an area 20 times larger than expected from studies of worldwide earthquakes. Scientists plotted the landslide locations that were farthest out and then calculated the area enclosed by those landslides. The observed landslides from last year’s Virginia earthquake enclose an area of about 33,400 km2, while previous studies indicated an expected area of about 1,500 km2from an earthquake of similar magnitude.“The landslide distances from last year’s Virginia earthquake are remarkable compared to historical landslides across the world and represent the largest distance limit ever recorded,” said Edwin Harp, USGS scientist and co-author of this study. “There are limitations to our research, but the bottom line is that we now have a better understanding of the power of East Coast earthquakes and potential damage scenarios.”The difference between seismic shaking in the East versus the West is due in part to the geologic structure and rock properties that allow seismic waves to travel farther without weakening.Learn more about the 2011 central Virginia earthquake.

New Evidence Shows Power of East Coast Earthquakes
Virginia Earthquake Triggered Landslides at Great Distances
Released: 11/6/2012 8:30:00 AM USGS.govEarthquake shaking in the eastern United States can travel much farther and cause damage over larger areas than previously thought.U.S. Geological Survey scientists found that last year’s magnitude 5.8 earthquake in Virginia triggered landslides at distances four times farther—and over an area 20 times larger—than previous research has shown.“We used landslides as an example and direct physical evidence to see how far-reaching shaking from east coast earthquakes could be,” said Randall Jibson, USGS scientist and lead author of this study. “Not every earthquake will trigger landslides, but we can use landslide distributions to estimate characteristics of earthquake energy and how far regional ground shaking could occur.”“Scientists are confirming with empirical data what more than 50 million people in the eastern U.S. experienced firsthand: this was one powerful earthquake,” said USGS Director Marcia McNutt. “Calibrating the distance over which landslides occur may also help us reach back into the geologic record to look for evidence of past history of major earthquakes from the Virginia seismic zone.”This study will help inform earthquake hazard and risk assessments as well as emergency preparedness, whether for landslides or other earthquake effects.This study also supports existing research showing that although earthquakes  are less frequent in the East, their damaging effects can extend over a much larger area as compared to the western United States.The research is being presented today at the Geological Society of America conference, and will be published in the December 2012 issue of the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America.The USGS found that the farthest landslide from the 2011 Virginia earthquake was 245 km (150 miles) from the epicenter. This is by far the greatest landslide distance recorded from any other earthquake of similar magnitude. Previous studies of worldwide earthquakes indicated that landslides occurred no farther than 60 km (36 miles) from the epicenter of a magnitude 5.8 earthquake.“What makes this new study so unique is that it provides direct observational evidence from the largest earthquake to occur in more than 100 years in the eastern U.S,” said Jibson. “Now that we know more about the power of East Coast earthquakes, equations that predict ground shaking might need to be revised.”It is estimated that approximately one-third of the U.S. population could have felt last year’s earthquake in Virginia, more than any earthquake in U.S. history. About 148,000 people reported their ground-shaking experiences caused by the earthquake on the USGS “Did You Feel It?” website. Shaking reports came from southeastern Canada to Florida and as far west as Texas.In addition to the great landslide distances recorded, the landslides from the 2011 Virginia earthquake occurred in an area 20 times larger than expected from studies of worldwide earthquakes. Scientists plotted the landslide locations that were farthest out and then calculated the area enclosed by those landslides. The observed landslides from last year’s Virginia earthquake enclose an area of about 33,400 km2, while previous studies indicated an expected area of about 1,500 km2from an earthquake of similar magnitude.“The landslide distances from last year’s Virginia earthquake are remarkable compared to historical landslides across the world and represent the largest distance limit ever recorded,” said Edwin Harp, USGS scientist and co-author of this study. “There are limitations to our research, but the bottom line is that we now have a better understanding of the power of East Coast earthquakes and potential damage scenarios.”The difference between seismic shaking in the East versus the West is due in part to the geologic structure and rock properties that allow seismic waves to travel farther without weakening.Learn more about the 2011 central Virginia earthquake.

Maliki offers to reconcile with the Antichrist ahead of elections

Maliki offers to reconcile with Sadr ahead of elections

ERBIL, Kurdistan Region — Former Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki has offered reconciliation with influential Shiite cleric and political leader Muqtada al-Sadr, hinting about his hopes of returning to power again.

Speaking to al-Shariqyah TV on Thursday, Maliki said that he is ready to reconcile with Sadr.

“My hand is open to everyone who wants to reconcile with me. I do not want rivalries, and I do not want disputes to continue, neither with Muqtada al-Sadr nor with anyone else,” said the current leader of the State of Law coalition.

Sadr leads the Sairoon coalition, the largest bloc in the Iraqi parliament, which has recently began speaking explicitly about its desire to head the next government.

The Shiite cleric is Maliki’s most prominent opponent. Maliki also faces resistance from Iraq’s Shiite religious figures, led by Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani, who supported his removal from power in 2014.

Maliki confirmed that the Will movement, led by former MP Hanan al-Fatlaw, will ally with the State of Law in the upcoming elections, but he is “afraid” of international supervision on the upcoming elections.

Parliamentary elections in 2014 toppled Maliki after two successive terms in office. He has been widely criticized for his response to the rise of ISIS, and its occupation of Mosul.  

There is a history of disputes between Maliki and Sadr, the most recent of which took place in February. 

The bickering began with statements by Maliki, in which he said that he would not allow “the Batta [duck] to frighten people again.”

Batta is an Iraqi nickname for vehicles used by the Sadr-affiliated militia Mahdi Army to kidnap and murder people during sectarian violence in 2006 and 2007. 

A close associate of Sadr, Salih Muhammad al-Iraqi, responded, saying :”the Batta is the only solution to the corrupt, and to those who sold Iraq to ISIS,” referring to Maliki.

Iraq had initially planned to hold early elections on June 6. However, in January, Iraq’s council of ministers decided to postpone the elections to October 10.

Iran: nuclear talks intensify domestic power struggle

Iran: nuclear talks intensify domestic power struggle

Having survived Trump’s ‘maximum pressure’, hardliners seek to ram home their political advantage over reformist rivals

April 15, 2021

Ayatollah Ali Khamenei used to only wear the chequered keffiyeh scarf on special, mainly military, occasions: visits to war fronts with Iraq in the 1980s or army ceremonies. But since 2000, Iran’s supreme leader, the highest authority in the country for more than 30 years, has rarely been seen in public without it draped over his shoulders.

His adoption of the symbol of Palestinian nationalism — chaffiyeh in Persian — was triggered, says a relative, by the surprise 1997 victory of the reformist president Mohammad Khatami who swept to power promising political development at home and detente with the west. The scarf has subsequently become an outward symbol of resistance in Iranian minds — a resolute defence of Islamic ideology at home and abroad covering everything from its nuclear programme to regional and military policies and relations with the west.

Given the strain that Tehran has been under for the past three years, Ayatollah Khamenei could have been forgiven for wearing two keffiyeh at once. The country has weathered the most extensive sanctions in its history — costing the economy at least $200bn according to officials and hurting ordinary Iranians — as well as constant rhetoric around US military strikes.

But the regime — at least its hardline elements — have in many ways been emboldened by surviving the “maximum pressure” policy of Donald Trump’s administration without the system collapsing and millions of protesters pouring on to the streets in mass demonstrations.

In 2018 Trump withdrew the US from the nuclear deal — the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action — signed with world powers three years earlier to curb Tehran’s nuclear ambitions. Despite Iran’s compliance Washington accused it of violating “the spirit” of the agreement, through its regional and military policies. It imposed sanctions that fuelled Iranian suspicion that the US wanted regime change in Tehran.

There followed a series of tit-for-tat military attacks with Iran shooting down a US drone alleging that it crossed into its airspace. It also launched a missile strike on a US military base in Iraq last year in retaliation for the assassination of Qassem Soleimani, a senior Iranian Revolutionary Guards commander, by the US.

“He will keep wearing chaffiyeh as long as he thinks the Islamic republic is being threatened by radical reforms to show he will not compromise on principles,” says Ayatollah Khamenei’s relative. “And will not allow the US and Israel and reformists to push Iran back in the region, undermine the [ballistic] missile programme or question his absolute authority.”

President Hassan Rouhani surveys Iran’s new nuclear achievements in Tehran earlier this month © AP

No room for major compromise

Iran last week joined talks in Vienna with the other signatories of the nuclear agreement — the EU, Germany, France, the UK, Russia and China — on the future of the accord. It declined the chance to speak directly to the US. The chances of a lasting breakthrough, however, seem remote. An apparent cyber attack on Iran’s Natanz nuclear facility last Sunday and Tehran’s announcement this week that it plans to increase the purity of its enriched uranium have heightened suspicions on both sides.

Even before that Tehran’s message appeared clear: there is no room for major compromise with western states or pro-reform forces at home. The regime fears that any U-turn could be interpreted as a sign of weakness jeopardising the survival of the Islamic republic and the loyalty of proxy forces in Lebanon, Iraq, Syria, Yemen and Palestine.

Joe Biden’s entry to the White House has in some ways complicated matters. The US president and European states want to restart the nuclear accord as does Tehran which wants sanctions lifted. But the US wants to attach conditions to any final agreement: a curb on Iran’s ballistic missile programme and its expansionist regional policies.

“After our success in neutralising the US sanctions, Iran’s political position is much stronger than before,” says the relative of the leader. “The US is no longer in a position to set conditions.”

The spectre of direct contact with the US over the nuclear deal has intensified the power struggle in Tehran and further complicated Iran’s political scene ahead of presidential elections on June 18 which reformists fear will be dominated by hardliners and could see the lowest turnout in the country’s recent history. Such an outcome could limit the room for negotiation over the nuclear deal after the election.

The poll comes as the various factions — hardliners, reformists, Revolutionary Guards, judiciary — all jostle to influence any succession battle that would follow the death of the 81-year-old supreme leader.

“Our challenges with the US and Israel are eternal,” says a regime insider close to hardline forces. “The US is like a trailer truck which likes to go into a 4 sq m alley [Iran] and turn. This is possible only if the surrounding buildings [the republic] are destroyed. Why should we let the US into our alley?

“Trump did whatever he could including bringing down our oil exports to almost nothing but the Islamic republic did not collapse,” he adds. “No reformist can even dream of rolling back strategic policies. Relations with western states are not part of our security and economic doctrine. Even Europe is not attractive to us any more as they have no power.”

Representatives at the signing of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action in 2015, including Iran’s foreign minister Mohammad Javad Zarif © AFP via Getty Images

‘Addicted to sanctions’

Ayatollah Khamenei has made the path to reviving the nuclear deal clear to hardliners — mainly in the Revolutionary Guards, the judiciary and parliament — as well as pro-reform forces linked to the government of Hassan Rouhani.

He has said the country — which never officially left the nuclear accord — will fully comply with the treaty only if the Biden administration takes the first step and lifts all sanctions. Once satisfied, Iran would then roll back its nuclear advances since 2019 including uranium enrichment at higher volumes and purity and installation of more advanced centrifuges. He has also made it clear that there should be no discussions with western powers on non-nuclear issues.

Washington says it wants to strengthen the deal. But Antony Blinken, the US secretary of state, has also promised Congress he will look to curtail Iran’s missile programme and its support for regional militias as part of any extended agreement.

The US welcomed the Vienna talks as a positive step but officials have already expressed frustration. “[We] think it would be better if we could sit down with the Iranians,” a senior Biden administration official said after the first round of talks, adding that indirect negotiations “really makes it slower and more and more complicated”.

The US has yet to specify which of more than 1,500 sanctions the Trump administration imposed on Iran it would lift, but has said it would not remove all of them.

A street market in Tehran in 2019. Inflation in Iran has risen from 8.2 per cent in May 2018 to 48.7 per cent now © AFP via Getty Images

“The problem in the United States and it doesn’t matter which administration . . . is that the US is addicted to sanctions . . . to pressure . . . to bullying,” Mohammad Javad Zarif, Iran’s foreign minister who negotiated the nuclear deal told local media in February. “They do not have any leverage over Iran. They have made us rely on an oil-less economy, oil-free economy. Now our reliance on oil is below 20 per cent. That is a major gain.”

Zarif may be the best hope for the reformists if he stands in the June 18 poll. But first he would have to navigate the powerful institutions that often weed out candidates from the race long before election day. Hardliners fear a combination of a pro-reform government in Tehran and a Democratic administration in Washington — as it was in the final years of Barack Obama’s presidency — believing it could pave the way for future US intervention in Iran.

“A chance was given to the US once which will not be repeated,” says a hardliner. “It was our good luck that Trump was elected otherwise reformists would have been turned into giants by now.”

The reformist camp fears that a hardline government in Tehran would feed hawkish views in Washington, as well as regional powers like Israel and Saudi Arabia, which could potentially mean more economic pressure on Iran. “Hardliners say they can continue talks but how can they sit at the negotiating table with the US when their main value is strategic hostility toward the US?” asks a member of the reformist camp. “The world would not talk to them and sanctions will continue.”

Demonstrators burn a US flag in Tehran in 2019. The previous year, President Donald Trump pulled the US out of the nuclear deal © AFP via Getty Images

Rouhani — who has to step down after two terms in office — said in February that “the revolution’s principles . . . are fixed but approaches [to implement them] are not fixed” hinting at little room for manoeuvre if he is succeeded by a hardliner.

“Why are we scared of talking? We are powerful . . . and able to negotiate with the US,” the Iranian president said on Wednesday. “Don’t be scared of the Vienna talks . . . don’t worry that the talks could bear fruit early enough to create problems in the elections.”

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After being strengthened by the nuclear pact as his signature achievement, Rouhani promised Iranians that he would strike similar international deals in other fields. This was interpreted by hardliners as an attempt to persuade the supreme leader and the Revolutionary Guards to let him strike a grand bargain with the US. But the policies of Trump effectively torpedoed the Iranian president’s efforts.

Rouhani denies there was ever any grand plan but the mistrust between the hardline and reformists camps — always high — is much greater now making the June election critical after more than 20 years of reformists disrupting hardliners’ plans in national polls.

As a result the Revolutionary Guards — legally responsible to “safeguard” the Islamic system and “its achievements” — will have a stronger say ahead of this election and any future talks with the US. It has become the most organised and powerful institution under the Islamic republic due in large part to an economic empire that stretches into all aspects of the economy and a fearful intelligence service leading some to speculate that a military government could take power.

Iran launched a missile strike on a US military base in Iraq in January 2020 © AFP via Getty Images

But Saeed Hajjarian, who was once dubbed the “reformists’ brain”, told the Financial Times, in a written interview due to ill health, that the establishment of a military government under Ayatollah Khamenei was unlikely. “The guards’ role will weaken [in the long run] in particular considering that its power in the region is decreasing and the US is earnestly seeking to undermine the guards’ regional role.”

Hajjarian — who was shot in the head in a vigilante attack in 2000 — says that the reformist camp will not be silenced even if its politicians are pushed to the sidelines after the election. 

It is a view echoed by others: “Iranians will not let one group be the dominant force,” says one reformist. “The guards already have a strong presence everywhere and act like a government in shadow but it is not easy for them and hardliners to take over all the institutions.”

Turnout fears

The priority for the guards — and the other powerful factions — is to influence the transition of power once the supreme leader dies. The guards are mandated to ensure political divisions do not disrupt the process and that the country — about half of which is home to non-Persian ethnicities including separatists — does not fall under the control of the US.

Yet perhaps the biggest threat to all the factions is a low turnout at the June poll. Estimates suggest it could be as low as 40 per cent with a young educated population extensively using social media to express discontent over corruption, the state of the economy and the regime’s wider policies. Since 2009, there have been at least three major outbreaks of unrest across the country.

And while hardliners in the regime might have been emboldened by surviving sanctions, the economic reality for ordinary Iranians has been very different. Iran says sanctions have cost the country $200bn directly and much more indirectly. Inflation rose from 8.2 per cent in May 2018 to 48.7 per cent now, according to official figures, and the national currency has lost its value by four times since then. The IMF estimates that Iran’s gross official reserves declined from $122.5bn in 2018 to just $4bn in 2020, although this is disputed by the central bank. 

As a result, the number of Iranians experiencing extreme poverty has risen by five times to more than 20m people, economic analysts say. Meanwhile, tens of billions of dollars of the country’s revenues are frozen and beyond reach in overseas banks due to sanctions making the system unable to support businesses. The pandemic has compounded the situation claiming more than 65,000 lives — the highest in the Middle East.

Iranian women hold pictures of supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei and the late Iranian major-general Qassem Soleimani © Majid Asgaripour/Reuters

Economic hardships have demotivated voters. Many of those who voted for Rouhani in 2013 or 2017 are unwilling to even go to a polling station this year, politicians say.

“Even if [former reformist president] Khatami runs for president, I will not vote for him,” says Homeyra, a 50-year-old housewife who has voted in national polls since she was 16. “It makes no difference to us as they are all the same and we become poorer every day.”

Reformists hope that a deal with the US and any relaxation of sanctions over the next two months could help reverse that sentiment before the election. “The reformists’ main rival is not a hardline candidate for now,” says Mohammad Ali Abtahi, a former reformist vice-president. “It’s the low turnout. Even if the political system allows senior reformists to run, which is not yet clear, the main challenge remains.”

Analysts suspect Ayatollah Khamenei has concluded that an embarrassingly low turnout, anything below 50 per cent, would damage his regime’s credibility at home and Iran’s negotiators in any talks with the US. He has encouraged high turnout — even though that is likely to benefit a reformist candidate — and said not “one hour” should be wasted in the efforts to have sanctions lifted: a direct challenge to hardliners who had wanted to block any new agreement before polling day.

In a public speech in March with keffiyeh on his shoulders, he described the election as “an investment” for the future. He added that “the higher the turnout, the bigger the benefits” would be for the country as a whole in its efforts to “push away the enemy”.

Additional reporting by Katrina Manson in Washington

Israel strikes Hamas targets outside the Temple Walls: Revelation 11

Israel strikes Hamas targets after Gaza rocket fire

IDF says military aircraft hit sites linked to the Strip’s terrorist rulers, including an armaments production facility and a smuggling tunnel

By Alexander Fulbright and Judah Ari Gross

The Israeli military struck targets in the Gaza Strip early Friday, hours after Palestinian terrorists in the coastal enclave fired a rocket at southern Israel.

An Israel Defense Forces statement said fighter jets and other aircraft hit a number of sites linked to Hamas, the Islamist terror organization that rules Gaza. The targets included an armaments production facility, a tunnel for smuggling weaponry and a Hamas military post, according to the IDF.

“The attack was carried out as a response to the rocket fire from the Gaza Strip toward Israeli territory earlier this evening,” the statement said.

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The military did not specifically blame Hamas for Thursday evening’s rocket fire, but Israel has stressed it holds the terror group responsible for all violence emanating from Gaza.

The rocket, which was fired as Israel’s Independence Day came to an end, struck a field northeast of Gaza, causing neither injury nor damage.

The rocket attack triggered sirens in the town of Sderot and the nearby communities of Nir Am and Ibim.

The attack came amid a general lull in violence from the Gaza Strip in recent months, amid a ceasefire between Israel and Hamas.

Last month, a rocket was fired toward Beersheba as Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu made a campaign stop in the southern city ahead of the March 23 elections.

The China Nuclear Horn Expands Her Horn: Daniel 7

China To Conduct Most Rapid Expansion Of Nuclear Weapons & Delivery Mechanism Ever — US Report

April 15, 2021

China will continue its efforts to spread its influence, undercut that of the United States, drive wedges between Washington and its allies and partners, and foster new international norms that favor the authoritarian Chinese system, according to a US intelligence report.

It, however, adds that Chinese leaders will probably seek opportunities to reduce tensions with the US when such opportunities suit their interests.

The 2021 Annual Threat Assessment report was released by the US Office of the Director of National Intelligence on Tuesday.

The report, a copy of which has been reviewed by The EurAsian Times, said the China-India border tensions remain high, despite some force pullbacks this year. On the India-Pakistan issue, it says although a general war between India and Pakistan is unlikely, crises between the two are likely to become more intense, risking an escalatory cycle.

“Under the leadership of Prime Minister Narendra Modi, India is more likely than in the past to respond with military force to perceived or real Pakistani provocations, and heightened tensions raise the risk of conflict between the two nuclear-armed neighbors, with violent unrest in Kashmir or a militant attack in India being potential flashpoints,” it read

Referring to the India-China border row, the report said China’s occupation since May 2020 of contested border areas in eastern Ladakh is the most serious escalation in decades and led to a deadly clash between the two armies. India lost 20 of its soldiers, while China officially claimed only four casualties.

“As of mid-February, after multiple rounds of talks, both sides were pulling back forces and equipment from some sites along the disputed border,” it said.

In the South China Sea, Beijing will continue to intimidate littoral states and will use its military assets and maritime law enforcement platforms to send out a message to Southeast Asian countries that China has effective control over contested areas. “China is similarly pressuring Japan over contested areas in the East China Sea”.

Referring to the China-Taiwan tensions, the intelligence report says, the communist country will press Taiwan authorities to move toward unification and will condemn what it views as increased US-Taiwan engagement.

“We expect that friction will grow as Beijing steps up attempts to portray Taipei as internationally isolated and dependent on the mainland for economic prosperity, and as China continues to increase military activity around the island.”

Beijing will continue to promote its ambitious Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) to expand China’s economic, political, and military presence abroad. China will try to increase its influence using “vaccine diplomacy,” giving countries favored access to the COVID-19 vaccines it is developing.

China also will promote new international norms for technology and human rights, emphasizing state sovereignty and political stability over individual rights, the report highlighted.

Sounding an alarm over WMD (weapons of mass destruction), the intelligence assessment revealed that China will continue the most rapid expansion and platform diversification of its nuclear arsenal in its history, intending to at least double the size of its nuclear stockpile during the next decade and to field a nuclear triad.

“Beijing is not interested in arms control agreements that restrict its modernization plans and will not agree to substantive negotiations that lock in US or Russian nuclear advantages.”

In the cyber domain, China presents a “prolific and effective cyber-espionage threat”, it said. The report underlined that Beijing possesses substantial cyber-attack capabilities, and presents a growing influence threat.

“China’s cyber pursuits and proliferation of related technologies increase the threats of cyber attacks against the US homeland, suppression of US web content that Beijing views as threatening to its internal ideological control, and the expansion of technology-driven authoritarianism around the world.”

Iran Nukes Up: Daniel 8

Iran’s uranium level hits 60%

April 15, 2021

TEHRAN: Iran has informed the International Atomic Energy Agency of its plan to enrich uranium at 60-percent purity, the minimum fatal level, following the attack on its Natanz nuclear facility, Iranian news network Press TV reported, citing Deputy Foreign Minister Abbas Araqchi.

Iran will soon replace the centrifuges damaged in a recent act of sabotage at Natanz, Araqchi was quoted as saying.

The photo taken on April 9, 2007 shows a view of Natanz nuclear plant, about 300 km south of Tehran, Iran. XINHUA PHOTO

Also, Iran will install an additional 1,000 centrifuges with 50 percent higher enrichment capacity at the nuclear facility, said Araqchi, who leads the Iranian negotiating team in the Vienna talks with the representatives from Britain, China, France, Russia and Germany.

Besides, Behrouz Kamalvandi, the spokesman for the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI), said the preparations for producing 60-percent uranium enrichment will begin on Tuesday night at the Natanz enrichment site, semi-official FARS news agency reported.

The uranium at the purity of 60 percent is used in the production of radiopharmaceutical, Kamalvandi told FARS.

The Iranian Horn Attacks Israel:Daniel 8:4

Israel’s Mossad in Iraq attacked, a number of Israelis killed, wounded: Sources

Tuesday, 13 April 2021 11:07 PM  [ Last Update: Wednesday, 14 April 2021 10:10 AM ]

Israel’s Mossad spy agency has come under attack in Iraq, security sources say, with a number of Israeli forces killed or wounded in what was described as a “heavy blow” on the Zionist regime.

Iraq’s Sabereen News, citing security sources, reported late on Tuesday that a facility affiliated with Israel’s Mossad spy agency had been attacked by “unknown resistance forces” in the north of the country.

The Iraqi media said the attack resulted in the death and injury of a “number of Israeli forces,” dealing a “heavy blow” to the regime and its spy agency.

The sources fell short of providing details on the location of the attack and the extent of damage, however, Sabereen said, “Tomorrow, we’ll share some pictures of the operation.”

Reacting to the incident, a high-ranking Iraqi military commander said in an interview with Russian TV network RT that they had not so far received any news about the attack.

Media outlets in northern Iraq have yet to comment on the attack.

The incident came hours after an Israeli ship was attacked in the Emirati port of Fujairah, causing damage but no casualties.

Israeli ship comes under attack off UAE coast: Media reports

Media reports say an Israeli ship called the Hyperion affiliated with the regime’s PCC company has come under attack off the Emirati coast.

Israel’s Channel 12 quoted unnamed regime officials as blaming Iran for the ship attack.

The vessel, called the Hyperion and sailing under the Bahamas flag, was associated with the Israeli Ray Shipping company, the same company that owns a vessel hit by an explosion in the Sea of Oman in February.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu hastily accused at the time Iran of attacking the ship, with Iran categorically rejecting the charge.

Israeli media said the Tuesday’s attack on Hyperion was likely carried out with either a missile or a drone.

The attack followed an act of sabotage that targeted the electricity distribution network of Iran’s Shahid Mostafa Ahmadi Roshan nuclear facility in Natanz, which is a uranium enrichment center located in the city of the same name in Iran’s central province of Isfahan.

‘Natanz incident bold act of nuclear terrorism on Iranian soil’

Iran says the Sunday incident in Natanz which saw a nuclear facility lose electricity was “a bold act of nuclear terrorism on the Iranian soil”.

Iran’s Foreign Ministry spokesman Saeed Khatibzadeh told reporters on Monday that, “The appalling incident that took place in Natanz was the work of the Zionist regime (Israel), given what it was repeatedly saying before and what is still being heard from various sources these days.”

Iran said earlier this month that one of its merchant vessels has been targeted by an explosion of unknown origin in the strategic Red Sea, in the second such incident in less than a month.

The Foreign Ministry spokesman told reporters the Saviz ship was struck by the blast on April 5 near the coast of Djibouti, and sustained minor damage.

In a similar incident last month, an Iranian cargo ship was damaged after it was targeted by a terrorist attack en route to Europe in the Mediterranean Sea.

Press TV’s website can also be accessed at the following alternate addresses: