East Coast Still Unprepared For The Sixth Seal (Revelation 6:12)

East Coast Earthquake Preparedness
By By BEN NUCKOLS
Posted: 08/25/2011 8:43 am EDT
WASHINGTON — There were cracks in the Washington Monument and broken capstones at the National Cathedral. In the District of Columbia suburbs, some people stayed in shelters because of structural concerns at their apartment buildings.
A day after the East Coast’s strongest earthquake in 67 years, inspectors assessed the damage and found that most problems were minor. But the shaking raised questions about whether this part of the country, with its older architecture and inexperience with seismic activity, is prepared for a truly powerful quake.
The 5.8 magnitude quake felt from Georgia north to Canada prompted swift inspections of many structures Wednesday, including bridges and nuclear plants. An accurate damage estimate could take weeks, if not longer. And many people will not be covered by insurance.
In a small Virginia city near the epicenter, the entire downtown business district was closed. School was canceled for two weeks to give engineers time to check out cracks in several buildings.
At the 555-foot Washington Monument, inspectors found several cracks in the pyramidion – the section at the top of the obelisk where it begins narrowing to a point.
A 4-foot crack was discovered Tuesday during a visual inspection by helicopter. It cannot be seen from the ground. Late Wednesday, the National Park Service announced that structural engineers had found several additional cracks inside the top of the monument.
Carol Johnson, a park service spokeswoman, could not say how many cracks were found but said three or four of them were “significant.” Two structural engineering firms that specialize in assessing earthquake damage were being brought in to conduct a more thorough inspection on Thursday.
The monument, by far the tallest structure in the nation’s capital, was to remain closed indefinitely, and Johnson said the additional cracks mean repairs are likely to take longer. It has never been damaged by a natural disaster, including earthquakes in Virginia in 1897 and New York in 1944.
Tourists arrived at the monument Wednesday morning only to find out they couldn’t get near it. A temporary fence was erected in a wide circle about 120 feet from the flags that surround its base. Walkways were blocked by metal barriers manned by security guards.
“Is it really closed?” a man asked the clerk at the site’s bookstore.
“It’s really closed,” said the clerk, Erin Nolan. Advance tickets were available for purchase, but she cautioned against buying them because it’s not clear when the monument will open.
“This is pretty much all I’m going to be doing today,” Nolan said.
Tuesday’s quake was centered about 40 miles northwest of Richmond, 90 miles south of Washington and 3.7 miles underground. In the nearby town of Mineral, Va., Michael Leman knew his Main Street Plumbing & Electrical Supply business would need – at best – serious and expensive repairs.
At worst, it could be condemned. The facade had become detached from the rest of the building, and daylight was visible through a 4- to 6-inch gap that opened between the front wall and ceiling.
“We’re definitely going to open back up,” Leman said. “I’ve got people’s jobs to look out for.”
Leman said he is insured, but some property owners might not be so lucky.
The Insurance Information Institute said earthquakes are not covered under standard U.S. homeowners or business insurance policies, although supplemental coverage is usually available.
The institute says coverage for other damage that may result from earthquakes, such as fire and water damage from burst gas or water pipes, is provided by standard homeowners and business insurance policies in most states. Cars and other vehicles with comprehensive insurance would also be protected.
The U.S. Geological Survey classified the quake as Alert Level Orange, the second-most serious category on its four-level scale. Earthquakes in that range lead to estimated losses between $100 million and $1 billion.
In Culpeper, Va., about 35 miles from the epicenter, walls had buckled at the old sanctuary at St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, which was constructed in 1821 and drew worshippers including Confederate Gens. Robert E. Lee and J.E.B. Stuart. Heavy stone ornaments atop a pillar at the gate were shaken to the ground. A chimney from the old Culpeper Baptist Church built in 1894 also tumbled down.
At the Washington National Cathedral, spokesman Richard Weinberg said the building’s overall structure remains sound and damage was limited to “decorative elements.”
Massive stones atop three of the four spires on the building’s central tower broke off, crashing onto the roof. At least one of the spires is teetering badly, and cracks have appeared in some flying buttresses.
Repairs were expected to cost millions of dollars – an expense not covered by insurance.
“Every single portion of the exterior is carved by hand, so everything broken off is a piece of art,” Weinberg said. “It’s not just the labor, but the artistry of replicating what was once there.”
The building will remain closed as a precaution. Services to dedicate the memorial honoring Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. were moved.
Other major cities along the East Coast that felt the shaking tried to gauge the risk from another quake.
A few hours after briefly evacuating New York City Hall, Mayor Michael Bloomberg said the city’s newer buildings could withstand a more serious earthquake. But, he added, questions remain about the older buildings that are common in a metropolis founded hundreds of years ago.
“We think that the design standards of today are sufficient against any eventuality,” he said. But “there are questions always about some very old buildings. … Fortunately those tend to be low buildings, so there’s not great danger.”
An earthquake similar to the one in Virginia could do billions of dollars of damage if it were centered in New York, said Barbara Nadel, an architect who specializes in securing buildings against natural disasters and terrorism.
The city’s 49-page seismic code requires builders to prepare for significant shifting of the earth. High-rises must be built with certain kinds of bracing, and they must be able to safely sway at least somewhat to accommodate for wind and even shaking from the ground, Nadel said.
Buildings constructed in Boston in recent decades had to follow stringent codes comparable to anything in California, said Vernon Woodworth, an architect and faculty member at the Boston Architectural College. New construction on older structures also must meet tough standards to withstand severe tremors, he said.
It’s a different story with the city’s older buildings. The 18th- and 19th-century structures in Boston’s Back Bay, for instance, were often built on fill, which can liquefy in a strong quake, Woodworth said. Still, there just aren’t many strong quakes in New England.
The last time the Boston area saw a quake as powerful as the one that hit Virginia on Tuesday was in 1755, off Cape Ann, to the north. A repeat of that quake would likely cause deaths, Woodworth said. Still, the quakes are so infrequent that it’s difficult to weigh the risks versus the costs of enacting tougher building standards regionally, he said.
People in several of the affected states won’t have much time to reflect before confronting another potential emergency. Hurricane Irene is approaching the East Coast and could skirt the Mid-Atlantic region by the weekend and make landfall in New England after that.
In North Carolina, officials were inspecting an aging bridge that is a vital evacuation route for people escaping the coastal barrier islands as the storm approaches.
Speaking at an earthquake briefing Wednesday, Washington Mayor Vincent Gray inadvertently mixed up his disasters.
“Everyone knows, obviously, that we had a hurricane,” he said before realizing his mistake.
“Hurricane,” he repeated sheepishly as reporters and staffers burst into laughter. “I’m getting ahead of myself!”
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Associated Press writers Sam Hananel in Washington; Alex Dominguez in Baltimore; Bob Lewis in Mineral, Va.; Samantha Gross in New York City; and Jay Lindsay in Boston contributed to this report.

Israel Tries to Stop Hamas Election: Revelation 11

No elections without East Jerusalem say Palestinian factions as Israel arrests Hamas members

The New Arab Staff

Palestinains want Jerusalemites to participate [Getty]

Date of publication: 13 April, 2021

Palestinian political factions on Monday unanimously agreed that no elections will take place without Jerusalemites taking part.

Palestinian political factions on Monday unanimously agreed that no election will take place without East Jerusalem residents participating, amid concerns Israel might try to block voting in the occupied areas.

During a meeting held in Ramallah to discuss the upcoming general elections, the factions reiterated East Jerusalem’s Palestinian status and said Israel has no right to prevent Jerusalemites from voting in upcoming elections.

The parties also called on the international community – including the UN, EU, China, Russia – to urge Israel not to “put obstacles in the way of holding elections in all stages across the occupied territories, including East Jerusalem, the capital of the Palestinian state”, according to a statement on the Wafa news agency.

The statement urged all parties to encourage voting participation “as part of a comprehensive popular resistance across the pre-1967 occupied territories”.

It also called for Palestinian unity “for the sake of the electoral battle and all the legitimate national rights for freedom and independence in accordance with the laws and resolutions of international legitimacy”.

Prior to the 2006 Palestinian elections, Israeli officials tried to obstruct voting in East Jerusalem, which was illegally annexed by Israel in 1967 and is under Israeli civil and military control.

Unofficial estimates indicate that around 340,000 Palestinians live in occupied Jerusalem.

Meanwhile, Israeli forces arrested Hamas members across the occupied West Bank on Monday.

Hamas member Mustafa Shawer, Palestinian Legislative Council member Omar al-Qawasmi, and Anas Rasras were among those detained during the Monday raids, an anonymous source told Anadolu Agency.

Palestine will head to the polls for the first time in 15 years this summer. The legislative elections will take place on 22 May and a presidential vote on 31 July. 

It is currently unclear whether the votes will take place.

The Mighty Russian Nuclear Horn: Daniel 7

Russia To Remain ‘Largest, Most Capable’ WMD Rival To US – National Intelligence Director

Faizan Hashmi 1 minute ago Tue 13th April 2021 | 09:10 PM

The United States has concluded that Russia will remain the largest and most capable rival to the United States with respect to weapons of mass destruction (WMDs), the Annual Threat Assessment of the US Intelligence Community issued by the Director of National Intelligence (DNI) said on Tuesday

WASHINGTON (UrduPoint News / Sputnik – 13th April, 2021) The United States has concluded that Russia will remain the largest and most capable rival to the United Stateswith respect to weapons of mass destruction (WMDs), the Annual Threat Assessment of the US Intelligence Community issued by the Director of National Intelligence (DNI) said on Tuesday.

We assess that Russia will remain the largest and most capable WMD rival to the United States for the foreseeable future as it expands and modernizes its nuclearweapons capabilities and increases the capabilities of its strategic and nonstrategic weapons,” the report said.

The Iranian Nuclear Horn Defies the West: Daniel 8

Iran has begun 60% uranium enrichment – chief nuclear negotiator

Araqchi also announced that Iran will introduce 1,000 more centrifuges at the Natanz nuclear facility.

Iran announced that it will begin enriching uranium up to 60% at the Natanz nuclear facility attacked earlier this week, which would be an unprecedented level for the Islamic Republic, Iranian state media reported on Tuesday.

Fissile material must reach 90% purity to be used for a nuclear weapon. Under the 2015 nuclear deal, Iran was meant to enrich uranium to under 5%, until it expired in 2030.

Chief Iranian nuclear negotiator Abbas Araqchi also said Iran would install 1,000 more centrifuge machines in Natanz, the nuclear site whose regular and emergency electrical grids exploded on Sunday, in an act that Iran has called terrorism by Israel. Sources have confirmed that the Mossad was behind the explosion.

Before 2015 and since Iran began violating the nuclear deal in 2019, Iran enriched its stock to about 20%.

Even the jump to 20% set off alarms globally as taking a major additional step toward a nuclear weapon – especially since there is no viable civilian use for 20% enriched uranium.

But to date, Iran has not enriched uranium up to 60%, often referred to as the next level for jumping toward a nuclear weapon.

US President Joe Biden has called for Iran to return to compliance with the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, as the world powers’ 2015 nuclear agreement with Iran is called, in exchange for the US lifting sanctions placed on Iran in recent years and an American return to the JCPOA.

Indirect negotiations between Iran and the US were scheduled to continue in Vienna on Thursday, after a one-day postponement. Neither side commented on whether talks would continue nor did the State Department comment on the matter at all by press time.

However, the US National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan “reaffirmed the Biden-Harris administration’s unwavering commitment to Israel’s security and to ensuring Iran will never obtain a nuclear weapon,” in a virtual meeting with his Israeli counterpart Meir Ben-Shabbat on Tuesday. This was their second strategic consultation, and they said they would continue an open dialogue in the months ahead. Sullivan invited Ben-Shabbat to visit Washington later this month.

Russia’s Ambassador in Vienna Mikhail Ulyanov, who is involved in the nuclear talks, tweeted that on Thursday, “no doubt that in addition to previous issues the Commission will address the latest steps of Iran in the nuclear field, including 60% enrichment.”

The European parties to the Iran deal – the UK, France and Germany – have spoken out against Iran’s recent increase of enrichment to 20% and its development of uranium metal, pointing out that they have no credible civilian use, but not immediately.

An Israeli official said that enrichment to 60% is “breaking a threshold where it’s very clear what they’re doing and obviously this is well on the way for a weapons-grade material.”

The official explained that this highlights the core problem with the JCPOA, that it allows Iran to maintain “the infrastructure in place that allows it to do this. It’s only a matter of a political decision.”

Sources told The Jerusalem Post that Iran’s threat may be more of a boast as they may not really yet have achieved the capability of enriching uranium at the 60% level. Even if they might have had the capability a few days ago, Sunday’s wiping out of the Natanz power grid might also make the statement more of a future than a present threat.

Still, even a public commitment to enrich at that level would be unprecedented for Iran and could show its seriousness to move closer to the nuclear threshold.

It was unclear exactly how Tehran would increase the number of centrifuges it operates at Natanz after reports that enrichment at the facility could be set back nine months. However, the Islamic Republic has other nuclear facilities, like Fordow.

The Threat of the First Nuclear War: Revelation 8:1

Pak, India situation in Kashmir remains threat to international peace, security

Ambassador Akram speaks at US Army War College | Says terrorism in Pakistan being sponsored by India from ungoverned spaces in Afghanistan

Agencies

April 12, 2021

NEW YORK – A top Pakistani diplomat has expressed the hope that the United Nations under the new Biden administration will revive its active engagement at the United Nations to enable the world community to effectively respond to global challenges such as the coronavirus pandemic, climate change, terrorism and promoting Sustainable Development goals (SDGs).

“Everyone at the UN is very happy that America is back, and the new U.S. administration has committed itself to participating actively in the UN, reviving multilateralism, and working with other member states to promote the goals and objectives of the UN Charter,” Munir Akram, Pakistan permanent representative to the UN, said in a virtual seminar organised by US Army War College.

Pakistan, he said, looked forward to cooperating with the United States at the UN on all key issues.

Based in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, the US Army War College educates and develops leaders for service at the strategic level while advancing knowledge in the global application of landpower.

Russia warns US to stay away from Black Sea

Ambassador Akram told the army officers participating in the seminar that the U.S. move, over the last four years, to disengage itself from the UN had contributed to the diminution in the importance of the world body. In his presentation, the Pakistani envoy explained the key features and functions of the United Nations and its affiliated organs in the maintenance of international peace and security, as well as Pakistan’s active role at the UN, especially in the peace-keeping operations.

Islamabad looks forward to cooperate with US at UN in meeting global challenges

The United Nations, he said, has always been an important body for Pakistan because its dispute with India over Jammu and Kashmir was referred to the Security Council in 1947.

The 15-member Council pronounced itself on the dispute, calling for a plebiscite, under the UN auspices, to enable the people of Jammu and Kashmir to determine their own future, and to decide whether they wish to join Pakistan or India, it was pointed out.

Govt to ensure uninterrupted power supply during Sehar, Iftar

United Nations Military Observer Group in India and Pakistan (UNMOGIP) has been stationed since 1948 to monitor the ceasefire between the two countries. Pakistan has contributed over 200,000 peacekeepers in over 46 UN peacekeeping missions, and promoted actively the role of the UN peacekeeping for the preservation of international peace and security.

At the present moment, Ambassador Akram said Pakistan has a stake in a number of current issues that are before the United Nations.

He said Kashmir became a focus of attention when India abrogated its autonomy in 2019 and divided the occupied region into two parts, prompting Pakistan to raise its voice against these illegal measures.

“The situation between India and Pakistan in Kashmir remains a threat to international peace and security,” the Pakistani envoy said. After a large number of ceasefire violations by India along the Line of Control in the disputed Kashmir region, he said guns have fallen silent and hoped that they would remain silent.

Met Dept issues heavy rainfall, thunderstorm alerts in Sindh

On Afghanistan, he said, Pakistan had facilitated an agreement between the United States and the Taliban for an orderly and responsible withdrawal from Afghanistan, and for negotiations between the Afghan parties to achieve a political settlement. On terrorism, he said, Pakistan had collaborated with the United States to destroy al Qaeda and related terrorist organizations, and suffered over 80,000 casualties in this ‘war on terrorism.’

Pakistan had succeeded after major military operations to clear its frontier territories of terrorist organizations. “However,’ he said, “We continue to face the problem of terrorism today, which is externally sponsored by our neighbour, India, from the ungoverned spaces in Afghanistan,” adding that this issue has been raised in the Security Council.

On disarmament, Pakistan has been a reluctant nuclear weapons state, as India went ahead with its nuclear explosions and “we were obliged to follow suit”. Pakistan, he said, has adhered to the principles of nuclear non-proliferation and sought mutual restraint regime with India to control arms race between the two countries. “We have, as yet, not found a reciprocal positive response from our neighbour.”

Ramadan moon sighted, Pak Muslims to observe first fast tomorrow

Iran atomic sites targeted by the West

EXPLAINER: Iran atomic sites targeted by diplomacy, sabotage

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — Iran’s nuclear program has been targeted by diplomatic efforts and sabotage attacks over the last decade, with the latest incident striking its underground Natanz facility.

The attack Sunday at Natanz comes as world powers try to negotiate a return by Iran and the U.S. to Tehran’s atomic accord. The sabotage threatens to upend those negotiations and further heighten regional tensions across the Mideast.

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FROM ‘ATOMS FOR PEACE’ TO PROLIFERATION

Iran’s nuclear program actually began with the help of the United States. Under its “Atoms for Peace” program, America supplied a test reactor that came online in Tehran in 1967 under the rule of Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi. That help ended once Iran’s 1979 Islamic Revolution overthrew the shah.

In the 1990s, Iran expanded its program, including secretly buying equipment from Pakistan’s top nuclear scientist Abdul Qadeer Khan. Khan helped create Pakistan’s nuclear weapons program and his proliferation aided North Korea in obtaining the atomic bombs it has today. Khan’s designs allowed Iran to build the IR-1 centrifuges that largely power its uranium enrichment.

Tehran insists its atomic program is peaceful. However, Iran “carried out activities relevant to the development of a nuclear explosive device” in a “structured program” through the end of 2003, the International Atomic Energy Agency has said. That’s an assessment shared by U.S. intelligence agencies and the State Department. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu long has alleged Iran continues to want nuclear weapons to this day.

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IRAN’S NUCLEAR SITES

Natanz, in Iran’s central Isfahan province, hosts the country’s main uranium enrichment facility. Iran has one operating nuclear power plant in Bushehr, which it opened with Russia’s help in 2011. Iran previously reconfigured its Arak heavy-water reactor so it couldn’t produce plutonium. Its Fordo enrichment site is also dug deep into a mountainside. Tehran also still operates the Tehran research reactor.

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DIPLOMACY TO DISARRAY

Iran struck the nuclear deal in 2015 with the United States, France, Germany, the United Kingdom, Russia and China. The deal, formally known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, saw Iran dramatically limit its enrichment of uranium under the watch of IAEA inspectors in exchange for the lifting of economic sanctions. The small stockpile of less-enriched uranium blocked Iran from having enough material to build a nuclear bomb if it chose.

Then-President Donald Trump unilaterally withdrew America from the accord in 2018, in part over the deal not addressing Iran’s ballistic missile program and its support of allied militant groups in the Mideast. Architects of the deal, containing provisions that expire over time, had said they hoped American officials could build on it for future agreements.

Since the U.S. withdrawal, Iran has in response abandoned all the deal’s limits of its uranium enrichment. It spins advanced centrifuges, grows its stockpile and enriches up to 20% purity — a technical step away from weapons-grade levels of 90%.

President Joe Biden, who took office in January, has said he’s willing to re-enter the nuclear deal. Countries began negotiations in Vienna last week seeking to find a way forward. Israel, which under Netanyahu has vowed not to see the deal revived, is widely suspected of recently stepping up a shadow campaign targeting Iran.

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NUCLEAR TERRORISM

With the sabotage of Natanz on Sunday, the head of Iran’s civilian nuclear program described it as “nuclear terrorism.” But it marked merely the latest attack targeting the Iranian program.

Natanz found itself first targeted by a major cyberattack in the late 2000s. Called Stuxnet, the virus attacked control units for centrifuges at Natanz, causing the sensitive devices to spin out of control and destroy themselves. Experts widely attribute the attack to America and Israel, as does Iran.

Another sabotage attack targeted Natanz in July. An explosion ripped apart an advanced centrifuge assembly plant at the site. Afterward, Iran said it would rebuild the site deep inside a nearby mountain. Satellite photos show that work continues. Suspicion widely fell on Israel for the blast as well.

Then there have been a series of assassinations targeting Iranian nuclear scientists over the last decade. The killings involved bombings and shootings. The most-recent killing saw the scientist who founded Iran’s military nuclear program decades ago shot in November by what authorities have described as a remote-controlled machine gun that later exploded. Iran blames Israel for those slayings as well.

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SINGING AMONG THE CENTRIFUGES

The extent of the damage to Natanz remains unclear at the moment. Iran has yet to broadcast any images of the facility on state television, though an official said first-generation centrifuges had been damaged. It’s unclear if any of the damage will be able to be seen from the air as its centrifuge halls are all underground. NASA fire satellites detected no visible blasts at the facility either Saturday or Sunday.

The longterm effects on Iran’s atomic program as a whole also remain unclear. If the attack halts centrifuges at Natanz, they still spin at Fordo. Ali Akbar Salehi, the head of the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran, vowed Sunday to keep advancing the country’s nuclear technology.

The sabotage comes at a sensitive time for outgoing President Hassan Rouhani, whose administration is trying to claw back its signature diplomatic achievement through the Vienna talks. Term-limited from seeking office again, the relative-moderate Rouhani will bow out to whoever wins Iran’s upcoming June presidential election.

If Iran can’t regain the benefits of the deal, it could boost hard-liners within the Islamic Republic. Already, some media outlets demanded Monday for Rouhani to pull out of the Vienna negotiations.

The Natanz sabotage also further links Iran’s nuclear program to the propaganda aired by state television urging the country to resist outside pressure. Before the sabotage, state TV aired a segment showing men in white lab coats singing among Natanz’s silver centrifuges, some holding pictures of the scientists slain in the earlier assassinations.

“We are proud and victorious in science,” the men sang. “We believe in ourselves and don’t pin hopes to foreigners.”

The singers likely weren’t nuclear scientists, however. Iran since the killing has carefully blurred their images, worried about them being targeted again.

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Follow Jon Gambrell on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/jongambrellAP.

Alarm over Pakistan nuclear programme: Daniel 8

Norway raises alarm over Pakistan nuclear programme

Oslo [Norway], April 12 (ANI): Norway on Monday raised alarm over unhindered exploitation of dual use technology by Pakistan to aid its nuclear programme.

According to a threat assessment report by the Norwegian security agencies, Pakistan’s practice of bypassing all international safeguards in gaining latest nuclear technology on the pretext of using it for education and health is posing greatest threat to them, reported moderndiplomacy.

Fabien Baussart, in an article in moderndiplomacy wrote that Norway became the latest country to raise alarm over unhindered exploitation of dual use technology by Pakistan.

Norway is not the only country to realise the immense risk stemming from transferring critical technologies to Pakistan. Its assessment follows several other countries’ public acknowledgement of the nuclear threat posed by Pakistan.

German authorities disclosed in 2020 that Pakistan had sought technology for weapons of mass destruction (WMD) “in order to retain a serious deterrent potential against ‘arch enemy’ India”. The agency provided a detailed account of Pakistan’s efforts to steal information and material about nuclear weapons.

Czech Republic in its report titled “Annual Report of the Security Information Service for 2019” also drew global attention towards Pakistan misleading the world in procuring internationally controlled items and technologies to aid its nuclear programme.

In 2019, the US Department of Justice indicted five persons associated with a Pakistan based front company for operating a network that exported US origin goods to Pakistan.

The network used to conceal the true destinations of the goods in Pakistan by showing front companies as the supposed purchasers and end users, reported Baussart.

US Justice Department statement disclosed that the goods were ultimately exported to Pakistan’s Advanced Engineering Research Organization (AERO) and the Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission (PAEC) without export licenses.

Both AERO and PAEC are on the US Commerce Department’s Entity List, which imposes export license requirements for organisations whose activities are found to be contrary to US national security or foreign policy interests.

Moreover, to fulfill its destructive agenda, Pakistan does not shy away from using the name of its poor public and students. Its government has repeatedly claimed that it seeks the dual use technologies for social and economic upliftment of the country by utilising the technology in its health and education sectors, reported moderndiplomacy.

Several instances of Pakistan having gained access to dual technology in the garb of peaceful purposes have come to light in the recent years. And the risk continues considering Pakistan’s terror background and its history of stealing technologies from different parts of the world.

Given the poor governance standards and history of failure of civil institutions in Pakistan, these observations provide a justification for apprehensions of the western countries about its nuclear programme.

It remains to be seen whether these disclosures lead to sanctions or new export controls against Pakistan or the country again succeeds in misleading the world by playing victim’s card, wrote Baussart. (ANI)