History Expects the Sixth Seal in NYC (Revelation 6:12)

According to the New York Daily News, Lynn Skyes, lead author of a recent study by seismologists at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory adds that a magnitude-6 quake hits the area about every 670 years, and magnitude-7 every 3,400 years.

A 5.2-magnitude quake shook New York City in 1737 and another of the same severity hit in 1884.

Tremors were felt from Maine to Virginia.

There are several fault lines in the metro area, including one along Manhattan’s 125th St. – which may have generated two small tremors in 1981 and may have been the source of the major 1737 earthquake, says Armbruster.

“The problem here comes from many subtle faults,” explained Skyes after the study was published.

He adds: “We now see there is earthquake activity on them. Each one is small, but when you add them up, they are probably more dangerous than we thought.”

Armbruster says a 5.0-magnitude earthquake today likely would result in casualties and hundreds of millions of dollars in damage.

“I would expect some people to be killed,” he notes.

The scope and scale of damage would multiply exponentially with each additional tick on the Richter scale. (ANI)

Palestinians Blinded Outside the Temple Walls (Revelation 11)

‘Eye of Truth’ – Portraits of Palestinians Blinded by Israeli Snipers

Published June 22nd, 2020 – 07:09 GMT

There is smoke from burning tires, gas, and moving crowds. Snipers are at a distance.

Some were taking part in clashes, others were simply in the wrong place at the wrong time. Some of them wish to be dead, it would be easier. Others want to challenge the whole world, to remain strong, but inside they are broken.

Along the border of the Gaza Strip, the Israeli army uses snipers who, according to instructions, open fire only when the soldiers are at risk from intensifying violence from Palestinian rioters.

In the Gaza Strip, the cramped territory of two million people controlled by Hamas and under Israeli blockade, residents have grown accustomed to traumatic wounds after the three Israeli aggressions in 2008, 2012 and 2014.

There residents complain of increasing violence from the Israeli police, which says it is responding to growing unrest by the population.

In recent years police, there have used spongy synthetic rubber bullets, deemed in theory to be less lethal. But when fired at close range, they have been known to cause deaths.

More than 8,000 Palestinians were hit by Israeli fire during the often violent “March of Return” protests which began in March 2018, according to UN figures.

This combination of pictures created on June 8, 2020, shows (top L to R) Ahmed al-Louth, who lost his left eye, posing during a photo session in Bureij refugee camp in central Gaza; Muath Amarneh, who lost his left eye, posing during a photo session in Ramallah; Mohammed Burqan, who lost his right eye, posing during a photo session in Jerusalem; (middle L to R) Jacqueline Shahada, who lost her left eye, posing during a photo session in Bureij refugee camp in central Gaza; Malek Issa, 9, lost his left eye

Sami Marsan, who lost his left eye in the ongoing conflict with Israel, poses during a photo session in Bureij refugee camp in central Gaza, on February 4 , 2020. Along the border of the Gaza Strip, the Israeli army uses snipers who, according to instructions, open fire only when the soldiers are at risk from intensifying violence from Palestinian rioters. Some were taking part in clashes, others simply in the wrong place at the wrong time. All were left scarred and their lives wrecked, even though in Palestinian society being injured while standing up to Israeli occupation is often lionised. Emmanuel DUNAND / AFP

Mai Abu Rawda, who lost her right eye, stands at the place where she was shot in Bureij refugee camp in central Gaza, on May 28 , 2020. Along the border of the Gaza Strip, the Israeli army uses snipers who, according to instructions, open fire only when the soldiers are at risk from intensifying violence from Palestinian rioters. Some were taking part in clashes, others simply in the wrong place at the wrong time. All were left scarred and their lives wrecked, even though in Palestinian society being injured while standing up to Israeli occupation is often lionised. Mahmud Hams / AFP

Ahmed al-Louth, who lost his left eye in the ongoing conflict with Israel, poses during a photo session in Bureij refugee camp in central Gaza, on February 4 , 2020. Along the border of the Gaza Strip, the Israeli army uses snipers who, according to instructions, open fire only when the soldiers are at risk from intensifying violence from Palestinian rioters. Some were taking part in clashes, others simply in the wrong place at the wrong time. All were left scarred and their lives wrecked, even though in Palestinian society being injured while standing up to Israeli occupation is often lionised. EMMANUEL DUNAND / AFP

Ahmed al-Louth, who lost his left eye in the ongoing conflict with Israel, poses during a photo session in Bureij refugee camp in central Gaza, on February 4 , 2020. Along the border of the Gaza Strip, the Israeli army uses snipers who, according to instructions, open fire only when the soldiers are at risk from intensifying violence from Palestinian rioters. Some were taking part in clashes, others simply in the wrong place at the wrong time. All were left scarred and their lives wrecked, even though in Palestinian society being injured while standing up to Israeli occupation is often lionised. EMMANUEL DUNAND / AFP

Jacqueline Shahada, who lost her left eye in the ongoing conflict with Israel, poses during a photo session in Bureij refugee camp in central Gaza on February 4, 2020. Along the border of the Gaza Strip, the Israeli army uses snipers who, according to instructions, open fire only when the soldiers are at risk from intensifying violence from Palestinian rioters. Some were taking part in clashes, others simply in the wrong place at the wrong time. All were left scarred and their lives wrecked, even though in Palestinian society being injured while standing up to Israeli occupation is often lionised. Emmanuel DUNAND / AFP

This combination of pictures created on June 11, 2020 shows (Top L to R) Mohammed Burqan, who lost his left eye, posing during a photo session in Jerusalem; Muath Amarneh, who lost his left eye, posing during a photo session in Ramallah; Jacqueline Shahada, who lost her left eye, posing during a photo session in Bureij refugee camp in central Gaza; (Middle L to R) Ahmed al-Louth, who lost his left eye, posing during a photo session in Bureij refugee camp in central Gaza; Malek Issa, 9, who lost his left eye, poses during a photo session in Jerusalem; Nafez al-Damiri, who lost his right eye, poses during a photo session in Jerusalem; (Bottom L to R) Rifaat Barham, who lost his right eye, posing during a photo session in Ramallah, Mai Abu Rawda, who lost her right eye, posing during a photo session in Bureij refugee camp in central Gaza; Sami Marsan, who lost his left eye, posing during a photo session in Bureij refugee camp in central Gaza. Along the border of the Gaza Strip, the Israeli army uses snipers who,

WW3 Fears in Southern Asia

WW3 fears grow as China warns it’s ‘not afraid’ to fight India and threatens 1,000s of deaths

CHINA has warned it is “not afraid” to go to war with India as the tense faceoff between the two nuclear powers threatens to boil over into a full-scale conflict. 

Beijing made the threats in its state controlled media, claiming New Delhi would be “more humiliated than 1962”, referring to a short but vicious battle that saw more than 2000 killed. 

India has scrambled fighter and spy planes for combat patrols and dispatched military reinforcements after a bloody clash erupted in the Galwan Valley, part of the disputed Ladakh region along the Himalayan frontier last week. 

The fierce battle saw 500 soldiers engulfed in hand-to-hand combat — some using spiked clubs — in a gruesome clash that left at least 20 Indian and 40 Chinese soldiers dead.

But the Chinese Communist regime warned India that any future conflict would spell defeat for them like the 1962 war.

An article in the state mouthpiece, the Global Times, read: “Chinese military observers said that an escalated, large-scale military conflict involving main Chinese troops, if that were to happen, would mean a rout just like the war in 1962, with very disproportionate casualty figures unfavourable to India.

 “In a potential self-defence counter-attack, China will secure its own territory and not likely claim Indian territory after emerging victorious, but the battle will deeply hurt India so much that global position and economy would go backwards to decades ago.”

India blames China for instigating the fight by developing military infrastructure in the valley, which it said was a breach of the agreement of what area remained in dispute.

In a development that has escalated the war threat, satellite images appear to show China carrying out a blatant land grab by diverting the Galwan river to claim more territory in the hotly contested region.

Pictures indicate that China is claiming the Galwan river’s sides up to 25 miles from The Line of Actual Control (LAC) – which separates Indian-controlled territory from Chinese-controlled territory.

Chinese engineers are reportedly altering the river’s course and reducing its width to allow soldiers to be deployed on the larger land mass.

This would significantly beef up its ability to project military power in the area and is a tactic that echoes Beijing’s construction of island staging posts in the disputed South China Sea which it claims its own

Yet, while China harks back to the 1962 Indian “rout”, experts fear the conflict could develop into something akin to World War Three.

Professor Joseph M. Siracusa, from the School of Global, Urban and Social Studies, told news.com.au: “In 1962, all these people were going at each other, but they didn‘t have nuclear weapons. 

“Today, all the players in South Asia have nuclear weapons.

“In exchange of 10 or 15 missiles there are warheads, which would induce the ‘nuclear winter’ that Carl Sagan predicted in the 1980s. There could be all kinds of hell to pay for that.”

“Will they use nuclear weapons for a border dispute? Not because they want to, but because it might escalate or accidentally move into that area.”

China has laid claim to the entire Galwan Valley, saying the whole area is located on their side of the LAC.

Foreign ministry spokesman Zhao Lijian said: “Right and wrong is very clear and the responsibility entirely lies with the Indian side.”

Meanwhile India has dismissed China’s claim over the valley as “exaggerated” and “untenable”.

Previous agreements between the two sides mean no guns are taken close to the border by each side which suggests why spiked clubs were used in last week’s battle. 

An Indian airforce warplane soars overheadCredit: Getty Images – Getty

An image of the spiked weapons allegedly used in the battle

Palestinians to Thwart Jewish Annexation Outside the Temple Walls (Revelation 11)

Palestinians Capable of Thwarting Israel’s Annexation Plan: Hamas

We Palestinians are fairly capable of thwarting the annexation plan. This requires national consensus, besides a struggle plan that covers all fields and arenas. We in Hamas work to implement such a vision, and communicate with everyone to achieve this goal,” member of Hamas political bureau Husam Badran wrote in a series of posts published on his official Twitter page on Saturday.

He warned, “The annexation project is not a symbolic issue or a formal matter. It is rather a quantum leap in the Occupation’s (Israel’s) list of criminal acts. It will negatively affect the political, economic, social, legal and moral aspects of the Palestinian nation. Therefore, all options are on the table to confront and frustrate the plan.”

Badran said the Tel Aviv regime’s impending move “targets all components of the Palestinian nation, regardless of their political affiliations, intellectual backgrounds, or geographical origins. It is practically a threat to all of us. This necessitates making joint efforts to confront it, and avoiding internal disputes.”

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, who was sworn into office for another term on May 17, has set July 1 for the start of cabinet discussions on extending “sovereignty” over settlements in the West Bank and the Jordan Valley.

In response to Israel’s decision, Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas declared the end of all agreements signed with Israel and the United States on May 19.

On Friday, Hamas vowed that Palestinian resistance factions will respond to the Israeli regime’s annexation plan as well as US President Donald Trump’s controversial proposal for “peace” between the Israeli regime and Palestinians, dubbed “the deal of the century.”

The deal of the century envisions Jerusalem al-Quds as “Israel’s undivided capital” and allows the Tel Aviv regime to annex settlements in the occupied West Bank and the Jordan Valley. The plan also denies Palestinian refugees the right of return to their homeland, among other controversial terms.

Trump’s plan has triggered waves of protest rallies around the globe.

“Our people are facing a historical juncture and a new chapter in conspiracies targeting their cause through land theft, Judaization of al-Quds and annexation of the West Bank. All Zionist attempts are meant to liquidate our cause,” senior Hamas official Mushir al-Masri said at a massive popular rally in the northern part of Gaza Strip.

He added that the Israeli regime has exploited Arabs’ inaction and global preoccupation with the coronavirus pandemic to implement the so-called deal of the century, declare Jerusalem al-Quds its capital and work towards annexation of large parts of the occupied West Bank.

Palestinian people and resistance groups, Hamas in particular, will not allow Israel to carry out its annexation project, Masri pointed out, Press TV reported.

“The message to the enemy is that we (Palestinians) will confront it even if the campaign costs us our blood and our children. It should realize that it (the regime) is heading toward its demise” he concluded.

Trump Hits Oklahoma Before the Earthquake

Earthquake hits Oklahoma after Trump rally

FOX 5 NY1 day ago

A moderate earthquake hit Oklahoma in an area west of Tulsa a short time after President Trump held a campaign rally in the city.  The quake hit about 10:15 p.m. local time.

The magnitude 4.5 quake was centered near Perry, Oklahoma, which is about 80 miles west of Tulsa and is north of Oklahoma City.  The quake was felt across the north-central part of the state and even in Kansas.

Hundreds of people including some in Tulsa reported to the USGS that they felt shaking from the earthquake.  Protests were still going on in the streets of the city at the time of the quake.

No damage or injuries were immediately reported.

On Saturday night President Trump held his first campaign rally since the coronavirus hit the United States.  It ended before the earthquake hit the state.

It was the largest recorded earthquake in Oklahoma since a magnitude 4.4 quake in May 2019.

Thousands of earthquakes have been recorded in Oklahoma in recent years, with many linked to the underground injection of wastewater from oil and gas production. Regulators have directed producers to close some injection wells

Iran Nearly Ready to Test a Nuke

Iran could test a nuclear weapon in the desert within a year

June 22, 2020

Mathew Petti

A new International Atomic Energy Agency report reveals that Iran has doubled its stockpile of enriched uranium since February, but experts disagree on how quickly the country could build a nuclear bomb if it wanted to.

Iran had agreed to limit its nuclear program under the JCPOA, a 2015 deal with six world powers. U.S. President Donald Trump declared the agreement the “worst deal ever” and pulled out of it in 2018, prompting Iran to begin stockpiling nuclear materials that could eventually be used to make a weapon.

But it is difficult to tell how much closer Iran is to actually building a bomb.

Iran could test a nuclear weapon in the desert within a year now,” said former IAEA inspector David Albright, founder of the Institute for Science and International Security, at a conference call hosted by the Foundation for Defense of Democracies. “I think it would take them longer to have a missile deliverable nuclear warhead, but often countries don’t do that first.”

Other experts disagreed.

“To say that Iran could test a weapon in a year rests on heroic assumptions” about Iran’s engineering capabilities and luck, said former U.S. diplomat Mark Fitzpatrick, now an associate fellow at the International Institute for Strategic Studies. “The only real calculation one could make is how long it would take Iran to produce enough highly-enriched uranium to make a weapon.”

Iran would not only have to accumulate enough nuclear material to build a bomb, but also fashion it into a weapon alongside other components.

Iranian scientists could take a year “before they could solve all those other engineering problems,” according to Jarrett Blanc, who oversaw JCPOA implementation at the State Department and is now a senior fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

All three experts—Albright, Fitzgerald, and Blanc—agreed that Iran was now closer to accumulating enough nuclear material to build a bomb than it was in 2017.

Albright claimed that Iran could do this within three months as the “lowest credible number.”

Fitzpatrick, however, said that Iran still has less enriched uranium than it did before the JCPOA, telling the National Interest by email that “at the current rate of accumulation it would take more than three years to get to the point they were at in 2015.”

IAEA inspectors could raise an alarm before any of this happened, emphasized Richard Johnson, senior director for fuel cycle and verification at the Nuclear Threat Initiative.

“Iran can either do this quickly, or they can do it in secret,” said Johnson, who oversaw Iranian nuclear issues at the State Department until 2018.

He said that there would be “intensive monitoring and verification before you get to the flash in the desert” because Iran has continued to allow the United Nations watchdog to inspect its nuclear facilities, even after discarding other parts of the JCPOA.

“That is not going to be the first indication if Iran decides it’s going to try to race towards a nuclear bomb—a mushroom cloud,” Johnson said. “I would argue that this is the point of the JCPOA.”

Matthew Petti is a national security reporter at the National Interest. Follow him on Twitter: @matthew_petti.

National Interest

Conflict Escalates in Kashmir Before the First Nuclear War (Revelation 8 )

Indian forces kill 3 militants in Kashmir’s main city: police

Agence-France Presse

21 June 2020, 1:48 pm GMT-6

Indian security personnel head to the site of a firefight in the old city of Srinagar, Kashmir, on June 21, 2020

Three militants were killed in a shootout with Indian government forces in the heart of Kashmir’s main city Srinagar, police said Sunday, two days after eight rebels died in another gun battle.

New Delhi has been stepping up counter-insurgency efforts in the disputed territory since the nationwide coronavirus lockdown was imposed in late March.

The militants were killed in a firefight in the Zoonimar area of the densely populated old city of Srinagar, a police officer who asked to remain anonymous told AFP.

One home was destroyed during the clash.

Indian-administered Kashmir has been in turmoil since last August, when New Delhi revoked its semi-autonomous status and imposed a communications blackout that has not been fully lifted.

Pakistan criticised the change in Kashmir’s status, and there have been frequent exchanges of fire across the heavily militarised border between the nuclear-armed rivals.

On Sunday, Pakistan’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs said it had summoned the Indian charge d’affaires “to register Pakistan’s strong protest over the ceasefire violations” that, it said, led to the death of a teenage resident on Saturday. Two other civilians including a child were seriously hurt, the ministry said.

The clash in Srinagar was the second such encounter in the old city and brought the death toll of alleged militants to more than 100 this year.

Just over a month ago, the son of a top separatist leader and his associate were killed in the city.

The May incident — a day-long firefight that saw 15 homes blown up by police and soldiers — was the first armed encounter between rebels and government forces in Srinagar in two years.

Rebel groups have fought for decades for the region’s independence or its merger with Pakistan, and they enjoy broad popular support.

The fighting has left tens of thousands dead, mostly civilians, since 1989.

India has more than 500,000 troops stationed in Kashmir, a Himalayan territory also claimed by Pakistan.

The countries have fought two of their three wars since independence over the region.

India regularly blames Pakistan for arming and training rebels before sending them across the border, charges that Islamabad denies.

New Delhi also has a frontier dispute with neighbouring Nepal and tensions with China that last week left 20 Indians dead after a fight with nail-studded batons, rocks and fists. There were also an unknown number of Chinese casualties.

Indian security personnel head to the site of a firefight in the old city of Srinagar, Kashmir, on June 21, 2020