The History Of New York Earthquakes: Before The Sixth Seal (Rev 6:12)

1884 08 10 19:07 UTC

Magnitude 5.5

Intensity VII

USGS.gov

This severe earthquake affected an area roughly extending along the Atlantic Coast from southern Maine to central Virginia and westward to Cleveland, Ohio. Chimneys were knocked down and walls were cracked in several States, including Connecticut, New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania. Many towns from Hartford, Connecticut, to West Chester,Pennsylvania.

Property damage was severe at Amityville and Jamaica, New York, where several chimneys were “overturned” and large cracks formed in walls. Two chimneys were thrown down and bricks were shaken from other chimneys at Stratford (Fairfield County), Conn.; water in the Housatonic River was agitated violently. At Bloomfield, N.J., and Chester, Pa., several chimneys were downed and crockery was broken. Chimneys also were damaged at Mount Vernon, N.Y., and Allentown, Easton, and Philadelphia, Pa. Three shocks occurred, the second of which was most violent. This earthquake also was reported felt in Vermont, Virginia, and Washington, D.C. Several slight aftershocks were reported on August 11.

Nuclear War Simulator shows the devastation of the first Nuclear War (Revelation 8 )

Nuclear War Simulator shows the devastation that nukes could cause

Dec 13, 2019

The fallout of nuclear war is the premise for all sorts of films and video games. There is a sort of morbid curiosity to imagining what life would be like in a post-apocalyptic world caused by this type of warfare, but the threat of such an occurrence is anything but science fiction. To better understand exactly how devastating to the planet and the population that a global nuclear could cause, there’s Nuclear War Simulator.

One way to imagine Nuclear War Simulator is like a version of Google Earth with a nuclear option. With a couple clicks, you can find out what the fallout of a conflict between two nuclear superpowers would be, from casualties caused to the long-term effects that follow, including nuclear fallout and radiation levels. The simulator puts you in full control of the experience, allowing you to design your own nuclear forces, establish attack plans and explore potential conflict scenarios and even push to see just how many weapons a nation could produce if they decided to put the full force of their military and economy behind it. Along the way of seeing how these scenarios play out, the Nuclear War Simulator also lets you determine what your chance of survival would be in a nuclear holocaust, based on your location and how the attacks would play out.

It’s easy to view tools like Nuclear War Simulator (or others that came before it, like NukeMap) as a sort of game — especially when there are player controls that allow you to build up arsenals, plan attacks and watch the damage roll in — complete with a casualty counter that might feel like a scoreboard if viewed through the wrong lens. Ivan Stepanov, the simulator engineer behind Nuclear War Simulator, doesn’t want people to make that mistake when experiencing his simulation. “It is technically not a game as there is no goal and no reward for nuking everybody,” he told Vice. Instead, each simulation is intended to be viewed as something to avoid. Stepanov makes a point on his website to include links to the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN) and International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War (IPPNW) — two organizations that are fully dedicated to mitigating the risk of nuclear conflict arising.

While a simulation presents a useful visualization of just how a nuclear conflict might happen, it’s worth recognizing that these types of events aren’t purely hypothetical. There are approximately 14,000 nuclear weapons in the world currently, according to Arms Control Association — with about 9,500 of them in active military service (the rest are scheduled to be dismantled). About 90 percent of those weapons are owned by the United States and Russia, which explains why they are often at the center of any fear regarding nuclear war, but there are at least nine countries believed to have active nuclear programs — China, France and the United Kingdom all are considered nuclear states, while India, North Korea and Pakistan all have nuclear weapons and Israel is believed to as well. Many of these are nations that are regularly at odds when it comes to global policies, and while it is unlikely that any would want to escalate a disagreement to the level of nuclear warfare, the possibility of such a thing is an ever-present one for as long as the weapons remain active. The Doomsday Clock, which tracks the likelihood of a man-made global catastrophe, sits at just two minutes to midnight. Let’s hope the clock only ever strikes 12 in a simulator.

Global Dangers of the First Nuclear War (Revelation 8 )

Global dangers of horizontal nuclear proliferation in South Asia

Of the two proliferations–vertical and horizontal, the latter is said to be on the strategic agenda of Pakistan. While the first is related to modernisation of nuclear arsenals by the nuclear power states, the second meant spread of nuclear-related base materials, technology and technological knowledge to aspiring nuclear weapon states and to non-state actors. If the nuclear arsenals of countries increase in size and in average weapon yield in the  future, then multiple attacks on cities would become more likely in future war scenarios. This would further increase the risk of firestorms in cities suffering nuclear attack, which would increase the probability of toxic and radioactive debris reaching adjacent countries. It would also pose greater risk of regional climate disturbances arising from nuclear war. The use of weapons of mass destruction is the very worst way for nations to solve international disputes.

In context of Pakistan’s ambitious nuclear agenda is now drawing a not-so-unwilling Sri Lanka into the brewing nuclear whirlwind in south Asia. Evidently, ‘Pakistan is all set to begin consultations with Sri Lanka to help set up a nuclear power plant in Trincomallee’s,Sampur.

A hurt and frustrated Sri Lanka, so rendered by the outcome of the recently concluded United Nations Human Rights Commission (UNHRC) session, in all probability is very enthusiastic about the proposed venture, not so much because of the economic benefits it will bring about as it is because of the opportunity this new partnership presents to avenge the isolation, she suffered at the hands of India at said session.

Added to this impending disaster is the more immediate issue of deviating state capital away from poverty alleviation. It is therefore, imperative for all South Asian states to appreciate that compromising regional solid will amount to compromising the interests of individual states.

Although, the issue of nuclear proliferation remained at alert regionally and globally, the nuclear test by North Korea in October 2006, put renewed focus on the dangers of nuclear proliferation. Following the test, New Delhi swiftly condemned the test and indirectly highlighted Islamabad’s contribution to Pyongyang’s nuclear test.

On the other hand, Islamabad refuted any suggestion that the activities of the A.Q. Khan network had contributed to the said test and stated that North Korea’s nuclear programme is based on plutonium while Pakistan relies on uranium.

In this manner, for time being, both India and Pakistan tried to ensure that proliferation in South Asia was not equated with proliferation in North-east Asia. To a certain extent, the Bush administration obliged the sub-continental nuclear powers, as senior officials dismissed any parallels between North Korea’s path to nuclear weapons to those of India and Pakistan.

In the context, while Pakistan denied any links to the test, it did not help Islamabad’s case when Japanese sources stated that days before Pyongyang’s test, several Pakistani nuclear technicians arrived in North Korea through China. This augmented the suspicions that Pakistani agencies may have had some role in the test, perhaps through data sharing before or after explosion.

Role of Khan’s network

The A.Q. Khan’s network which provided nuclear assistance to North Korea and Iran has represented the most serious proliferation problem in recent years. Since Khan’s public confession in February 2004, Musharraf regime has consistently asserted that this network was the work of a rogue scientist and that the Pakistani government and its military leaders were not involved in these activities.

Analysts and officials in Pakistan as well as in the United States have expressed scepticism over Khan’s confession and the implicit professed innocence of the Pakistani political and military establishment. A highly publicised report released in April 2007 by the London-based International Institute for Strategic Studies, also stated that individuals and entities involved in the network could still be dormant and can conceivably be reactivated in the future.

Moreover, A.Q. Khan claimed in a signed statement that successive army chiefs in the 1990s, Generals MirzaAslam Beg and JehangirKaramat, had authorised the sales of nuclear technology. While this could be taken as Khan’s attempts to remove the burden of guilt, it is true that the military was closely associated with the nuclear and missile programmes.

In fact, in 1990, General Beg warned US government officials that Pakistan would be forced to provide nuclear technology to Tehran if Washington did not offer support to Pakistan. Other circumstantial evidence, such as visits by the Pakistani military leadership to North Korea throughout the nineties, suggests that there was a barter deal between Pyongyang and Islamabad.

Additionally, in August 2005, General Musharraf conceded that Khan had transferred centrifuge machines to North Korea through which uranium hexafluoride can be enriched for eventual processing into civilian reactors fuel or for military purposes.

Shipping out such large centrifuge machines without the military’s knowledge would have been impossible. For a country to acquire a nuclear delivery system, the decision-making process incorporates several factors, as well as the opinions of numerous government agencies to ensure compatibility among the various systems.

Dangers ahead

The issue of the Pakistani military-scientific establishment’s involvement or endorsement in the Khan’s network activities is crucial due to its implications for contemporary proliferation routes and processes. If these elements within and outside Pakistan and their methods and routes remain undiscovered, it has two broad consequences for proliferation in South Asia.

First, it allows Islamabad to potentially procure missile and nuclear technology in the future, in an attempt to catch-up with India. In this regard, a Pakistani national, Mohammed Aslam, working at the Tabani Corporation’s Moscow office, was named by the Russian government in 2006 as having attempted to acquire dual-use technology and other materials for Pakistan’s nuclear and missile development programmes.

Given Islamabad’s need to construct a secure deterrent against India, especially long-range missiles that can reach southern and eastern India, it is possible that the said case is an instance of continuing efforts to exploit non-state networks to procure prohibited equipment.

Author is Head of Department of Political Science, BNMU, West Campus, Saharsa, Bihar

Nations Clash Outside the Temple Walls (Revelation 11)

Gazans clash with IDF troops along border as Hamas marks 32 years since founding

Army vehicle hit by molotov cocktail but no injuries to troops; 5 Palestinians said hurt; senior Hamas member: Israeli captives won’t be freed ‘until our prisoners see the light’

By TOI staffToday, 6:22 pm

Several thousand Palestinians protested on the Gaza border Friday, with several hundred rioting and clashing with Israeli forces, as the coastal enclave’s Hamas rulers marked 32 years since the founding of the terror group.

The Hamas-run Gaza health ministry said five Palestinians were hurt in the clashes, which included the hurling of molotov cocktails and other objects at IDF soldiers.

Video shot near the southern city of Khan Younis showed a fire breaking out on the hood of an Israel Defense Forces vehicle after it was apparently struck by a fire bomb.

No soldiers were injured.

Around 2,000 people took part in protests at various spots along the Gaza border, according to Hebrew media reports.

In addition to the border clashes, thousands took part in a pair of rallies in the Gaza Strip to mark the 1987 anniversary of Hamas’s establishment.

Fathi Hammad, a member of the Islamist terror group’s politburo, thanked Hamas fighters who fired rockets at Israel, Channel 13 news reported.

“[Prime Minister Benjamin] Netanyahu’s time is over,” he was quoted saying, in apparent reference to the Israeli premier’s political and legal woes.

Hammad also commented on Israeli captives held by Hamas, following recent reports of efforts to broker a prisoner exchange between Israel and the terror group.

“The Israeli soldiers won’t see the light until our prisoners see the light,” Channel 12 quoted him as saying.

Hamas is believed to be holding captive two Israeli citizens — Avraham Abera Mengistu and Hisham al-Sayed — who are said to have entered the Gaza Strip of their own accord in 2014-2015.

It also holds the bodies of Hadar Goldin and Oron Shaul, IDF soldiers killed in the 2014 Gaza war.

“On the issue of prisoners, the enemy’s dawdling won’t help it,” Hammad said.

He warned the armed wing of Hamas would soon unveil a “new chapter in the battle” against Israel, without elaborating.

“Hamas will cut off the hand of anyone who tries to undermine the stability of security in Gaza,” he said. “Hamas will remain a torch of glory and pride for the Palestinians.”

Palestinians attend a rally marking the 32nd anniversary of the founding of the Hamas terror group, in Khan Younis in the southern Gaza Strip, December 13, 2019. (Said Khatib/AFP)

Friday’s border demonstrations were part of the weekly March of Return protests that began last March and resumed last week after a three-week hiatus following a large-scale battle in November between the IDF and Palestinian Islamic Jihad, the second largest terror group in Gaza.

Ahead of last week’s protests, IDF Chief of Staff Aviv Kohavi said Israel had a “special opportunity” to reach a long-term ceasefire with terror groups in the Gaza Strip.

Meeting with mayors of Gaza-adjacent communities, Kohavi indicated that Israel believed it could negotiate an oft-discussed long-term ceasefire agreement with Hamas, which has been the de facto ruler of Gaza since violently overthrowing the internationally recognized Palestinian Authority in 2007.

The army chief said this is due to the success of the IDF’s recent two-day battle with the Islamic Jihad, an operation that was dubbed “Black Belt.” Unlike in previous rounds of fighting, the Izz ad-Din al-Qassam Brigades, Hamas’s armed wing, stayed on the sidelines.

For more than the past year, Hamas has negotiated a series of unofficial ceasefire understandings with Israel.

The understandings have largely entailed Israel lifting restrictions on the movement of goods and people into and out of Gaza in exchange for Hamas and other terror groups in the coastal enclave maintaining relative quiet in the border region.

However, the informal agreements have not put an end to cross-border violence, as both Israel and terror groups in Gaza have recently participated in several short flareups.

Iraqi suicide bomber kills Antichrist’s Men

Iraq suicide bomber kills 7 Saraya al-Salam fighters

Iraqi army says militia fighters loyal to Muqtada al-Sadr were targeted at a base near Samarra

Staff Writer

SAMARRA, Iraq (AFP) – Eleven Iraqi fighters of were killed north of Baghdad on Thursday, December 12 when two suicide bombers attacked a base of Saraya al-Salam, an armed group led by Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr, the Iraqi army said.

The attack, which also wounded three fighters, was carried out by “a suicide terrorist,” the army said, using its standard term for Islamic State fighters.

Later, a second attacker blew up a car packed with explosives at the same site, killing another four fighters, the army said.

No group immediately claimed responsibility.

The attack took place late in the day near Tharthar lake southwest of Samarra, a longtime stronghold of Sunni jihadist groups around 100 km (65 miles) north of Baghdad.

Sadr’s Saraya al-Salam (Peace Companies) force took part in the grueling operation against ISIS after the group seized a third of Iraq and swathes of neighboring Syria in 2014.

Iraq declared victory over Islamic State in late 2017, but its sleeper cells continue to carry out attacks across the country.

Antichrist’s Men form ‘mini-state’ in Baghdad’s Tahrir Square (Revelation 13:18)

Iraqis form ‘mini-state’ in Baghdad’s Tahrir Square

With border guards, cleanup crews and hospitals, Iraqi protesters have created a mini-state in Baghdad’s Tahrir Square, offering the kinds of services they say their government has failed to provide.

“We’ve done more in two months than the state has done in 16 years,” said Haydar Chaker, a construction worker from Babylon Province, south of the capital.

Everyone has their role, from cooking bread to painting murals, with a division of labor and scheduled shifts.

Chaker traveled to Baghdad with his friends after the annual Arbaeen pilgrimage to the Shiite holy city of Karbalah. His pilgrim’s tent and cooking equipment were also useful at a protest encampment.

Installed in the iconic square whose name means “liberation,” he provides three meals a day to hundreds of protesters, cooking with donated food.

The self-reliant encampment is the heart of a protest movement that seeks the radical overhaul of Iraq’s political system, and despite frequent power cuts, it never stops beating.

At the entrances to the square, dozens of guards like Abou al-Hassan oversee makeshift barricades, where men and women search incoming visitors.

“We Iraqis rub shoulders with the military from a young age, so we pick up a thing or two,” said al-Hassan, dressed in camouflage fatigues. “We don’t need special training to detect saboteurs and keep them out … or to be able to defend our state.”

However on Friday last week, their “state” came under attack, when gunmen Iraqi authorities have failed to identify stormed a parking building occupied by protesters.

After the massacre that left 24 dead, protesters installed new checkpoints and closed an 18-story building overlooking the square. Infiltrated by intelligence agents, and at the mercy of gunmen able to cross police and military roadblocks at will, protesters insist their mini-state remains committed to non-violence.

Yet in a country where the influence and arsenals of pro-Iran armed groups continue to increase, the protest enclave has forged an alliance with another of Iraq’s states within a state.

Unarmed “blue helmets” from Shiite cleric Moqtada al-Sadr’s Saraya al-Salam (Peace Brigades) have intervened to protect protesters.

In front of the field clinics, as tuk-tuks zoom between clusters of protesters, dozens of volunteers sweep the pavement. Tahrir has never been so clean, protesters say, in contrast to its previous neglect by municipal workers.

With border guards, cleanup crews and hospitals, Iraqi protesters have created a mini-state in Baghdad’s Tahrir Square, offering the kinds of services they say their government has failed to provide.

“We’ve done more in two months than the state has done in 16 years,” said Haydar Chaker, a construction worker from Babylon Province, south of the capital.

Everyone has their role, from cooking bread to painting murals, with a division of labor and scheduled shifts.

Chaker traveled to Baghdad with his friends after the annual Arbaeen pilgrimage to the Shiite holy city of Karbalah. His pilgrim’s tent and cooking equipment were also useful at a protest encampment.

Installed in the iconic square whose name means “liberation,” he provides three meals a day to hundreds of protesters, cooking with donated food.

The self-reliant encampment is the heart of a protest movement that seeks the radical overhaul of Iraq’s political system, and despite frequent power cuts, it never stops beating.

At the entrances to the square, dozens of guards like Abou al-Hassan oversee makeshift barricades, where men and women search incoming visitors.

“We Iraqis rub shoulders with the military from a young age, so we pick up a thing or two,” said al-Hassan, dressed in camouflage fatigues. “We don’t need special training to detect saboteurs and keep them out … or to be able to defend our state.”

However on Friday last week, their “state” came under attack, when gunmen Iraqi authorities have failed to identify stormed a parking building occupied by protesters.

After the massacre that left 24 dead, protesters installed new checkpoints and closed an 18-story building overlooking the square. Infiltrated by intelligence agents, and at the mercy of gunmen able to cross police and military roadblocks at will, protesters insist their mini-state remains committed to non-violence.

Yet in a country where the influence and arsenals of pro-Iran armed groups continue to increase, the protest enclave has forged an alliance with another of Iraq’s states within a state.

Unarmed “blue helmets” from Shiite cleric Moqtada al-Sadr’s Saraya al-Salam (Peace Brigades) have intervened to protect protesters.

In front of the field clinics, as tuk-tuks zoom between clusters of protesters, dozens of volunteers sweep the pavement. Tahrir has never been so clean, protesters say, in contrast to its previous neglect by municipal workers.