The Sixth Seal Long Overdue (Revelation 6:12)

ON THE MAP; Exploring the Fault Where the Next Big One May Be Waiting

By MARGO NASH

Published: March 25, 2001

Alexander Gates, a geology professor at Rutgers-Newark, is co-author of ”The Encyclopedia of Earthquakes and Volcanoes,” which will be published by Facts on File in July. He has been leading a four-year effort to remap an area known as the Sloatsburg Quadrangle, a 5-by-7-mile tract near Mahwah that crosses into New York State. The Ramapo Fault, which runs through it, was responsible for a big earthquake in 1884, and Dr. Gates warns that a recurrence is overdue. He recently talked about his findings.

Q. What have you found?

A. We’re basically looking at a lot more rock, and we’re looking at the fracturing and jointing in the bedrock and putting it on the maps. Any break in the rock is a fracture. If it has movement, then it’s a fault. There are a lot of faults that are offshoots of the Ramapo. Basically when there are faults, it means you had an earthquake that made it. So there was a lot of earthquake activity to produce these features. We are basically not in a period of earthquake activity along the Ramapo Fault now, but we can see that about six or seven times in history, about 250 million years ago, it had major earthquake activity. And because it’s such a fundamental zone of weakness, anytime anything happens, the Ramapo Fault goes.

Q. Where is the Ramapo Fault?

 A. The fault line is in western New Jersey and goes through a good chunk of the state, all the way down to Flemington. It goes right along where they put in the new 287. It continues northeast across the Hudson River right under the Indian Point power plant up into Westchester County. There are a lot of earthquakes rumbling around it every year, but not a big one for a while.

Q. Did you find anything that surprised you?

A. I found a lot of faults, splays that offshoot from the Ramapo that go 5 to 10 miles away from the fault. I have looked at the Ramapo Fault in other places too. I have seen splays 5 to 10 miles up into the Hudson Highlands. And you can see them right along the roadsides on 287. There’s been a lot of damage to those rocks, and obviously it was produced by fault activities. All of these faults have earthquake potential.

Q. Describe the 1884 earthquake.

A. It was in the northern part of the state near the Sloatsburg area. They didn’t have precise ways of describing the location then. There was lots of damage. Chimneys toppled over. But in 1884, it was a farming community, and there were not many people to be injured. Nobody appears to have written an account of the numbers who were injured.

Q. What lessons we can learn from previous earthquakes?

A. In 1960, the city of Agadir in Morocco had a 6.2 earthquake that killed 12,000 people, a third of the population, and injured a third more. I think it was because the city was unprepared.There had been an earthquake in the area 200 years before. But people discounted the possibility of a recurrence. Here in New Jersey, we should not make the same mistake. We should not forget that we had a 5.4 earthquake 117 years ago. The recurrence interval for an earthquake of that magnitude is every 50 years, and we are overdue. The Agadir was a 6.2, and a 5.4 to a 6.2 isn’t that big a jump.

Q. What are the dangers of a quake that size?

A. When you’re in a flat area in a wooden house it’s obviously not as dangerous, although it could cut off a gas line that could explode. There’s a real problem with infrastructure that is crumbling, like the bridges with crumbling cement. There’s a real danger we could wind up with our water supplies and electricity cut off if a sizable earthquake goes off. The best thing is to have regular upkeep and keep up new building codes. The new buildings will be O.K. But there is a sense of complacency.

MARGO NASH

Photo: Alexander Gates, a Rutgers geologist, is mapping a part of the Ramapo Fault, site of previous earthquakes. (John W. Wheeler for The New York Times)

The Antichrist Consolidates His Power

Iraq’s Sadr and Amiri announce political alliance

Announcement came at a joint press conference in the Shiite holy city of Najaf. (AFP)

Nationalist cleric Muqtada al-Sadr and Iranian-backed militia chief Hadi al-Amiri, who won first and second place respectively in Iraq’s May parliamentary election, announced on Tuesday an alliance between their political blocs.

The announcement came at a joint press conference in the Shiite holy city of Najaf, state television said.

Earlier in the day, Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi said he opposed any repeat of the May 12 parliamentary election, and warned that anyone who tried to sabotage the political process would be punished, after allegations of electoral fraud raised tensions.

Last Update: Tuesday, 12 June 2018 KSA 22:56 – GMT 19:56

The Large Nuclear Horn of Iran is Shrinking (Daniel 8)

Iran is losing power in the Middle East

Iran Is Losing Power in the Middle East

Iran Focus

London, 12 Jun – Iran’s Shiite Crescent across the Middle East is waning as the four Arab capitals that the mullahs recently boasted about controlling are turning against them.

Iran created chaos in Syria, Lebanon, Yemen, and Iraq, largely through proxy terrorist groups, in order to destabilise them and take control. The mullahs wanted to subjugate the people of these nations and have them all bow down to the Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei. In short, Iran’s control over these countries was basically colonialism by another name and, as with all colonial powers, Iran will be forced out.

Iran had a lot of free reign over the Middle East in the past couple of years, as its 2015 nuclear deal with six world powers provided money to support terrorist groups and further destabilise the Middle East with no oversight.

Now, Iran is on the defensive after Donald Trump withdrew the US from the deal and promised to reinstate more sanctions against the Mullahs, therefore cutting off their cash cow. Despite some scaremongering about a US-Iran war, this shows that the real way to target Iran is through diplomatic measures.

On top of the US sanctions, which will also affect the ability of other countries to trade with Iran, Russia has also decided to get tough on Iran in Syria, where they are both fighting to preserve the dictatorship of Bashar Assad. Russia recently ordered Iran away from the Israeli border with Syria, upon Israel’s request, and Iranian troops were forced to comply.

While over in Iraq, Muqtada Sadr, a candidate opposed to Iranian interference, swept to victory in the recent elections, which means that Iran will hold less power over its neighbour.

In Lebanon, where Iran backed Hezbollah holds most of the power in the government, there is little outside pressure to remove them, but the Lebanese people are still largely opposed to Iranian interference.

News editor Ali Al-Amin wrote: “The four Arab capitals are still in an unenviable situation. The outcome of the Iranian influence in them has only brought insecurity to citizens and made them witnesses to regression and fracture of their countries.

The Iranian leadership today is facing the dilemma that it has contributed to in these capitals. The only way out of this dilemma requires yielding to the conditions of the big powers, which have apparently decided to reduce the role of Iran.”

One of the best ways to end Iranian interventionism is to support the Iranian Resistance in their bid for regime change, something that will be the main subject of discussion at the Free Iran gathering in Paris on June 30.

Antichrist Warns of Civil War

Iraq-Shiite-cleric-Moqtada-al-Sadr-stare-Getty-640x480After ballot box fire, Iraqi cleric Sadr warns of civil war

Ahmed Aboulenein

BAGHDAD (Reuters) – Shi’ite cleric Moqtada al-Sadr urged Iraqis on Monday to unite rather than squabble over a possible rerun of the election his bloc won last month, a message apparently meant to defuse political tension after a ballot box storage depot caught fire.

Certain parties are trying to drag Iraq into civil war, Sadr said, adding that he would not participate in one.

Parliament has mandated a manual recount of the election in which a number of parties alleged fraud. A storage site holding half of Baghdad’s ballot boxes went up in flames on Sunday in what Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi denounced as a “plot to harm the nation and its democracy”.

An Iraqi court ordered the arrest of four people accused of setting fire to the storage site, state television reported. Three of them were policemen and one an employee of the Independent High Elections Commission.

Iraqi authorities said the ballot boxes were saved but the fire has added to fears of violence.

“What Moqtada said about (Iraq) being close to some sort of armed conflict is concerning. The situation is tense and it seems to be on the brink of conflict,” said Renad Mansour, research fellow at Chatham House in London.

Sadr, a Shi’ite cleric who once led violent campaigns against the U.S. occupation that ended in 2011, has emerged as a nationalist opponent of powerful Shi’ite Muslim parties allied with neighboring Iran.

“Stop fighting for seats, posts, gains, influence, power, and rulership,” he wrote in an article published by his office.

“Is it not time to stand as one for building and reconstruction, instead of burning ballot boxes or repeating elections just for one seat or two?”

Sadr has in the past mobilized tens of thousands of followers to protest government policies he opposed.

The election, which was the first since the defeat of Islamic State militants who seized a third of Iraq in 2014, raised hopes that Iraqis could put aside sectarian divisions to rebuild.

One of Sadr’s top aides said on Sunday the fire was intended either to force a rerun of the election or to conceal fraud.

ELECTION REPEAT UNLIKELY

But a repeat of the election is unlikely, analysts say, as none of the top parties have endorsed this step, and many incumbent lawmakers have lost their seats and thus lack legitimacy in the eyes of the public.

The Supreme Federal Court is the only entity that has the right to decide on a repeat, not the government or parliament, Abadi’s spokesman said on Monday.

A spokesman for Hadi al-Amiri, whose Fatih alliance of groups linked to pro-Iran Shi’ite militias came second in the election behind Sadr’s bloc, said he did not favor a repeat.

“The middle of the road solution is a manual recount,” said Karim al-Nuri, referring to the fraud allegations.

Some of Iran’s other supporters, such as former prime minister Nuri al-Maliki, whose bloc performed below expectations in the election, would benefit.

At the same time, a recount might harm Iran in other ways. Tehran is accused by some parties in two provinces of helping a Kurdish party allied with it commit election fraud.

“Iran would have preferred if Fatih and (Maliki’s) State of Law (list) had done better than Sadr so any kind of redo where a different scenario comes out is better for Iran,” said Mansour.

“It is not an ideal situation for Iran and they might support a redo, but actually a recount might implicate them if the allegations in the north are correct.”

VOTING EQUIPMENT

In the election, Iraq used an electronic vote-counting system for the first time. Some Iraqi politicians had argued that the manual recount was necessary to make sure that the electronic system did not hide fraud.

Miru Systems, the Korean company that provided the electronic equipment, said there was nothing wrong with it.

“We have checked our election device provided to Iraq after the fraud allegation erupted, and found out that there have been no malfunction in the device nor its system,” said a spokesman.

Abadi has blamed the Independent High Elections Commission, which introduced the electronic system, for what he said were dangerous violations, and parliament voted to suspend the board of commissioners and replace them with judges.

The commission opposes the recount decision and has appealed against it but the judiciary has already started implementing parliament’s measures, naming a new head for the commission from within its ranks on Monday.

“There is a lack of clarity as to who is in charge, what procedure is the legal procedure. Everyone is doing their own thing. The government institutions meant to monitor this process are neither independent nor powerful,” said Mansour.

Reporting by Ahmed Aboulenein with additional reporting by Haejin Choi in Seoul; Editing by Michael Georgy and Mark Heinrich