The Antichrist’s Men (Revelation 13:18)

An Iraqi Shiite fighter from the Saraya al-Salam (Peace Brigades), a group formed by Iraqi Shiite Muslim cleric Muqtada al-Sadr, on the back of a vehicle leaves Baghdad for the city of Samarra, some 120 kilometers north of the Iraqi capital, to fight against ISIS on March 15, 2015. Photo: AFP/Sabah Arar

An Iraqi Shiite fighter from the Saraya al-Salam (Peace Brigades), a group formed by Iraqi Shiite Muslim cleric Muqtada al-Sadr, on the back of a vehicle leaves Baghdad for the city of Samarra, some 120 kilometers north of the Iraqi capital, to fight against ISIS on March 15, 2015. Photo: AFP/Sabah Arar

ERBIL, Kurdistan Region — The Saraya al-Salam militia of the Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr entered Kirkuk last month only to provide security to its residents and not to take control of territories, says the group’s spokesperson, and that they aim to be incorporated into the Iraqi army.

“We didn’t enter Kirkuk to control territory,” Safa al-Tamimi, a commander and spokesperson for Saraya al-Salam told Rudaw TV on Saturday. “Rather, we went there to protect the security of the people of the city, and convey the message of peace, love and certainty.”

Al-Tamimi said that upon entering Kirkuk, his militia group was welcomed by the city’s Kurdish, Turkmen and Arab communities. He also said they want to integrate the Hashd al-Shaabi forces with the Iraqi army and security forces.

Al-Tamimi said the main objective of the Saraya al-Salam from day one has been to support the Iraqi army.

“We have always been a supporting group within the Iraqi army and security establishments.” Al-Tamimi maintained. “Our only objective has been to support the Iraqi army and neutralize the danger against sacred places that were attacked by ISIS militants.”

“This has been our aim since our establishment, since ISIS attacked Iraq in 2014.”

Sayara al-Salam militiamen were part of the overall Iraqi incursion into Kirkuk and other disputed territories in October.

Al-Tamiki said that his group has carried out no armed activity since entering the region and that they have reassured all parties of their intentions.

“We have done no military activities in Kirkuk and every party knows this,” he said. “We reiterate that we will always be a guarantor for the entire nation of Iraq,” al-Tamimi detailed.

On reports of human rights abuses al-Tamimi said that all militia groups should not be lumped together, and that some of the violations might have been perpetrated by individuals.

“Not all the units of the Hashd al-Shaabi forces are responsible for these violations if there had been any,” he said. “The wrongdoings should have been on a personal level, if some disorganized and disobedient units have done something wrong.”

“The Hashd al-Shaabi commanders were doing their best to prevent these individual violations.” Al-Tamimi said.

Al-Tamimi claimed that their leader, al-Sadr, wants his and all other militia groups to be incorporated into government forces and come under the prime minister’s control.

“Since the formation of the Saraya al-Salam, Muqtada Sadr has been calling for the Hashd al-Shaabi units to be under the command of the commander-in-chief of the armed forces,” he explained. “In his first statement, his request was that we form a military unit that is part of Iraq’s security forces.”

“This is our request too, and we hope this happens. We hope that organized units are incorporated into the Iraqi army and security forces. And this is to reach the high aim which is to raise the Iraqi flag and that of its army.”

On November 7, Sadr called upon his Saraya al-Salam militia group to pull out their forces from the city of Kirkuk within 72 hours.

Sadr explained then that the administrative affairs of Kirkuk as well as all the others “have to be handed over to the security forces.”

Israel Tries to Hold Back the Iranian Horn

If Israel had not taken action, Iran would already possess nuclear weapons, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said Monday, in response to a joint U.S.-Russian statement Saturday outlining principles for post-war Syria.

Iran is a longtime backer of Syrian President Bashar Assad. Israel has long complained about the involvement of Iran and Iranian proxy Hezbollah in the ongoing civil war in Syria. Israel has said it will not tolerate the presence of Iran or its Shiite allies in Syria, particularly near Syria’s shared border with Israel.

Israel signaled on Sunday that it would keep up military strikes to thwart the delivery of weapons to Hezbollah, as well as to prevent any encroachment by Iranian-allied forces.

“We are making sure Israel is secure, and we are doing it well – you know that,” Netanyahu told his Likud party at their weekly meeting on Monday.

“We are doing it with a balanced combination of strength and responsibility. We are defending our borders, we are defending our country and we will continue to do this,” he said.

“I have communicated to our friends in Washington, first of all, and also to our friends in Moscow that Israel will take action in Syria, including southern Syria, as we see fit and according to our security needs. That is the deciding factor, and it will continue to be the deciding factor.”

Later, during an address before the Knesset plenum, Netanyahu said that “we are standing shoulder to shoulder with the Arab world’s moderate states. Together we are confronting the threat of radical Islam, whether it comes from the direction of Iran or of ISIS or from others.”

“If it hadn’t been for our [Israel’s] actions, Iran would have become nuclear a long time ago. Iran knows very well, and everyone here should know, that we will not tolerate [Iran’s] military presence in Syria,” he said. “At this point, the only reason Iran does not possess nuclear weapons is because of our activity.”

America Prepares for War Against Korea

The US Marine Corps turned 242 years old on November 10.

“At places like Trenton, Tripoli, Chapultepec, Belleau Wood, Guadalcanal, Chosin, Khe Sanh, Fallujah, Sangin, and so many others, Marines have fought with an inner spirit — a spirit that bonds us, binds us together as a cohesive team. It’s that intangible spirit that has formed the foundation of our warfighting reputation for the past 242 years,” Marine Corps Commandant Gen. Robert Neller said in a message this year.

Below, you can see some of the best photos from the Marine Corps’ storied history, pulled from its archives.

Amanda Macias composed an earlier version of this post.

Created in 1798, the Marine Corps band was called “The President’s Own” by President Thomas Jefferson during his inaugural ball. Since then, it has played at every presidential inauguration. Here’s the band in 1893.

In the early 1900s, Marines were active in China and in the Philippines. This photo, from 1907, shows Marines in front of the Sphinx in Egypt.

These Marines are posing with a German trench mortar captured in France in 1918. Mortars were especially useful because a mortar round could be aimed to fall directly into the trenches that criss-crossed World War I battlefields.

Marines wearing gas masks in France in 1918. About 2,400 Marines died in World War I.

Here, Marines practice carrying a wounded comrade in western Germany sometime around 1918.

Marine Corps experimentation with aviation began in conjunction with the Navy around 1919. This 1930 photo shows a Marine flying a Grumman FF-2 Navy plane. Within a decade the Marines had its first aircraft wing, which is now based in Okinawa, Japan.

Japan’s surprise attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941 brought the US into World War II. This photo shows a Marine with a piece of shrapnel removed from his arm after the attack.

Allied efforts to dislodge the Japanese from islands in the Pacific started with the Marines’ deployment to the tropical island of Guadalcanal. This photo shows two Marines waiting for “chow call,” or mealtime, in 1943.

Marines on a landing barge take one last look at a “good-luck picture” of a pin-up girl in 1943 as they approach the Japanese-held island of Tarawa in the Pacific.

Marines on a landing barge take one last look at a

US Marine Corps photo

In this 1943 photo, James Wrobel designs the insignia for Marine Fighter Squadron 312. The official Marine Corps emblem has an eagle, a globe, and an anchor. The eagle represents readiness and precision. The globe represents the Corps’ worldwide presence. The anchor reflects the Corps’ naval heritage and ability to access any coastline in the world.

Here, Marines land on the Japanese-held island of Saipan in 1944. Amphibious warfare has been a mainstay of the Corps’ operations.

Here, Marines land on the Japanese-held island of Saipan in 1944. Amphibious warfare has been a mainstay of the Corps' operations.

US Marine Corps photo

Here, Marines on the South Pacific island of Bougainville slog through thick mud to get ammunition to the front line.

Marines on Bougainville get letters from home.

Marines from the Navajo tribe used their native language to send coded radio transmissions to units overseas. Navajo code talkers, like the ones below, seen in 1943, were said to be faster and more accurate than Morse Code. Intercepted Navajo codes were never successfully deciphered by the enemy.

Marine artillerymen wearing barely any protective gear plug their ears while firing a 155 mm howitzer on northern Iwo Jima.

This photo shows a Navy corpsman giving a wounded Marine blood plasma on an island in the Pacific in 1944.

Marines raise the American flag at the top of Mount Suribachi in 1945. This photo actually shows the second flag raised on the mountain that day. The first flag was too small to be seen easily.

Marines seen here atop an amphibian tractor celebrate the end of World War II and “Victory over Japan Day” in 1945.

The North Korean invasion of South Korea brought the US into the Korean War. This 1950 photo shows Marine air and ground units during the war.

In the US, women began training at the Marine Corps Recruit Depot in Parris Island, South Carolina, in 1949. All female recruits are still trained at Parris Island.

Marines line up at a makeshift Post Exchange in Korea to get comfort items like candy, cigarettes, and soft drinks.

Marines scatter away from a CH-46 helicopter that is exploding after it was shot down during combat in Vietnam. At least 13 Marines were reported killed in the crash, with another three badly burned.

Khe Sanh, in southern Vietnam, faced the heaviest rocket and artillery attacks from the North Vietnamese. The Marine below was stationed there in 1968.

Here, an exhausted Marine takes a quick break from fighting in Hue in 1968.

Marine Cpl. Larry Nabb reads next to a Christmas tree at Quang Tri Combat Base, Vietnam, in 1968.

A Marine dismantles a 122 mm field gun that was captured during battle in 1969.

Marines carry supplies from a cargo helicopter to their temporary base near Da Nang in 1969.

A Marine fills out his voter-registration card ahead of the 1968 presidential election.

In 1983, the US embassy in Beirut was bombed by Islamic terrorists. At the time, it was the deadliest attack on a US diplomatic mission. This photo shows a Marine wearing a gas mask while digging through the rubble to find survivors.

In 1983, the US embassy in Beirut was bombed by Islamic terrorists. At the time, it was the deadliest attack on a US diplomatic mission. This photo shows a Marine wearing a gas mask while digging through the rubble to find survivors.

Bill Foley/AP

In this photo from 1990, Marine David Gurfein sits next to a Christmas tree in Saudi Arabia during Operation Desert Storm.

Marines cover each other as they prepare to enter one of Saddam Hussein’s palaces in Baghdad during Operation Iraqi Freedom in 2003.

In this iconic photo, a Marine looks on as a statue of Saddam Hussein is pulled down in central Baghdad’s Firdaus Square on April 9, 2003.

One of fiercest Marine battles in Iraq was in Fallujah, known as the “city of mosques,” in 2004. It was the only battle in Marine Corps history where leaflets were dropped to alert civilians that troops were coming and to unnerve the enemy.

Marine Lance Cpl. James Blake Miller, dubbed the “Marlboro Marine,” became the face of the Iraq War after his photo was taken by a Los Angeles Times reporter in Fallujah in 2004.

The “Darkhorse” Marines in the 3rd Battalion, 5th Regiment, suffered the highest casualty rate of any Marine unit deployed to Helmand province in southern Afghanistan, following the heavy Marine-led assault on Marjah. Here, some members of the unit are under enemy sniper fire in 2010.

The

US Marine Corps Photo

The Marine Corps also trains to fight and survive in water. Here, Marines conduct an underwater gear shed during a basic swim qualification course at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, North Carolina, on March 16, 2016.

Marines also train to operate in the air. Here, a crew master observes an F/A-18C Hornet approach a refueling hose during Exercise Pitch Black 2016 at Royal Australian Air Force Base Tindal on August 9, 2016.

Built in 1861, the Marine Corps Recruit Depot in Parris Island consists of 8,095 acres of various types of terrain for the recruits to use as their learning facility. About 20,000 recruits are trained here every year.

Built in 1861, the Marine Corps Recruit Depot in Parris Island consists of 8,095 acres of various types of terrain for the recruits to use as their learning facility. About 20,000 recruits are trained here every year.

US Marine Corps Photo

Every recruit received at Parris Island is transformed by legendary Marine drill instructors like the one pictured here. Marine recruits are typically younger than those in the Corps’ sister-service branches, and each DI wants to ensure they can survive combat.

Today, more than 200,000 active-duty and reserve Marines are serving air, land, and sea. The Marines pictured here respond, “I do” during the oath of office at the US Naval Academy Class of 2012 graduation and commissioning ceremony.

History Says Expect The Sixth Seal In New York (Revelation 6:12)

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If the past is any indication, New York can be hit by an earthquake, claims John Armbruster, a seismologist at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory.

Based on historical precedent, Armbruster says the New York City metro area is susceptible to an earthquake of at least a magnitude of 5.0 once a century.

According to the New York Daily News, Lynn Skyes, lead author of a recent study by seismologists at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory adds that a magnitude-6 quake hits the area about every 670 years, and magnitude-7 every 3,400 years.

A 5.2-magnitude quake shook New York City in 1737 and another of the same severity hit in 1884.

Tremors were felt from Maine to Virginia.

There are several fault lines in the metro area, including one along Manhattan’s 125th St. – which may have generated two small tremors in 1981 and may have been the source of the major 1737 earthquake, says Armbruster.

There’s another fault line on Dyckman St. and one in Dobbs Ferry in nearby Westchester County.

“The problem here comes from many subtle faults,” explained Skyes after the study was published.

He adds: “We now see there is earthquake activity on them. Each one is small, but when you add them up, they are probably more dangerous than we thought.”

“Considering population density and the condition of the region’s infrastructure and building stock, it is clear that even a moderate earthquake would have considerable consequences in terms of public safety and economic impact,” says the New York City Area Consortium for Earthquake Loss Mitigation on its website.

Armbruster says a 5.0-magnitude earthquake today likely would result in casualties and hundreds of millions of dollars in damage.

“I would expect some people to be killed,” he notes.

The scope and scale of damage would multiply exponentially with each additional tick on the Richter scale. (ANI)

The Power of Trump at the End (Revelation 8)

https://i0.wp.com/cdn.images.dailystar.co.uk/dynamic/1/photos/759000/620x/Donald-Trump-nuclear-war-562141.jpgTrump can get around safeguards and order a nuclear attack

David Pugliese, Ottawa Citizen
More from David Pugliese, Ottawa Citizen

There was a lot of news coverage about words spoken by the top US nuclear commander at the Halifax International Security Forum on Saturday.

Gen. John Hyten, commander of US Strategic Command which oversees America’s nuclear weapons, said he would not follow an “illegal order from the president if he was ordered to launch a nuclear attack.

“I provide advice to the President,” Hyten said. “He’ll tell me what to do, and if it’s illegal, guess what’s going to happen? I’m gonna say, ‘Mr. President, that’s illegal.’ Guess what he’s going to do? He’s going to say, ‘What would be legal?’ And we’ll come up with options of a mix of capabilities to respond to whatever the situation is, and that’s the way it works. It’s not that complicated.”

But there are ways around the system. Bruce Blair, a former nuclear missile launch officer and co-founder of the Global Zero group that advocates eliminating nuclear weapons, told the Associated Press the Strategic Command chief might, in effect, be bypassed by the president.

A president can transmit his nuclear attack order directly to a Pentagon war room, Blair said. From there it would go to the men and women who would turn the launch keys.

Then there is another scenario. What happens if Trump’s order to launch a nuclear missile attack is not illegal but just plain reckless?

The U.S. military followed the Bush administration orders to invade Iraq in 2003, with the claim that Saddam Hussein had weapons of mass destruction. He didn’t of course. The “intelligence” that Saddam Hussein had WMDs was fabricated. The invasion was launched.

And 14 years later, the U.S. is still fighting in Iraq. Iraq’s society is in ruins.

A nuclear attack, of course, would be on a whole different level of destructiveness.

(With files from Associated Press)