USA’s Fukushima At The Sixth Seal (Rev 6)

 

Recent series of Indian Point shutdowns worst in years
Ernie Garcia, elgarcia@lohud.com
BUCHANAN — Four unplanned reactor shutdowns over a two-month period at Indian Point are the most setbacks the nuclear power plant has experienced in years.
A review of unplanned shutdowns from January 2012 to the present showed this year’s events happened within a short time frame, between May 7 and July 8, in contrast with events from other years that were more spread out, according to data released by Indian Point.
So many mishaps at the Entergy-owned plant haven’t occurred since 2009, when one of two units at the Buchanan site experienced a similar series, said plant spokesman Jerry Nappi.
Besides a May 9 transformer failure that spilled some 3,000 gallons of oil into the Hudson River, this year’s shutdowns were prompted by a May 7 steam leak, a July 8 pump motor failure and a June 15 switch yard breaker failure offsite in a Consolidated Edison substation.
If a nuclear plant has more than three unplanned shutdowns in a nine-month period, its performance indicator could be changed by the federal Nuclear Regulatory Commission, which results in additional oversight. That’s what happened with Entergy’s Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station in Plymouth, Mass., after four unplanned shutdowns in 2013.
So far, Entergy said there doesn’t appear to be a pattern to the Indian Point shutdowns.
“You do want to look at these events holistically to see if there is something in common, but you also look individually to see what the causes were,” Nappi said. “A plant shutdown in and of itself is not a safety issue.”
One of the four recent Buchanan shutdowns triggered a special inspection by the NRC and calls to close the nuclear plant by environmental groups and elected officials. Gov. Andrew Cuomo has said in the past Indian Point should close, but his office did not respond to a request for comment about whether the recent shutdowns have prompted any state scrutiny.
The NRC is expected to release a quarterly report on Indian Point this month that will address the transformer failure and, by year’s end, is planning an inspection of the transformer and an analysis of transformer issues since 2007.
Besides its transformer-related inquiries, the other three shutdowns have not raised “any immediate safety concerns or crossed any thresholds that would result in additional NRC oversight,” agency spokesman Neil Sheehan wrote in an email.
The unplanned shutdowns at Indian Point and Pilgrim in Massachusetts were mostly preventable, said Paul Blanch, a former Indian Point employee with 45 years of nuclear power experience.
“For this to happen this frequently indicates a deeper problem,” he said. “I believe it’s management oversight in the maintenance of these plants.”
Nappi said the transformer that failed May 9 and caused a fire and oil spill into the Hudson was regularly monitored. Investigators determined the failure was due to faulty insulation.
“The transformer inspection and reviews were in accordance with our standards and industry expectations, yet there was no indication the transformer was going to fail,” Nappi said.
The NRC conducted a separate, but related special inspection into the May 9 incident that focused on a half-inch of water that collected in an electrical switchgear room floor. Inspectors determined a fire suppression system’s valve failed to close properly.
Inspectors noted in their report that Entergy knew about that problem since April 2011 and replaced the valve but didn’t discover the actual cause — a dysfunctional switch — until after the fire.
Indian Point’s Unit 3 was down 19 days May through July, with the transformer failure accounting for 16 days. The shutdowns didn’t cause the public any supply problems because New York’s grid can import electricity from other states and New York has an energy plan to maintain reliability, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration.
The nuclear energy industry judges a power plant on how continuously it produces energy, which is called a capacity factor.
There were 100 nuclear plants in the United States in 2014, a record year in terms of efficiency. In January, the Nuclear Energy Institute announced the U.S. average capacity factor was 91.9 percent.
Indian Point has an above-average efficiency rate. The plant’s Unit 2 and 3 reactors were each online more than 99 percent of the time during their most recent two-year operating cycles. They are currently in the middle of other cycles.

Antichrist Followers Protest Iraq’s Elections


IRAQI PARLIAMENT TO SUMMON HEAD OF ELECTORAL COMMISSION ON MONDAY
BAGHDAD – Iraqi lawmakers have voted to summon the Head of Iraq’s High Electoral Commission, Sarbast Mustafa on Monday (April 17) as part of the country’s efforts for reform in the electoral body ahead of provincial elections.
The Iraqi Parliament was set to put to vote whether to stick to current laws regarding the country’s provincial elections or make amendments on them. The parliament has however rescheduled the voting to the day after tomorrow.
Iraq’s provincial elections are due to take place in September this year.
The parliament vote comes as Shia cleric Muqtada al-Sadr had threatened to order his supporters to boycott the next parliamentary election if the electoral commission and the election’s laws remain as they currently stand. The parliamentary vote is scheduled for April, 2018.
Tens of thousands of Iraqi people, addressed by Sadr, demonstrated on March 24 in Baghdad against county’s the electoral commission.
(NRT)

Antichrist Protests Al-Maliki’s Governance


Maliki handed over Iraqi cities to ISIS, Moqtada al-Sadr representative says
A representative of prominent Shiite cleric Moqtada al-Sadr in Baghdad, Ibrahim al-Jabri, said on Friday that former Iraqi Prime Minister “Nouri al-Maliki is behind the current crises that have hit Iraq,” adding: “Maliki handed over several Iraqi provinces to ISIS.”
Jabri said “Maliki cannot do anything about the suffering of the Iraqi people because he caused the suffering and the killing of our sons by security forces at the Speicher base.”
Camp Speicher, officially known as the Tikrit Air Academy, is an air installation near Tikrit in northern Iraq.
With Iraqi forces all but certain to defeat ISIS in Mosul this year, Sadr has begun mobilizing his supporters ahead of two elections, for provincial councils in September and the crucial parliamentary vote, by April 2018.
Iraqi Shiite cleric Moqtada al-Sadr delivers a speech during Friday prayer at the Great Mosque of Kufa in the city of the same name. (AFP)
His main rival is former Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki, a pro-Iranian politician who started positioning himself last year as a possible kingmaker or even for a return to the premiership itself.
Maliki’s eight-year rule ended in 2014, when the Iraqi army collapsed in the face of an ISIS offensive, forcing him to hand over power to current Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi. Both men are members of the Shiite Dawa party.
He now holds the ceremonial position of vice president but still wields considerable influence, chairing the Dawa party which controls the largest bloc in parliament.
(With Reuters)
Last Update: Saturday, 15 April 2017 KSA 08:42 – GMT 05:42

Korea Prepares For All Out War

North Korea has rolled out intercontinental ballistic missiles and other military hardware at a massive parade to celebrate the birthday of the country’s late founder, as third-generation leader Kim Jong Un looked on in delight
PYONGYANG, North Korea (AP) — North Korea paraded its intercontinental ballistic missiles in a massive military display in central Pyongyang on Saturday, with ruler Kim Jong Un looking on with delight as his nation flaunted its increasingly sophisticated military hardware amid rising regional tensions.
Kim did not speak during the annual parade, which celebrates the 1912 birthday of his late grandfather Kim Il Sung, North Korea’s founding ruler, but a top official warned that the North would stand up to any threat posed by the United States.
Choe Ryong Hae said President Donald Trump was guilty of “creating a war situation” on the Korean Peninsula by dispatching U.S. forces to the region.
We will respond to an all-out war with an all-out war and a nuclear war with our style of a nuclear attack,” said Choe, widely seen by analysts as North Korea’s No. 2 official.
The parade, the annual highlight of North Korea’s most important holiday, came amid growing international worries that North Korea may be preparing for its sixth nuclear test or a major missile launch, such as its first flight test of an ICBM capable of reaching U.S. shores.
But if the parade signaled a readiness for war, North Korea has long insisted that its goal is peace — and survival — with the growing arsenal a way to ensure that the government in Pyongyang is not easily overthrown.
North Korea saw the toppling of Saddam Hussein in Iraq and Moammar Gadhafi in Libya — neither of whom had nuclear weapons — as proof of the weapons’ power.
It will be the largest of miscalculations if the United States treats us like Iraq and Libya, which are living out miserable fates as victims of aggression, and Syria, which didn’t respond immediately even after it was attacked,” said a Friday statement by the general staff of the North Korean army, according to the official Korean Central News Agency.
Also Friday, North Korea’s vice foreign minister told The Associated Press in an exclusive interview that Trump’s tweets — he recently tweeted, for example, that the North is “looking for trouble” — have inflamed tensions.
“Trump is always making provocations with his aggressive words,” Han Song Ryol said.
U.S. retaliatory strikes earlier this month against Syria over a chemical weapons attack on civilians, coupled with Trump’s dispatching of what he called an “armada” of ships to the region, touched off fears in South Korea that the United States was preparing for military action against the North.
But U.S. officials told The Associated Press on Friday that the Trump administration had settled on a policy that will emphasize increasing pressure on Pyongyang with the help of China, North Korea’s only major ally, instead of military options or trying to overthrow Kim’s regime.
A U.S. military official, who requested anonymity to discuss planning, said the United States doesn’t intend to use military force against North Korea in response to either a nuclear test or a missile launch.
Kim, wearing a suit and tie, was greeted Saturday with thunderous — and extensively practiced — applause as he stepped into view on a large podium, clapping to acknowledge the thousands of soldiers and civilians taking part in the parade at Kim Il Sung Square.
The parade, an elaborate display of the state’s immense power, involves tens of thousands of participants, from goose-stepping soldiers to crowds of civilians who have spent weeks perfecting their ability to wave plastic flowers in unison.
For outside military analysts, though, the highlight is the weaponry that the North puts on display.
A series of what appeared to be KN-08 missiles were among the weapons rolled out on trucks. Analysts say the missiles could one day be capable of hitting targets as far as the continental United States, although North Korea has yet to flight test them.
The parade also included large rockets covered by canisters in two different types of transporter erector launcher trucks, or TELs. An official from South Korea’s Defense Ministry couldn’t immediately confirm whether any of the rockets represented a new type of ICBM.
Kim Dong-yub, a North Korea expert at Seoul’s Institute for Far Eastern Studies, said the canisters and trucks suggested that the North was developing technology to “cold launch” ICBMs, ejecting them from the canisters before they ignite. This would allow North Korea to prevent its limited number of ICBM-capable launcher trucks from being damaged during launches and also make the missiles harder to detect after they’re fired, he said. Cold launches would also allow the missiles to be fired from silos.
Kim, the analyst, said it’s likely that North Korea is also developing solid-fuel ICBMs, and that some of the rockets inside the canisters on Saturday might have been prototypes.
Other military hardware at the parade included tanks, multiple rocket launchers and artillery, as well as a solid-fuel missile designed to be fired from submarines. Also on display was a powerful midrange missile that outside analysts call a “Musudan,” and which can potentially reach U.S. air bases in Guam, as well as a new solid-fuel midrange missile that can be fired from land mobile launchers, making them harder to detect before launch.
Kim Jong Un, a 30-something leader who took power in late 2011 after the death of his father, Kim Jong Il, emphasizes nuclear weapons as the foundation of his national defense strategy. Under his watch, North Korea has aggressively pursued a goal of putting a nuclear warhead on an ICBM capable of reaching the continental United States.
In his annual New Year’s address, Kim said North Korea’s preparations for an ICBM launch had “reached the final stage.” Recent satellite imagery suggests the country could conduct another underground nuclear test at any time.
North Korea conducted two nuclear tests last year alone, advancing its goal to make nuclear weapons small enough to fit on long-range missiles. The North also last year launched a long-range rocket that put a satellite into orbit, which Washington, Seoul and others saw as a banned test of missile technology.
Other senior officials joining Kim at the parade podium included Kim Won Hong, who the South Korean government had said earlier this year was fired from his job as state security minister, presumably over corruption. South Korea has a spotty record of tracking developments in North Korea, as information about the secretive, authoritarian state is often impossible to confirm.
___
Associated Press writer Kim Tong-hyung in Seoul, South Korea, contributed to this report.
Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Preparing For The Nuclear Holocaust (Revelation 15)

Image: Declassified list reveals U.S. targets Russia’s high density population centers with nuclear weapons… Russia likely does the same for the USA

There is an ongoing debate over whether the existence of nuclear weapons makes America a safer place or whether it puts our country in harm’s way. For the most part, the debate falls along party lines – that is to say, Republicans generally believe that maintaining a nuclear stockpile is necessary, while Democrats, including the former President, do not. But regardless of all the arguments for or against a nuclear arsenal, the fact of the matter is that the United States possesses roughly 6,800 nuclear warheads, second only to Russia, which is armed with about 7,000. Other countries don’t even come close to these figures – the United Kingdom has roughly 215 nuclear warheads, France has around 300, China has 260 and Israel has 80.
With nuclear arsenals of this scope and size, it is clear that a war between the United States and Russia would be nothing short of catastrophic. Given the fact that tensions between the two countries have been on the rise in recent days following President Trump’s air strikes on a Syrian airfield, many people are becoming worried that one day soon, those nuclear weapons could be used. Of course, such a conflict between the United States and Russia would force other countries like Iran, Syria and the United Kingdom to take action as well, potentially leading to a third world war.
As most people are already aware, the United States and Russia have never exactly been close allies. In December of 2015, the National Security Archive declassified a list from 1956 that detailed hundreds of Russian cities and airfields that would become targets in the event of a nuclear war. The nearly 800-page document, titled “Atomic Weapons Requirements Study for 1959,” outlines over 1,200 cities in Russia and elsewhere, including Moscow, East Berlin, and Beijing, and also includes 1,100 airfields. William Burr from the National Security Archive describes the target list as the most detailed list ever released by the Air Force. “It’s disturbing, for sure, to see the population centers targeted,” Burr said, referencing the fact that most targets on the list had dense civilian populations.
Time Magazine also commented on the list, writing, “It’s clear that the plan so dryly laid out by US intelligence would have resulted in death and destruction unlike anything the world had or has ever seen.” It is worth noting that Time Magazine has developed something of a reputation for commentating from a left wing perspective. One could just as easily make the argument that the plan “so dryly laid out by U.S. intelligence” was actually necessary considering the circumstances at the time.
According to RT, the declassified document also calls for “systemic destruction” in the event of a nuclear war with Russia, and aimed to create a 60-megaton bomb, which would be 4000 times larger than the bomb dropped on Hiroshima in August of 1945.
Given the history of tension between the United States and Russia, it is not much of a stretch to assume that the Russians have a similar list of American targets they would strike in the event of a massive nuclear war. More than likely, such a list would include areas of the country with high populations like New York City, Los Angeles, Chicago, Houston and Philadelphia. (RELATED: Which U.S cities wold be targeted in the event of a nuclear war?)
Five separate strikes in these cities alone would affect the lives of roughly 18 million Americans, or 5.6 percent of the United States population. It is also likely that Russia has made plans for new types of nuclear weapons that could inflict far more damage than the bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Indeed, just last year Russia unveiled images of “Satan 2,” a nuclear missile that is capable of wiping out areas as big as the state of Texas.
For now, the entire world watches and waits to see what these two global superpowers will do next. Only time will tell. Stay informed about radiation fallout at Radiation.news.